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foam core

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  • Pierre
    I ve been reading some pieces of info here and there about laminating ply to foam, pink stuff, blue stuff and others would this be suitable for a sliding hatch
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 5, 2005
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      I've been reading some pieces of info here and there about laminating
      ply to foam, pink stuff, blue stuff and others would this be suitable
      for a sliding hatch ?

      Where could I find a good read-up on the process and materials
      involved

      thanks to all

      Pierre
    • David Davis
      Pierre, I just made a couple foam sliding hatches, but I used a wooden frame with one inch thick foam and ribs spaced about 6 inches apart. Saves a lot of
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 6, 2005
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        Pierre,

        I just made a couple "foam" sliding hatches, but I used a wooden
        frame with one inch thick foam and ribs spaced about 6 inches apart.

        Saves a lot of weight and is plenty strong. I think 1/2 inch thick
        wooden cut ribs, rails and ends would be strong enough if glassed
        both sides to prevent spliting. With the thin wood I had to drill
        large pilot holes for each deck screw to prevent spliting.

        The ribs need to be 1/2 X 1 or 3/4 X 1 1/2 inches and cut with a 1
        to 2 inch crown depending on size of hatch and boat. You might need
        to see over them to see ahead so take that into consideration.
        Could build a flat hatch if need be, but that will reduce strength.

        The foam and ribs need a good crown to them to add strength and also
        need to be glassed with 4 -6 oz cloth both sides with special
        attention to the glass / ribs glue joint.

        I just used bead board foam as I don't expect a lot of flexing of
        the hatch but you may want a heavy closed cell foam if you intend to
        step on the hatch. The thicker the foam the better the insulation
        and strength.

        I cut the foam a little over sized so it would be in compression and
        glued it in place with a thin epoxy putty. Expect to use a pint of
        epoxy or so depending on the hatch size. The bead board foam sanded
        OK with a rotory sander if great care is used.

        Don't use the plywood except maybe as a removeable form unless you
        are willing to accept a heavy hatch.

        You can make a hatch entirely out of foam and glass but you would
        need to build a male or female form, wax it or maybe cover it with
        plastic as a release agent, would likely be heavy and not be worth
        the effort for a one off hatch.

        David Davis
      • Pierre
        David, your post was indeed a good read. But I m kinda new at all this and rather visual. Not really sure what you mean by rails and ends I have not a clue
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 6, 2005
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          David, your post was indeed a good read.

          But I'm kinda new at all this and rather visual.

          Not really sure what you mean by "rails" and "ends"
          I have not a clue what a "crown" is
          and what kinda foam is "bead board foam"

          Please excuse my ignorance and pesky questions

          Sliding hatch is for an AF4G.

          Ply is way!!! to heavy, I know I built it. Guess I'll use it for
          something else if I can manage the foam ones

          Thanks

          Pierre



          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "David Davis" <sharpie3444@y...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Pierre,
          >
          > I just made a couple "foam" sliding hatches, but I used a wooden
          > frame with one inch thick foam and ribs spaced about 6 inches apart.
          >
          > Saves a lot of weight and is plenty strong. I think 1/2 inch
          thick
          > wooden cut ribs, rails and ends would be strong enough if glassed
          > both sides to prevent spliting. With the thin wood I had to drill
          > large pilot holes for each deck screw to prevent spliting.
          >
          > The ribs need to be 1/2 X 1 or 3/4 X 1 1/2 inches and cut with a 1
          > to 2 inch crown depending on size of hatch and boat. You might need
          > to see over them to see ahead so take that into consideration.
          > Could build a flat hatch if need be, but that will reduce strength.
          >
          > The foam and ribs need a good crown to them to add strength and
          also
          > need to be glassed with 4 -6 oz cloth both sides with special
          > attention to the glass / ribs glue joint.
          >
          > I just used bead board foam as I don't expect a lot of flexing of
          > the hatch but you may want a heavy closed cell foam if you intend
          to
          > step on the hatch. The thicker the foam the better the insulation
          > and strength.
          >
          > I cut the foam a little over sized so it would be in compression
          and
          > glued it in place with a thin epoxy putty. Expect to use a pint of
          > epoxy or so depending on the hatch size. The bead board foam
          sanded
          > OK with a rotory sander if great care is used.
          >
          > Don't use the plywood except maybe as a removeable form unless you
          > are willing to accept a heavy hatch.
          >
          > You can make a hatch entirely out of foam and glass but you would
          > need to build a male or female form, wax it or maybe cover it with
          > plastic as a release agent, would likely be heavy and not be worth
          > the effort for a one off hatch.
          >
          > David Davis
        • David Davis
          Bead board is just white construction foam, very light weight
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 7, 2005
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            Bead board is just white construction foam, very light weight < 2
            pounds per cubic foot. Small white beads of foam bonded together
            with heat and pressure. It is weak in tension but a little stronger
            in compression if you can keep it from buckling with glass and wood
            frames. The beads shed off the sheet over time and made a mess so if
            used in boats it needs to be contained with glass or if used for
            floatation light wooden chambers with removible covers to allow dry
            out. I have used holes covered with nylon screen to contain the
            foam and still allow drainage and allow air circulation.

            Check your e-mail Pierre.
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