Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [MicroMaxRockets] MMX Boost Gliders

Expand Messages
  • Bill Spadafora
    ... If you re talking about this Wombat http://www.dars.org/jimz/amrk-5.htm it s 18mm. ... -- Bill Spadafora http://home.att.net/~billspad or
    Message 1 of 13 , Sep 12, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      At 02:06 PM 9/12/2005 Jeffrey Walsh said:
      >I'll certainly accept this challenge. The original Wombat is 13mm so it may
      >not be too difficult to achieve the Wombat flavor in a MMX Boost Glider.
      >The problem will most likely be the classic "which material gives the most
      >bang".

      If you're talking about this Wombat

      http://www.dars.org/jimz/amrk-5.htm

      it's 18mm.


      >

      --
      Bill Spadafora http://home.att.net/~billspad or
      http://www.billsplumbing.com or
      NARTS http://www.nar.org/NARTS/
      billspad@... bill@... narts@...
    • Jeffrey Walsh
      I stand corrected. That is the Wombat I am thinking of. Cheers, Jeff ... may ... If you re talking about this Wombat http://www.dars.org/jimz/amrk-5.htm it s
      Message 2 of 13 , Sep 12, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        I stand corrected. That is the Wombat I am thinking of.

        Cheers,

        Jeff

        -----Original Message-----

        At 02:06 PM 9/12/2005 Jeffrey Walsh said:
        >I'll certainly accept this challenge. The original Wombat is 13mm so it
        may
        >not be too difficult to achieve the Wombat flavor in a MMX Boost Glider.
        >The problem will most likely be the classic "which material gives the most
        >bang".

        If you're talking about this Wombat

        http://www.dars.org/jimz/amrk-5.htm

        it's 18mm.


        >

        --
        Bill Spadafora http://home.att.net/~billspad or
        http://www.billsplumbing.com or
        NARTS http://www.nar.org/NARTS/
        billspad@... bill@... narts@...
      • J. Steven York
        Some particulates can exhibit strange properties under certain circumstances. For instance, I ve seen a kid s pool filled with a cornstarch and water mixture.
        Message 3 of 13 , Sep 12, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Some particulates can exhibit strange properties under certain
          circumstances. For instance, I've seen a kid's pool filled with a
          cornstarch and water mixture. In the demonstration, it was possible to run
          across the soupy stuff and stay dry, but if you simply slowly put a foot in,
          or just stood there, you'd sink right to the bottom. Under rapid and sudden
          force, the stuff acted like a solid. The rest of the time, it was a liquid.
          It's what's called a non-Newtonian fluid.

          Powders and granules can also have unusual fluid-like properties (I think
          there's a whole science of how grain behaves in silos). Maybe the force of
          the ejection charge is causing the grains in the talc to "lock" into a solid
          plug. This might well only work in particular sizes of container. There's
          an R&D project for someone to take on. <G>

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "vincent_jeff" <jvincent@...>
          To: <MicroMaxRockets@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, September 12, 2005 5:59 AM
          Subject: [MicroMaxRockets] Re: Great Weekend of Micro Flights!


          > --- In MicroMaxRockets@yahoogroups.com, "John McCoy Sr."
          > <mrcluster@y...> wrote:
          >>
          >> As anyone else had a problem getting .281" dia model to eject
          >> tracking powder? I had 3 failed altitude attempts. all I believe
          >> due to no ejection of the tracking powder. all three used minimium
          >> diameter .281" bodies. with babypowder/tempra tracking powder.
          > Non
          >> held more then 1g of powder loosely loaded on top of the 3/4"
          > teflon
          >> streamers. All three used styrofoam plugs. Altutude model
          >> Popped the nose but didn't eject the powder, Superroc Alt model the
          >> same, 2x1/8A cluster Altitude didn't even eject the nose cone.
          > both
          >> motors lite and both ejection charges could clearly be heard. but
          >> Nothing came out. motor casings remained in all three models. I
          >> can't imagine that small amount of tracking powder could prevent
          > all
          >> these MM-1 motors from ejection?
          >
          > John, I don't post much, but first off, kudos for creating and
          > sustaining this group (and the MM cause).
          >
          > When we started flying 10mm models in the Internats in the mid-'80s,
          > we found this to be a problem (actually, it starts showing up with
          > 13mm tubes). The smaller the diameter of the tube is, the greater
          > the amount of skin friction you've got holding the loose tracking
          > powder back. I think it was Art Rose who started using something
          > akin to the old Stine "parachute protector" to hold the TP.
          >
          > I make mine from old MRC or new Quest wadding (you want something a
          > little "crisper" than Estes wadding to hold its shape). I take a
          > piece that's sized to make a little more than one wrap around the
          > tube and a little longer than the amount of TP you plan to use. I
          > wrap the wadding around a brass tube that just fits inside the body
          > tube and crimp in or twist together enough of one end of the wading
          > to hold the TP. I slide my device most of the way into the tube and
          > load in the TP (others may choose to load it outside the model's body
          > tube and crimp the top shut as well). Load you recovery device atop
          > this and fly. It should slide cleanly out of the tube and deploy
          > your powder nicely.
          >
          > -- Jeff
          >
          > PS - I had MM B/Gs and an R/G at our Open meet Saturday, but I got
          > too busy and the weather deteriorated before I could fly them. Too
          > bad, as Mark Hutchinson had a 9 1/2 min 1/4A FW flight and Alex
          > DeMarco had a 5 min A SRDur flight (but no returns) before the wind
          > came up and the thermals went away.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • John McCoy Sr.
          Excellent point Steve, You re certainly right about the R&D, Would make for some very interesting experiments. Thanks for the info. John ... possible to run
          Message 4 of 13 , Sep 13, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Excellent point Steve,
            You're certainly right about the R&D, Would make for some very
            interesting experiments.
            Thanks for the info.
            John


