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Re: [Michalak] Digest Number 922

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  • Barry Rosen
    Dear List, Following on the discussion about outboards, I wanted to throw in a different question. For a small boat like an IMB, a jewelbox jr, or some other
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 3, 2004
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      Dear List,
      Following on the discussion about outboards, I wanted to throw in a
      different question.

      For a small boat like an IMB, a jewelbox jr, or some other daysailer, I
      gather people use engines in the 2-4 HP range. I priced them and a new one
      cost between $700-$1000. For this price you can get a very heavy duty
      trolling motor, 24 v, 100 lbs thrust with all electronic wireless remote
      control. If the boat was primarily for sailing in local waters, the motor
      as an auxillary, what would be the relative advantages of electric versus
      gas?
      Thanks,
      Barry Rosen
    • sacalman
      Hi Barry, I have several OB s I use to move my Lightning around(19 6 and 700# empty... closer to 1400# with the family and all gear) when not under sail.
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 3, 2004
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        Hi Barry,

        I have several OB's I use to move my Lightning around(19'6" and 700#
        empty... closer to 1400# with the family and all gear) when not under
        sail. After many hard starts, noise and smoke clouds I got fed up and
        bought a Minn Kota 12v 70# thrust trolling motor for those days when
        I don't see the need for dragging along something for long runs. With
        the Minn Kota at half throttle I can get close to two hours from a
        single Interstate deep cycle battery without discharging it past 50%.
        Mostly though I just use it to get on and off the trailer and out of
        the tiny little basin where the boat ramp is. Mine is a basic model
        with the controls on the tiller and a piece of PVC with a hose clamp
        as a "tiller extension".

        I think that if your plan is to use a motor infrequently and for
        those little trips like the ramp stuff then a trolling motor is just
        the ticket.

        Keep in mind though that batteries need proper care if you want them
        to last so: Buy a good quality deep cycle, Buy the biggest one you
        can carry. Stick to good brands, Interstate is my favorite I have had
        them last 6 years. Trojans are real good too. Don't by an Exide, they
        are junk. If possible, keep from discharging the battery below 50%.
        (Wallyworld has a Minn Kota meter for $15.00 and I checked mine
        against a specific gravity battery guage and it IS accurate. Spend
        the money for a GOOD charger. What you want is an intellegent charger
        that has the ability to monitor the charge and lower the rate of amps
        to a very low trickle to keep the battery fully charged.

        Battery killers are: Running them below 50% on a regular basis.
        Keeping them on a charger all the time(except a float charger).
        Leaving them in a discharged state.

        Also, put it in a battery box and strap it down up forward in the
        boat for better trim and safety. By safety I mean that you don't want
        the battery moving when you turn turtle in a nice wind.

        Scott Calman


        Also,

        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Barry Rosen <brosen1953@o...> wrote:
        > Dear List,
        > Following on the discussion about outboards, I wanted to throw in a
        > different question.
        >
        > For a small boat like an IMB, a jewelbox jr, or some other
        daysailer, I
        > gather people use engines in the 2-4 HP range. I priced them and a
        new one
        > cost between $700-$1000. For this price you can get a very heavy
        duty
        > trolling motor, 24 v, 100 lbs thrust with all electronic wireless
        remote
        > control. If the boat was primarily for sailing in local waters,
        the motor
        > as an auxillary, what would be the relative advantages of electric
        versus
        > gas?
        > Thanks,
        > Barry Rosen
      • jhkohnen@boat-links.com
        Electric s biggest advantage is QUIET! Quiet is a Very Good Thing in a boat. You also don t have to mess around to start an electric motor, and it always
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 4, 2004
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          Electric's biggest advantage is QUIET! Quiet is a Very Good Thing in a
          boat. You also don't have to mess around to start an electric motor, and it
          always starts. A gas engine's advantage is range, the "fuel" for an electric
          motor is heavy and bulky, it takes a long time to refuel and you have to
          find an electrical outlet. A gas engine will most likely also push a boat
          faster than a trolling motor, since trolling motor props are "geared" for
          high thrust and low speeds.

          I usually use a trolling motor for an auxiliary. One group 24 deep-cycle
          battery is enough to get me from one end of the local mudhole to the other
          in a pinch, and that's all I need. I rarely use it at all, but I know if I
          didn't take it along I'd surely get stuck in a calm four miles from the
          ramp. <g>

          On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 12:04:46 -0400, Barry R wrote:
          > ...
          > If the boat was primarily for sailing in local waters, the motor
          > as an auxillary, what would be the relative advantages of electric versus
          > gas?

          --
          John <jkohnen@...>
          http://www.boat-links.com/
          A paranoid is a man who knows a little of what's going on.
          <William Burroughs>
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