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Re: Blobster cockpit question.

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  • GarthAB
    Hi Chris -- I checked the Blobster layout on Duckworks and notice that you don t have as many bulkheads back there as Cormorant does (I should ve known) -- so
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 5, 2004
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      Hi Chris --

      I checked the Blobster layout on Duckworks and notice that you don't
      have as many bulkheads back there as Cormorant does (I should've
      known) -- so my remark about "the center square of nine" doesn't
      apply. But you'd still be able to do the sort of hatch I describe,
      jusr adding a single piece of 2x4 framing between your 2
      longitudinals, at the aft edge of the hatch. Everything else follows
      from there.

      Other thought is that the deckplate installation could be recessed
      1/8" with a router and you'd *really* have a flat layout.

      All best,
      Garth
    • chrisbfeller
      ... Garth, That sounds really good. I think I will do something like that instead. I think I will lengthen the hatch to four feet because I want a large foot
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 5, 2004
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        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "GarthAB" <garth@b...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > > Garth,
        > > I am interested in how you made the hatch low profile. I think
        > > this would really help make the cockpit more comfortable.
        > >
        > > Chris
        >
        >
        > Hi Chris --
        >
        > I haven't actually made this hatch yet, mind you. I just got my
        > decking on. But here's how it's designed in my fevered brain (I hope
        > can adequately describe this):
        > OK, so when you build the framing for the cockpit deck you have
        > these 2x4s running longitudinally and crosswise, notched into each
        > other, with 1/2" ply decking over all of it but the central square of
        > nine.
        > When you lay your plywood decking down on the 2x4s, you leave one
        > half of the width of the 2x4 around the hatch opening uncovered. I.e.
        > 3/4" of undecked 2x4 surrounds the hole, sitting 1/2" lower than the
        > decktop.
        > So you can lay a piece of ply into that hole as your hatch-top,
        > and have it rest on the lip of 2x4. Closed-cell-foam-weatherstrip the
        > 2x4 lip, and you have a pretty good seal. Now the problem is, how to
        > keep the hatch in place?
        > I'm planning to glue and screw 1x4s on edge to underside of the
        > hatch-top, 3/4" (+ a whisker) inside of the edge, so these 1x4s slide
        > down parallel to the 2x4s holding up your deck, just clearing them as
        > the hatch goes on.
        > Then I'll put a removable 5" deckplate (probably clear, to let in
        > some light into the hold) in the center of the hatchtop. This sticks
        > up maybe 1/8".
        > I'll devise some sort of spring-loaded latches to click in each
        > edge of the 1x4s and bolt/latch them to the 2x4 framing. Right now I'm
        > looking at nylon "elbow catches" -- though I thing even nails sprung
        > into matching holes by rubber bands might work. This is the weakest
        > part of the plan so far, but I'm sure I'll figure out something to do
        > the job.
        > To open hatch, unscrew deckplate, reach in and pull on two crossed
        > cords that lead to two pairs of spring-loaded latches on all 4 sides,
        > pull to unlatch, lift out hatch.
        > Finally, up on top of my hatch, I'll use a metal or wood strip
        > holding down a solid rubber weather-strip flap type thing (door sweep?
        > or even a piece of bicycle inner-tube laid flat) to seal water out of
        > the hatch-edge, basically pre-protection for the seal that already
        > exists at the lip.
        > Also a 1/8" thick x 1" piece glued flat around the outside of the
        > hatch hole up top, to keep rainwater from running into the hatch-edge
        > opening. Then the rubber flap could lie flat over that thin piece of
        > wood, maybe with a little overhang like a roof.
        >
        > Whew! Make any sense at all? It'll be easy to make -- it's just hard
        > to describe. The removable deckplate was the real revelation -- allows
        > you to have your latching mechanism underneath, so no need to raise
        > the hatch up and bungee it down.
        > Holler if any of this doesn't make sense, or if you see a fatal
        > flaw in the design . . .
        >
        > All best,
        > Garth

        Garth,
        That sounds really good. I think I will do something like that
        instead. I think I will lengthen the hatch to four feet because I
        want a large foot well and maybe put a floor below to bridge the
        center frame. I guess the only tricky part is getting a water tight
        seal around the hatch. Thanks for the detailed info.

        Chris
      • David Davis
        The removable deckplate was the real revelation -- allows ... Great Idea Garth!! A groove cut in the underside of the hatch cover fitted with an O ring (
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 5, 2004
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          The removable deckplate was the real revelation -- allows
          > you to have your latching mechanism underneath, so no need to raise
          > the hatch up and bungee it down.
          >
          > All best,
          > Garth

          Great Idea Garth!!

          A groove cut in the underside of the hatch cover fitted with an O
          ring ( screen door spline or windshield washer hose) might make a
          great seal. The area needs to be glassed well -- I think it's main
          function will end up being to keep the rain water out of the boat.

          Have you thought on how or if you want to lock up the hatch?? The
          under seat area might be about the best place to store and lock up
          an out board motor.

          Another option is to raise an grid like deck cover that makes the
          deck level with the raised hatch cover. This option might keep the
          boat cushions, etc out of rain water or any water that slops aboard.

          Another option is to just live with the raised hatch -- I think the
          deck chairs legs etc could be modified to set on or over the hatch.

          David Davis
        • GarthAB
          ... Hi David -- It would be pretty easy to rig a padlock under the hatch cover. It would be reachable from the deckplate, so you wouldn t have to crawl down
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 6, 2004
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            > Have you thought on how or if you want to lock up the hatch?? The
            > under seat area might be about the best place to store and lock up
            > an out board motor.


            Hi David --

            It would be pretty easy to rig a padlock under the hatch cover. It
            would be reachable from the deckplate, so you wouldn't have to crawl
            down under to unlock it. Catch two sides of the hatch with a metal bar
            that slides through two sets of brackets, etc. Again, I haven't fully
            envisioned this part, but I think it could be easily arranged with one
            trip to the hardware store . . .

            Of course, anyone who REALLY wanted to get into your hatch or into
            your boat could do it easily -- crowbar, sledgehammer, sawzall,
            chainsaw, etc. You just have to hope to you get (if any) only
            half-hearted, lazy, opportunistic thieves.

            All best,
            Garth


            All best,
            Garth
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