            --- In MicroMaxRockets@yahoogroups.com, "J. Steven York" <j-steven-
            york@s...> wrote:
            > Some particulates can exhibit strange properties under certain
            > circumstances. For instance, I've seen a kid's pool filled with a
            > cornstarch and water mixture. In the demonstration, it was
            possible to run
            > across the soupy stuff and stay dry, but if you simply slowly put a
            foot in,
            > or just stood there, you'd sink right to the bottom. Under rapid
            and sudden
            > force, the stuff acted like a solid. The rest of the time, it was
            a liquid.
            > It's what's called a non-Newtonian fluid.
            >
            > Powders and granules can also have unusual fluid-like properties (I
            think
            > there's a whole science of how grain behaves in silos). Maybe the
            force of
            > the ejection charge is causing the grains in the talc to "lock"
            into a solid
            > plug. This might well only work in particular sizes of container.
            There's
            > an R&D project for someone to take on. <G>
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: "vincent_jeff" <jvincent@a...>
            > To: <MicroMaxRockets@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Monday, September 12, 2005 5:59 AM
            > Subject: [MicroMaxRockets] Re: Great Weekend of Micro Flights!
            >
            >
            > > --- In MicroMaxRockets@yahoogroups.com, "John McCoy Sr."
            > > <mrcluster@y...> wrote:
            > >>
            > >> As anyone else had a problem getting .281" dia model to
            eject
            > >> tracking powder? I had 3 failed altitude attempts. all I
            believe
            > >> due to no ejection of the tracking powder. all three used
            minimium
            > >> diameter .281" bodies. with babypowder/tempra tracking powder.
            > > Non
            > >> held more then 1g of powder loosely loaded on top of the 3/4"
            > > teflon
            > >> streamers. All three used styrofoam plugs. Altutude model
            > >> Popped the nose but didn't eject the powder, Superroc Alt model
            the
            > >> same, 2x1/8A cluster Altitude didn't even eject the nose cone.
            > > both
            > >> motors lite and both ejection charges could clearly be heard. but
            > >> Nothing came out. motor casings remained in all three models. I
            > >> can't imagine that small amount of tracking powder could prevent
            > > all
            > >> these MM-1 motors from ejection?
            > >
            > > John, I don't post much, but first off, kudos for creating and
            > > sustaining this group (and the MM cause).
            > >
            > > When we started flying 10mm models in the Internats in the mid-
            '80s,
            > > we found this to be a problem (actually, it starts showing up with
            > > 13mm tubes). The smaller the diameter of the tube is, the greater
            > > the amount of skin friction you've got holding the loose tracking
            > > powder back. I think it was Art Rose who started using something
            > > akin to the old Stine "parachute protector" to hold the TP.
            > >
            > > I make mine from old MRC or new Quest wadding (you want something
            a
            > > little "crisper" than Estes wadding to hold its shape). I take a
            > > piece that's sized to make a little more than one wrap around the
            > > tube and a little longer than the amount of TP you plan to use. I
            > > wrap the wadding around a brass tube that just fits inside the
            body
            > > tube and crimp in or twist together enough of one end of the
            wading
            > > to hold the TP. I slide my device most of the way into the tube
            and
            > > load in the TP (others may choose to load it outside the model's
            body
            > > tube and crimp the top shut as well). Load you recovery device
            atop
            > > this and fly. It should slide cleanly out of the tube and deploy
            > > your powder nicely.
            > >
            > > -- Jeff
            > >
            > > PS - I had MM B/Gs and an R/G at our Open meet Saturday, but I got
            > > too busy and the weather deteriorated before I could fly them.
            Too
            > > bad, as Mark Hutchinson had a 9 1/2 min 1/4A FW flight and Alex
            > > DeMarco had a 5 min A SRDur flight (but no returns) before the
            wind
            > > came up and the thermals went away.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
          • w1vt
            I ve discovered that I can actually do a lot of pre-flight testing with MMX Boost gliders. In my basement, I trim the gliders for a nice flat glide. In the
            Message 5 of 13 , Sep 14, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              I've discovered that I can actually do a lot of pre-flight testing
              with MMX Boost gliders.

