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Re: Rub rails

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  • chrisbfeller
    Barry, Of the ones listed I would choose Douglas fir. However I would recommend looking into local sawmills if you have any. I know that in the midwest
    Message 1 of 16 , Dec 5, 2004
      Barry,
      Of the ones listed I would choose Douglas fir. However I would
      recommend looking into local sawmills if you have any. I know that in
      the midwest (Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and so on) there is alot of white
      oak available even air dried for very low prices. I have paid as
      little as 30 cents a board foot for good 5/4 air dried oak.

      Chris
      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "chumlyii" <bgt0990@o...> wrote:
      >
      > Well I'm stumped, If red oak and maple and I assume poplar all rot
      > that only leaves me white pine, Douglas fir and cedar all of which I
      > would have thought to soft for decent 'wails'.
      >
      > That's all Home Depot carries, we don't have Lowes around here and
      > the few independent Lumber yards have less of a selection than HD.
      >
      > Barry
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "awellbalancedgun"
      > <awellbalancedgun@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > > I had just inquired about red (soft) and sugar (hard) maple on the
      > > Welsford website - I never see any references to its use for boat
      > > making. The response: Maple rots.
      > >
      > > Too bad - I have access to bunches of it (I had hoped it would be
      > > suitable for wooden block cheeks or cleats).
      > >
      > > TJH
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "chumlyii" <bgt0990@o...> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > What would the thought be on maple? Hard, fine grained not very
      > > > pretty unless stained. The only other hardwood i've seen in
      > > quantity
      > > > around here is poplar.
      > > >
      > > > Thanks for all the responses, it all helps.
      > > > Barry
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "David" <arbordg@y...> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "chumlyii" <bgt0990@o...>
      > wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I'm in a quandry as to how to attach/glue/secure the rub
      > rails
      > > to
      > > > my
      > > > > > Priogue. >
      > > > > > First I'ld like to say what I would like to do: >
      > > > > > I'm using 1.5" x 3/4" red oak, I like the look of the wood
      > and
      > > > would
      > > > > > prefer something natural in the way of finish.>
      > > > > > Can I give the rails a good rub down with Linseed oil and
      > then
      > > > will
      > > > > I be able to glue them or varnish them? I'm afraid the
      > linseed
      > > > oil
      > > > > > will stop adhesion of these materials.>
      > > > > > I was planning to use titebond III clamped every few inches
      > > out
      > > > > from the center and with a suitable screw in the stem and
      > stern
      > > > posts.>
      > > > > > I dont realy want to screw them the entire length, as the
      > > screws
      > > > > will certainly look bad.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > This is my first wood boat, any help would be appreciated.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Barry
      > > > > *******************
      > > > >
      > > > > Hi Barry,
      > > > >
      > > > > I'm a professional woodworker, but a neophyte boatbuilder. We
      > > are
      > > > just
      > > > > finishing the first boat I've ever built.
      > > > >
      > > > > First, let me be contrary and say, Red Oak is not the best
      > > choice of
      > > > > wood for wet locations. If you looked at it under a microscope,
      > > > you'd
      > > > > see that the pores are open tunnels, unlike White Oak, Ash, or
      > > many
      > > > > others. This results in sponge-like behavior - sucking up and
      > > > > retaining water. This water then interacts with the ambient
      > > > bacteria,
      > > > > and the sugars in the wood, to grow mold & fungus. The result
      > is
      > > an
      > > > > ongoing infestation of black-spotted ugliness and rot. So, if
      > > you
      > > > can,
      > > > > I'd recommend finding another material. Linsee oil, by the way,
      > > will
      > > > > not slow down this process, but I suspect would instead
      > > accelerate
      > > > it.
      > > > >
      > > > > As to finishing before attachment - that's not generally a good
      > > idea
      > > > > if you're going to glue. The oil contaminates the joint,
      > > > compromising
      > > > > the joint quality. Even if you mask off, or try to stay away
      > > from
      > > > the
      > > > > joint. Oil migrates. Aggressively. However, one way of
      > attaching
      > > rub
      > > > > rails involves fasteners only - no glue. The thinking there is
      > > that
      > > > > they are sacrificial, and replacement will be much easier
      > > without
      > > > the
      > > > > glue. If the screws are evenly spaced, they are not necessarily
      > > > > unsightly - though beauty, of course, is in the eye of the
      > > beholder.
      > > > > If you don't want to see metal you can also counterbore the
      > > screws,
      > > > > and plug the holes with bungs. You then have to ream out the
      > > bungs
      > > > > when time comes to replace the rubrail.
      > > > >
      > > > > Regarding Titebond III, it is billed as waterproof. It is a
      > > > reputable
      > > > > manufacturer, and Titebond II has certainly lived up to their
      > > > claims.
      > > > > Nonetheless, I'm not sure I'd trust the T-III too much until it
      > > has
      > > > a
      > > > > little bit of a real-world track record. Given that it's a
      > > rubrail,
      > > > > not something critical to the integrity of the hull, it might
      > be
      > > a
      > > > > good place to give T-III a tryout. If you do, and have
      > problems,
      > > > we'd
      > > > > all like to hear about it.
      > > > >
      > > > > Whatever you decide, good luck and have fun.
      > > > >
      > > > > Cheers,
      > > > > David Graybeal
      > > > > Portland, OR.
      > > > >
      > > > > "Red meat is Not Bad For You. Now... the blue-green meat, THAT
      > > I'd
      > > > > stay away from" - Pat Paulson
    • kakwariver
      I have used white birch for canoe gunnels and kayak rub rails and birch is very rot prone - Two foggy mornings and one rainy day will rot the best birch fence
      Message 2 of 16 , Dec 5, 2004
        I have used white birch for canoe gunnels and kayak rub rails and
        birch is very rot prone - "Two foggy mornings and one rainy day will
        rot the best birch fence a man can build". But my boats are many years
        old and the rails and gunnels are in perfect condition. The secret -
        well varished wood and the boats are always stored under cover.
        Mike
      • vexatious2001
        ... much about the rot resistance of your chosen wood. I agree. If you are building a wooden work of art, or expecting the boat to last for generations, then
        Message 3 of 16 , Dec 5, 2004
          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "John B. Trussell"
          <John.Trussell@w...> wrote:


          >I'd suggest that you use whatever you want to, and not worry too
          much about the rot resistance of your chosen wood.




          I agree.

          If you are building a "wooden work of art,"
          or expecting the boat to last for generations,
          then it matters what wood you use.

          If "not" and "not," then it doesn't.


          Max
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