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Blobster cockpit question.

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  • chrisbfeller
    I am debating on making a full cockpit length self draining cockpit in my Blobster rather than the Micro style cockpit drawn. I am doing this because I want a
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 5, 2004
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      I am debating on making a full cockpit length self draining cockpit in
      my Blobster rather than the Micro style cockpit drawn. I am doing
      this because I want a longer foot well to accommodate more passengers
      in comfort. To be self draining it will have to be no deeper than 10
      maybe 12 inches. I have also thought about making this foot well not
      self draining and about 14 inches deep and just put a bilge pump in
      either end. I wondered what any of you might think of this.

      Thanks Chris
    • GarthAB
      Hi Chris -- Early on, I had a similar inclination to change Cormorant s well to be longer and self-draining, and asked Jim if altering/cutting through the tops
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 5, 2004
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        Hi Chris --

        Early on, I had a similar inclination to change Cormorant's well to be
        longer and self-draining, and asked Jim if altering/cutting through
        the tops of the aft frames to accommodate it would weaken the
        structure. He didn't seem to think that was much of an issue, and
        basically said, if you want to, go ahead.

        I did think that if I cut out a rectangular chunk from the tops of the
        frames, I'd have to make more of the lower frame solid (as opposed to
        the open oval there is now) -- so storage issues arose -- i.e. how to
        access the aft space below the deck?

        I know Chuck made a draining-footwell modification to his Caprice, so
        you can get good advice there.

        I ultimately decided against changing it, as I wanted the big open
        platform for sleeping out under the stars, should such an occasion
        ever arise (i.e. not too cold, windy, dewy, rainy, or buggy). I've
        come up with a way to make the hatch very low-profile, so it only
        sticks up above the deck by about 1/8" or 1/4", so we can throw a few
        Thermarests down and sprawl out in comfort.

        I'm imagining that we'll get half a dozen of those low-slung folding
        beach chairs, where your butt is nearly in the sand, to use as our
        deck chairs -- lightweight, movable, nice back rest, etc. I may glue
        down a little strip of 1/2" x 1/2" a few inches in from the outer deck
        edges to give some purchase against sliding downhill when heeled.

        If people want to, we can pop the hatch and stick our legs down in the
        well, but it may turn out that we keep it closed most of the time, and
        open it only to get the clam rakes out, or diving gear, or the extra
        cooler, etc. Next summer, with luck, I'll let you know how it all works!

        Good luck. Let us know what you wind up doing.

        All best,
        Garth

        (Who in the last week had a marvelous chunk of progress, getting the
        foredeck on, the cabin roof on, and the cockpit deck on. Damn, it
        looks like a real boat now!)



        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "chrisbfeller" <chrisbfeller@y...> wrote:
        >
        > I am debating on making a full cockpit length self draining cockpit in
        > my Blobster rather than the Micro style cockpit drawn. I am doing
        > this because I want a longer foot well to accommodate more passengers
        > in comfort. To be self draining it will have to be no deeper than 10
        > maybe 12 inches. I have also thought about making this foot well not
        > self draining and about 14 inches deep and just put a bilge pump in
        > either end. I wondered what any of you might think of this.
        >
        > Thanks Chris
      • Chuck Leinweber
        Hi, Garth: Steve Fisher said you were making good progress. Glad to hear it. I m also glad to hear that you are going with the plans for the cockpit. I made
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 5, 2004
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          Hi, Garth:

          Steve Fisher said you were making good progress. Glad to hear it. I'm also
          glad to hear that you are going with the plans for the cockpit. I made the
          self-draining footwell, as you mentioned, but next time I would follow the
          plans. For the reasons you mention, and just because it's a lot less work.
          Also, I have yet to have water in the cockpit that needs draining and I have
          had the boat out in the gulf and in the bays in blustery choppy weather more
          than once.

          Another issue for Caprice and even more for Blobster is that if you get a
          crowd in these boats, the stern will drag and they will not perform at all
          well. If you want to sail a crowd, build an open boat so you can shift
          people around. These little cruisers don't really make good daysailers. Of
          course the Cormorant should be fine with your family, Garth.

          Chuck
          -----Original Message-----
          From: GarthAB [mailto:garth@...]
          Sent: Friday, November 05, 2004 9:49 AM
          To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Michalak] Re: Blobster cockpit question.



          Hi Chris --

          Early on, I had a similar inclination to change Cormorant's well to be
          longer and self-draining, and asked Jim if altering/cutting through
          the tops of the aft frames to accommodate it would weaken the
          structure. He didn't seem to think that was much of an issue, and
          basically said, if you want to, go ahead.

          I did think that if I cut out a rectangular chunk from the tops of the
          frames, I'd have to make more of the lower frame solid (as opposed to
          the open oval there is now) -- so storage issues arose -- i.e. how to
          access the aft space below the deck?

