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RE: [MichiganFoxHunter] For all the tower climbers out there, safety first

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  • Mark
    Thanks for thinking of our safety, but the harnesses that are covered in the brochure are not meant for tower climbing. They are designed for fall protection
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 14 6:57 AM
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    • Mark
      Thanks for thinking of our safety, but the harnesses that are covered in the brochure are not meant for tower climbing. They are designed for fall protection
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 14 7:06 AM
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        Thanks for thinking of our safety, but the harnesses that are covered in the brochure are not meant for tower climbing.  They are designed for fall protection at construction sites.  I have spent many hours wearing them (and cursing at them because they are a royal PITA to try to work in….but are proven life savers)

         

        Below is a pic of a true tower harness.  Note the D ring is in the front, not the back.  Also note the extra side rings.

         

         

        Tower Climbing Harness Removable Seat 1113193

        http://www.towerclimbing.com/

         

        It’s pretty much the same for any harness though, if it looks bad, it is bad. 

         

        A HUGE safety concern is the straight out determination of the integrity of the tower.  Who here is really qualified (as in training and experience) to determine if a tower is safe to climb or not?   Tube type towers tend to rust from the inside.  They may look fine on the outside, but can crumble under the added weight of a climber, and when that happens, harnesses aren’t much good.

         

        My advice, coming from many years of both construction work and ham radio operations, is simply don’t climb towers.  I don’t know of a single privately owned ham tower too tall to use a man lift on.  I have been on them that were rated for 135 feet.  Sure, they are expensive buggers, but what is a life worth?  Remember, the right equipment to climb the tower isn’t cheap, either.  The harness above is about $500.  Then you need the other stuff that goes with it, and if you use it a few times, it will likely not pass the stringent inspections for safety applied to climbing harnesses and you will have to get a new one.  You still have to wear a harness in the man lift, but they are the type in the brochure.  They may also be available for rent at the place the man lift is rented from.  Lucky me, I have access to a couple bucket trucks and am in good favor with their owners.  There will be no climbing of towers at this QTH.

         

        Thanks Tom, for your concern, but the flyer you sent really is not applicable to climbing harnesses.  Tom is right on the money with the root of his concern, though, as tower accidents are probably the #1 cause of fatality amongst our likes.  Besides falls, contact with electrical lines are a potentially fatal hazard.  I hear about those from two fronts.  Besides being a ham, I am a licensed electrician.  I also have OHSA 10 and OSHA 30 training.  Those graphically show the results of falls and electrocutions.  So I am a bit more exposed to the risks and results associated with the reward of saving a few bucks.

         

        Stay safe, all

         

        73

         

        Mark K8MHZ

         

         

      • Alan Beagley
        I assume that HARC still has the DBI Sala harness I donated. I had bought it on eBay when I was planning to buy a tower I would need to climb, but I
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 14 11:15 AM
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          I assume that HARC still has the DBI Sala harness I donated. I had
          bought it on eBay when I was planning to buy a tower I would need to
          climb, but I subsequently decided on a tilt-over crank-up.

          73

          Alan NV8A


          On 04/14/13 09:57 am, Mark wrote:
          > Thanks for thinking of our safety, but the harnesses that are covered in the
          > brochure are not meant for tower climbing. They are designed for fall
          > protection at construction sites. I have spent many hours wearing them (and
          > cursing at them because they are a royal PITA to try to work in….but are
          > proven life savers)
          >
          > Below is a pic of a true tower harness. Note the D ring is in the front,
          > not the back. Also note the extra side rings.
          >
          >
          > Tower Climbing Harness Removable Seat 1113193
          > http://www.towerclimbing.com/
          >
          > It’s pretty much the same for any harness though, if it looks bad, it is
          > bad.
          >
          > A HUGE safety concern is the straight out determination of the integrity of
          > the tower. Who here is really qualified (as in training and experience) to
          > determine if a tower is safe to climb or not? Tube type towers tend to
          > rust from the inside. They may look fine on the outside, but can crumble
          > under the added weight of a climber, and when that happens, harnesses aren’t
          > much good.
          >
          > My advice, coming from many years of both construction work and ham radio
          > operations, is simply don’t climb towers. I don’t know of a single
          > privately owned ham tower too tall to use a man lift on. I have been on
          > them that were rated for 135 feet. Sure, they are expensive buggers, but
          > what is a life worth? Remember, the right equipment to climb the tower isn’
          > t cheap, either. The harness above is about $500. Then you need the other
          > stuff that goes with it, and if you use it a few times, it will likely not
          > pass the stringent inspections for safety applied to climbing harnesses and
          > you will have to get a new one. You still have to wear a harness in the man
          > lift, but they are the type in the brochure. They may also be available for
          > rent at the place the man lift is rented from. Lucky me, I have access to a
          > couple bucket trucks and am in good favor with their owners. There will be
          > no climbing of towers at this QTH.
          >
          > Thanks Tom, for your concern, but the flyer you sent really is not
          > applicable to climbing harnesses. Tom is right on the money with the root
          > of his concern, though, as tower accidents are probably the #1 cause of
          > fatality amongst our likes. Besides falls, contact with electrical lines
          > are a potentially fatal hazard. I hear about those from two fronts.
          > Besides being a ham, I am a licensed electrician. I also have OHSA 10 and
          > OSHA 30 training. Those graphically show the results of falls and
          > electrocutions. So I am a bit more exposed to the risks and results
          > associated with the reward of saving a few bucks.
          >
          > Stay safe, all
          >
          > 73
          >
          > Mark K8MHZ
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: MichiganFoxHunter@yahoogroups.com
          > [mailto:MichiganFoxHunter@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Tom KD8DEG
          > Sent: Saturday, April 13, 2013 5:06 PM
          > To: WMSAT@yahoogroups.com; WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com;
          > W8USA@yahoogroups.com; MichiganFoxHunter yahoogroup;
          > kalamazoohamradio@yahoogroups.com; k8daa@yahoogroups.com;
          > HollandARCyahoogroups; GRARA@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [MichiganFoxHunter] For all the tower climbers out there, safety
          > first
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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