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RE: [Michalak] Re: JB Jr. Material List/ polycarbonate vs acrylic / tinted vs. clear

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  • Jeff Blunck
    Most boat windows need some curvature to fit on the cabin sides, especially anything bigger than a port hole. Poly or Plexi will also not fracture as easy as
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 3, 2005
      Most boat windows need some curvature to fit on the cabin sides, especially
      anything bigger than a port hole. Poly or Plexi will also not fracture as
      easy as the hull flexes under heavy stresses such as a knockdown.

      Even a cruise ship can get windows knocked out as is the case of the boat
      with the students out on the North Pacific. I wonder if they had safety
      glass or Lexan?


      Jeff


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Bruce Hallman [mailto:bruce@...]
      Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2005 8:48 AM
      To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [Michalak] Re: JB Jr. Material List/ polycarbonate vs acrylic /
      tinted vs. clear


      > This is probably a terribly naive question, but here goes - what is
      > wrong with glass? You know, no plexi, no lexan, just glass - or maybe
      > safety glass if you are worried about it breaking.

      FWIW, I just built a Bolger Micro Navigator which has an all around 'glass
      house'. I used 1/8" generic Lexan, called Palsun, I recall. I bought it on
      eBay, for pretty cheap [< $100 I recall].
      The strength of polycarbonate is astonishing. The 1/8" thickness does some
      serious 'oil can' but that is only an aesthetic, and doesn't cause any
      problem. My feeling is that the 1/8" windows are a
      *stronger* part of the boat than the adjacent 1/4" plywood in the hull.
      In short, I strongly recommend polycarbonate for boat windows.

      Real glass could be used, and only you could decide how much safety you
      need. Do your research about glass. Tempered glass has the advantage of
      being 'prestressed' so that when it cracks it breaks into relatively safe
      'pieces' versus 'wicked daggers'. Automobiles use tempered glass, also most
      building codes require it in places that can be kicked such as doors, etc..
      For me at least, glass wouldn't be safe enough.

      Keep in mind that with Jewelbox Jr. that during a knockdown, for a brief
      period of time, the side of the boat will be 'down', and the windows would
      be the 'bottom' of the boat, with heavy things being tossed around inside
      the boat.


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    • robrohdeszudy
      What Chuck said. But adding the point that real glass is a pain in the butt to cut. Polycarbonate is a breeze. --Rob
      Message 2 of 15 , Feb 10, 2005
        What Chuck said. But adding the point that real glass is a pain in
        the butt to cut. Polycarbonate is a breeze.
        --Rob
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