          I know Chuck made a draining-footwell modification to his Caprice, so
          you can get good advice there.

          I ultimately decided against changing it, as I wanted the big open
          platform for sleeping out under the stars, should such an occasion
          ever arise (i.e. not too cold, windy, dewy, rainy, or buggy). I've
          come up with a way to make the hatch very low-profile, so it only
          sticks up above the deck by about 1/8" or 1/4", so we can throw a few
          Thermarests down and sprawl out in comfort.

          I'm imagining that we'll get half a dozen of those low-slung folding
          beach chairs, where your butt is nearly in the sand, to use as our
          deck chairs -- lightweight, movable, nice back rest, etc. I may glue
          down a little strip of 1/2" x 1/2" a few inches in from the outer deck
          edges to give some purchase against sliding downhill when heeled.

          If people want to, we can pop the hatch and stick our legs down in the
          well, but it may turn out that we keep it closed most of the time, and
          open it only to get the clam rakes out, or diving gear, or the extra
          cooler, etc. Next summer, with luck, I'll let you know how it all works!

          Good luck. Let us know what you wind up doing.

          All best,
          Garth

          (Who in the last week had a marvelous chunk of progress, getting the
          foredeck on, the cabin roof on, and the cockpit deck on. Damn, it
          looks like a real boat now!)



          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "chrisbfeller" <chrisbfeller@y...> wrote:
          >
          > I am debating on making a full cockpit length self draining cockpit in
          > my Blobster rather than the Micro style cockpit drawn. I am doing
          > this because I want a longer foot well to accommodate more passengers
          > in comfort. To be self draining it will have to be no deeper than 10
          > maybe 12 inches. I have also thought about making this foot well not
          > self draining and about 14 inches deep and just put a bilge pump in
          > either end. I wondered what any of you might think of this.
          >
          > Thanks Chris




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        • chrisbfeller
          ... be ... the ... to ... to ... so ... few ... deck ... the ... and ... works! ... cockpit in ... passengers ... than 10 ... not ... in ... Garth, I am
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 5, 2004
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            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "GarthAB" <garth@b...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Chris --
            >
            > Early on, I had a similar inclination to change Cormorant's well to
            be
            > longer and self-draining, and asked Jim if altering/cutting through
            > the tops of the aft frames to accommodate it would weaken the
            > structure. He didn't seem to think that was much of an issue, and
            > basically said, if you want to, go ahead.
            >
            > I did think that if I cut out a rectangular chunk from the tops of
            the
            > frames, I'd have to make more of the lower frame solid (as opposed
            to
            > the open oval there is now) -- so storage issues arose -- i.e. how
            to
            > access the aft space below the deck?
            >
            > I know Chuck made a draining-footwell modification to his Caprice,
            so
            > you can get good advice there.
            >
            > I ultimately decided against changing it, as I wanted the big open
            > platform for sleeping out under the stars, should such an occasion
            > ever arise (i.e. not too cold, windy, dewy, rainy, or buggy). I've
            > come up with a way to make the hatch very low-profile, so it only
            > sticks up above the deck by about 1/8" or 1/4", so we can throw a
            few
            > Thermarests down and sprawl out in comfort.
            >
            > I'm imagining that we'll get half a dozen of those low-slung folding
            > beach chairs, where your butt is nearly in the sand, to use as our
            > deck chairs -- lightweight, movable, nice back rest, etc. I may glue
            > down a little strip of 1/2" x 1/2" a few inches in from the outer
            deck
            > edges to give some purchase against sliding downhill when heeled.
            >
            > If people want to, we can pop the hatch and stick our legs down in
            the
            > well, but it may turn out that we keep it closed most of the time,
            and
            > open it only to get the clam rakes out, or diving gear, or the extra
            > cooler, etc. Next summer, with luck, I'll let you know how it all
            works!
            >
            > Good luck. Let us know what you wind up doing.
            >
            > All best,
            > Garth
            >
            > (Who in the last week had a marvelous chunk of progress, getting the
            > foredeck on, the cabin roof on, and the cockpit deck on. Damn, it
            > looks like a real boat now!)
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "chrisbfeller" <chrisbfeller@y...>
            wrote:
            > >
            > > I am debating on making a full cockpit length self draining
            cockpit in
            > > my Blobster rather than the Micro style cockpit drawn. I am doing
            > > this because I want a longer foot well to accommodate more
            passengers
            > > in comfort. To be self draining it will have to be no deeper
            than 10
            > > maybe 12 inches. I have also thought about making this foot well
            not
            > > self draining and about 14 inches deep and just put a bilge pump
            in
            > > either end. I wondered what any of you might think of this.
            > >
            > > Thanks Chris

            Garth,
            I am interested in how you made the hatch low profile. I think
            this would really help make the cockpit more comfortable.