              In my basement, I trim the gliders for a nice flat glide.

              In the back yard, I can use the crosswinds to determine dynamic
              stability--does it still glide well when hit by a gust of wind?
              Wood glue is great for figuring out the optimum amount of dihedral--I
              can soak of the wing and try again.

              I can also toss them straight up to see how they transition into a
              glide. Some designs will just go straight down into the ground--
              these need some modification before I'll fly them.

              There is plenty of time to figure out flight characteristics without
              having a big hill.

              I've learned a lot about glider design just by pre-flight testing.

              Zack Lau
            • John McCoy Sr.
              Micro BG s haven t been as big a problem as RG s, I just love the old Nomad spring activated elevator design I ve been flying 1/4A -B for years. It was one
              Message 6 of 13 , Sep 14, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                Micro BG's haven't been as big a problem as RG's, I just love the
                old "Nomad" spring activated elevator design I've been flying 1/4A -B
                for years. It was one of the very frist micro
                Downscale "competition" type model I build. Micro Nomad-1 worked
                great until I tried to launch it in a little to stiff a wind, it did
                a 90 of the rod tip right into the back of my van...completely
                destroyed! Glider nunber -2 just will not boost. I know the wing
                lift is causing the loop, i've tried to give it down elevator to
                counter the lift, and a little roll but it's so dang quick I have yet
                to get it to glide above 6" off the ground after power:(

                I totally agree with your pre-flight testing, even in my tiny
                townhouse basement I have a long enough shot to test flexies and most
                BG's.

                Has anyone else out there built a downscale Ivee from my plan? if
                so has it been successful in transition. My Ivee has flown about 5
                times, 9 if you count the 4 red baron flight last weekend. Before I
                broke the boom in my range box, she seperated and did a tight but
                gentle circular glide. After white glue and tissue repair, sanded
                smooth and totally un-noticable that behind the wing repair MUST be
                effecting something???? 4 flight 3 major red barons and I about 8
                sec glide with the pod dangling. Anybody have this experence?
                Keep em flyin Micronozed
                John

                --- In MicroMaxRockets@yahoogroups.com, "w1vt" <kh6cp@a...> wrote:
                > I've discovered that I can actually do a lot of pre-flight testing
                > with MMX Boost gliders.
                >
                > In my basement, I trim the gliders for a nice flat glide.
                >
                > In the back yard, I can use the crosswinds to determine dynamic
                > stability--does it still glide well when hit by a gust of wind?
                > Wood glue is great for figuring out the optimum amount of dihedral--
                I
                > can soak of the wing and try again.
                >
                > I can also toss them straight up to see how they transition into a
                > glide. Some designs will just go straight down into the ground--
                > these need some modification before I'll fly them.
                >
                > There is plenty of time to figure out flight characteristics
                without
                > having a big hill.
                >
                > I've learned a lot about glider design just by pre-flight testing.
                >
                > Zack Lau
              • jeffvegh@rocketmail.com
                John, I don t have any detailed drawings ( I use the free version of GCADD and can t save ) but I have uploaded a photo (jeffs stuff in the photos section) of
                Message 7 of 13 , Feb 9, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  John, I don't have any detailed drawings ( I use the free version of GCADD and can't save ) but I have uploaded a photo (jeffs stuff in the photos section) of my three latest. They are laid out lightest to heaviest ( note 13mm motor for scale). The one in the middle is the newest and best trimmed to date, not requiring any additional weights to fly well. I'm not sure if any of them are competition worthly yet but that is the ultimate goal.

                  I understand what you mean about keeping the weight down on the Mach 10. When I built my Orbital Transport I knew it would be on the heavy side for MMX. I used T3 for the booster and T2 for the glider and by time I got the paint and decals on it I was over 11 grams! Sure enough its lucky to hit 25 feet at ejection but it looks good doing it LOL!

                  Thanks for the reply and I look foward to your next project(s).

                  Jeff
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.