            Chris
          • GarthAB
            ... Hi Chris -- I haven t actually made this hatch yet, mind you. I just got my decking on. But here s how it s designed in my fevered brain (I hope can
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 5, 2004
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              > Garth,
              > I am interested in how you made the hatch low profile. I think
              > this would really help make the cockpit more comfortable.
              >
              > Chris


              Hi Chris --

              I haven't actually made this hatch yet, mind you. I just got my
              decking on. But here's how it's designed in my fevered brain (I hope
              can adequately describe this):
              OK, so when you build the framing for the cockpit deck you have
              these 2x4s running longitudinally and crosswise, notched into each
              other, with 1/2" ply decking over all of it but the central square of
              nine.
              When you lay your plywood decking down on the 2x4s, you leave one
              half of the width of the 2x4 around the hatch opening uncovered. I.e.
              3/4" of undecked 2x4 surrounds the hole, sitting 1/2" lower than the
              decktop.
              So you can lay a piece of ply into that hole as your hatch-top,
              and have it rest on the lip of 2x4. Closed-cell-foam-weatherstrip the
              2x4 lip, and you have a pretty good seal. Now the problem is, how to
              keep the hatch in place?
              I'm planning to glue and screw 1x4s on edge to underside of the
              hatch-top, 3/4" (+ a whisker) inside of the edge, so these 1x4s slide
              down parallel to the 2x4s holding up your deck, just clearing them as
              the hatch goes on.
              Then I'll put a removable 5" deckplate (probably clear, to let in
              some light into the hold) in the center of the hatchtop. This sticks
              up maybe 1/8".
              I'll devise some sort of spring-loaded latches to click in each
              edge of the 1x4s and bolt/latch them to the 2x4 framing. Right now I'm
              looking at nylon "elbow catches" -- though I thing even nails sprung
              into matching holes by rubber bands might work. This is the weakest
              part of the plan so far, but I'm sure I'll figure out something to do
              the job.
              To open hatch, unscrew deckplate, reach in and pull on two crossed
              cords that lead to two pairs of spring-loaded latches on all 4 sides,
              pull to unlatch, lift out hatch.
              Finally, up on top of my hatch, I'll use a metal or wood strip
              holding down a solid rubber weather-strip flap type thing (door sweep?
              or even a piece of bicycle inner-tube laid flat) to seal water out of
              the hatch-edge, basically pre-protection for the seal that already
              exists at the lip.
              Also a 1/8" thick x 1" piece glued flat around the outside of the
              hatch hole up top, to keep rainwater from running into the hatch-edge
              opening. Then the rubber flap could lie flat over that thin piece of
              wood, maybe with a little overhang like a roof.

              Whew! Make any sense at all? It'll be easy to make -- it's just hard
              to describe. The removable deckplate was the real revelation -- allows
              you to have your latching mechanism underneath, so no need to raise
              the hatch up and bungee it down.
              Holler if any of this doesn't make sense, or if you see a fatal
              flaw in the design . . .

              All best,
              Garth
            • GarthAB
              Hi Chris -- I checked the Blobster layout on Duckworks and notice that you don t have as many bulkheads back there as Cormorant does (I should ve known) -- so
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 5, 2004
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                Hi Chris --

                I checked the Blobster layout on Duckworks and notice that you don't
                have as many bulkheads back there as Cormorant does (I should've
                known) -- so my remark about "the center square of nine" doesn't
                apply. But you'd still be able to do the sort of hatch I describe,
                jusr adding a single piece of 2x4 framing between your 2
                longitudinals, at the aft edge of the hatch. Everything else follows
                from there.

                Other thought is that the deckplate installation could be recessed
                1/8" with a router and you'd *really* have a flat layout.

                All best,
                Garth
              • chrisbfeller
                ... Garth, That sounds really good. I think I will do something like that instead. I think I will lengthen the hatch to four feet because I want a large foot
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 5, 2004
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                  --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "GarthAB" <garth@b...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > > Garth,
                  > > I am interested in how you made the hatch low profile. I think
                  > > this would really help make the cockpit more comfortable.
                  > >
                  > > Chris
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi Chris --
                  >
                  > I haven't actually made this hatch yet, mind you. I just got my
                  > decking on. But here's how it's designed in my fevered brain (I hope
                  > can adequately describe this):
                  > OK, so when you build the framing for the cockpit deck you have
                  > these 2x4s running longitudinally and crosswise, notched into each
                  > other, with 1/2" ply decking over all of it but the central square of
                  > nine.
                  > When you lay your plywood decking down on the 2x4s, you leave one
                  > half of the width of the 2x4 around the hatch opening uncovered. I.e.
                  > 3/4" of undecked 2x4 surrounds the hole, sitting 1/2" lower than the
                  > decktop.
                  > So you can lay a piece of ply into that hole as your hatch-top,
                  > and have it rest on the lip of 2x4. Closed-cell-foam-weatherstrip the
                  > 2x4 lip, and you have a pretty good seal. Now the problem is, how to
                  > keep the hatch in place?
                  > I'm planning to glue and screw 1x4s on edge to underside of the
                  > hatch-top, 3/4" (+ a whisker) inside of the edge, so these 1x4s slide
                  > down parallel to the 2x4s holding up your deck, just clearing them as
                  > the hatch goes on.
                  > Then I'll put a removable 5" deckplate (probably clear, to let in
                  > some light into the hold) in the center of the hatchtop. This sticks
                  > up maybe 1/8".
                  > I'll devise some sort of spring-loaded latches to click in each
                  > edge of the 1x4s and bolt/latch them to the 2x4 framing. Right now I'm
                  > looking at nylon "elbow catches" -- though I thing even nails sprung
                  > into matching holes by rubber bands might work. This is the weakest
                  > part of the plan so far, but I'm sure I'll figure out something to do
                  > the job.
                  > To open hatch, unscrew deckplate, reach in and pull on two crossed
                  > cords that lead to two pairs of spring-loaded latches on all 4 sides,
                  > pull to unlatch, lift out hatch.
                  > Finally, up on top of my hatch, I'll use a metal or wood strip
                  > holding down a solid rubber weather-strip flap type thing (door sweep?
                  > or even a piece of bicycle inner-tube laid flat) to seal water out of
                  > the hatch-edge, basically pre-protection for the seal that already
                  > exists at the lip.
                  > Also a 1/8" thick x 1" piece glued flat around the outside of the
                  > hatch hole up top, to keep rainwater from running into the hatch-edge
                  > opening. Then the rubber flap could lie flat over that thin piece of
                  > wood, maybe with a little overhang like a roof.
                  >
                  > Whew! Make any sense at all? It'll be easy to make -- it's just hard
                  > to describe. The removable deckplate was the real revelation -- allows
                  > you to have your latching mechanism underneath, so no need to raise
                  > the hatch up and bungee it down.
                  > Holler if any of this doesn't make sense, or if you see a fatal
                  > flaw in the design . . .
                  >
                  > All best,
                  > Garth

                  Garth,
                  That sounds really good. I think I will do something like that
                  instead. I think I will lengthen the hatch to four feet because I
                  want a large foot well and maybe put a floor below to bridge the
                  center frame. I guess the only tricky part is getting a water tight
                  seal around the hatch. Thanks for the detailed info.

                  Chris
                • David Davis
                  The removable deckplate was the real revelation -- allows ... Great Idea Garth!! A groove cut in the underside of the hatch cover fitted with an O ring (
                  Message 8 of 9 , Nov 5, 2004
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                    The removable deckplate was the real revelation -- allows
                    > you to have your latching mechanism underneath, so no need to raise
                    > the hatch up and bungee it down.
                    >
                    > All best,
                    > Garth

                    Great Idea Garth!!

                    A groove cut in the underside of the hatch cover fitted with an O
                    ring ( screen door spline or windshield washer hose) might make a
                    great seal. The area needs to be glassed well -- I think it's main
                    function will end up being to keep the rain water out of the boat.

                    Have you thought on how or if you want to lock up the hatch?? The
                    under seat area might be about the best place to store and lock up
                    an out board motor.

                    Another option is to raise an grid like deck cover that makes the
                    deck level with the raised hatch cover. This option might keep the
                    boat cushions, etc out of rain water or any water that slops aboard.

                    Another option is to just live with the raised hatch -- I think the
                    deck chairs legs etc could be modified to set on or over the hatch.

                    David Davis
                  • GarthAB
                    ... Hi David -- It would be pretty easy to rig a padlock under the hatch cover. It would be reachable from the deckplate, so you wouldn t have to crawl down
                    Message 9 of 9 , Nov 6, 2004
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                      > Have you thought on how or if you want to lock up the hatch?? The
                      > under seat area might be about the best place to store and lock up
                      > an out board motor.


                      Hi David --

                      It would be pretty easy to rig a padlock under the hatch cover. It
                      would be reachable from the deckplate, so you wouldn't have to crawl
                      down under to unlock it. Catch two sides of the hatch with a metal bar
                      that slides through two sets of brackets, etc. Again, I haven't fully
                      envisioned this part, but I think it could be easily arranged with one
                      trip to the hardware store . . .

                      Of course, anyone who REALLY wanted to get into your hatch or into
                      your boat could do it easily -- crowbar, sledgehammer, sawzall,
                      chainsaw, etc. You just have to hope to you get (if any) only
                      half-hearted, lazy, opportunistic thieves.

                      All best,
                      Garth


                      All best,
                      Garth
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