Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Maiden voyage

Expand Messages
  • vexatious2001
    Met-up with Jim Michalak this afternoon and launched the AF3 on Carlyle Lake in central Illinois for her first sail. Jim took some photos with a digital camera
    Message 1 of 6 , May 4, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Met-up with Jim Michalak this afternoon and launched
      the AF3 on Carlyle Lake in central Illinois for her
      first sail.

      Jim took some photos with a digital camera that has a
      few problems; I have posted 4 of those photos to the
      AF3 album. We also took about 17 or 18 photos with
      a 35 mm, and I will have the film developed and put
      on a disk, so I will have more photos in about 5 days.

      Winds were light and variable, so we did not get any
      "heavy-weather" testing in, but Jim took the boat out
      and said it was encouraging the way she handled "light
      air."

      I don't have much experience sailing, but I did not have
      any problems "going" were I wanted to go.

      For those who came in late, rather than a single 52"
      leeboard, my boat has twin 41" boards. Jim tried sailing
      with one board down and two boards down and said, in these
      conditons, he really couldn't see any difference in the
      performance.

      Jim has been in Richard's AF2 but this was the first AF3 he
      had seen "in the flesh." About the first thing he said
      after climbing in, was that the AF3 is quite a bit smaller
      than the AF2. We both agree that, for overnighting, the
      af3 is really best as a solo boat. Two people would be
      a real, real squeeze in the cabin, and the cockpit is
      really too short to stretch out in. Now, if one wanted
      to pack a tent and sleep on shore, the AF3 will haul a
      bunch of gear for "beach camping." And it's big enough
      to "day-sail" 2 or maybe 3 people, although to keep
      the transom out of the water, someones gonna have to
      ride forward of the companionway bulkhead.

      I originally intended to lace the sail to the mast and
      not use a halyard. I have now installed a block at the head
      of the mast and had a halyard today. The sail was held to
      the mast with large plastic cable-ties. We did not try
      reefing with this set-up, and when it came time to go
      home, we left the sail up and rolled it up against the
      mast, so I don't know how well this set-up will work. I may
      end up using a continues lacing to hold the sail to the mast.

      Despite the fact that I test-ran the little 1 1/2 hp 1949
      outboard for 20 minutes in the barrel this morning, it
      refused to run more than a minute or two on the lake:
      something cutting-off the fuel flow, so I have a gas tank,
      fuel lines, and maybe a carb to clean this week. When
      it was running, 1 1/2 hp was plenty for the AF3. We tried
      running one of Jim's 2 hp engines and it did not go any faster.
      I think the 1 1/2 pretty-much gets the AF3 up to hull speed.

      Need to add more lead to the rudder blade; it floats up to
      about a 40 degree angle, but steering was still good. I do
      have a rudder blade about 4 inches longer than drawn, with
      a big foot-hole cut in it for reboarding after a capsize.

      Also need to work on fairleads for the sheet, which was always
      wrapping itslef around something. I think I know what I will
      do about that.

      Overall, I am real satisfied with the boat so far. Hope to
      do an overnighter within the next few weeks.

      Still need to finish the slot cover and the polytarp
      sail. The sail we used today was from Jim's old Jinni.


      Max
    • petersimmons55409
      ... Congratulations, Max Boat looks great. Thanks for the pics, too. I ll be launching my own AF3 in about a week and a half, so it s inspiring to see a
      Message 2 of 6 , May 4, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In Michalak@y..., "vexatious2001" <cadbury@s...> wrote:
        > Met-up with Jim Michalak this afternoon and launched
        > the AF3 on Carlyle Lake in central Illinois for her
        > first sail.
        >

        Congratulations, Max
        Boat looks great. Thanks for the pics, too. I'll be
        launching my own AF3 in about a week and a half, so
        it's inspiring to see a brand new one fresh from
        the lumber pile. As is well-understood here, there are
        few experiences as good as launching a boat one has
        built. I feel you, my brother.
        Pete
      • Luke S
        Congratulations Max, The Campjon had its maiden today as well. Everything went fine, the boat handled the wakes of several fools quite easily, coped with the
        Message 3 of 6 , May 5, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          Congratulations Max,
          The Campjon had its maiden today as well. Everything went fine, the boat handled the wakes of several fools quite easily, coped with the wind, coped nicely with a mild chop and all of this with a 2.5 hp two stroke. Speed was as expected, a reasonable jog. I am still going to buy a bigger motor, it needs it. Pictures to come soon.
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: vexatious2001
          To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, May 05, 2002 11:52 AM
          Subject: [Michalak] Maiden voyage


          Met-up with Jim Michalak this afternoon and launched
          the AF3 on Carlyle Lake in central Illinois for her
          first sail.

          >snip


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • paxton_consulting
          A hearty congratulations, Max! She looks great on the water, and is clearly a boat you can have lots of fun with. I hope you enjoy sailing. I ve found it to
          Message 4 of 6 , May 5, 2002
          • 0 Attachment
            A hearty congratulations, Max! She looks great on the water, and is
            clearly a boat you can have lots of fun with. I hope you enjoy
            sailing. I've found it to be like nothing else I've done.

            Bill Paxton

            --- In Michalak@y..., "vexatious2001" <cadbury@s...> wrote:
            > Met-up with Jim Michalak this afternoon and launched
            > the AF3 on Carlyle Lake in central Illinois for her
            > first sail.
            >
            > Jim took some photos with a digital camera that has a
            > few problems; I have posted 4 of those photos to the
            > AF3 album. We also took about 17 or 18 photos with
            > a 35 mm, and I will have the film developed and put
            > on a disk, so I will have more photos in about 5 days.
            >
            > Winds were light and variable, so we did not get any
            > "heavy-weather" testing in, but Jim took the boat out
            > and said it was encouraging the way she handled "light
            > air."
            >
            > I don't have much experience sailing, but I did not have
            > any problems "going" were I wanted to go.
            >
            > For those who came in late, rather than a single 52"
            > leeboard, my boat has twin 41" boards. Jim tried sailing
            > with one board down and two boards down and said, in these
            > conditons, he really couldn't see any difference in the
            > performance.
            >
            > Jim has been in Richard's AF2 but this was the first AF3 he
            > had seen "in the flesh." About the first thing he said
            > after climbing in, was that the AF3 is quite a bit smaller
            > than the AF2. We both agree that, for overnighting, the
            > af3 is really best as a solo boat. Two people would be
            > a real, real squeeze in the cabin, and the cockpit is
            > really too short to stretch out in. Now, if one wanted
            > to pack a tent and sleep on shore, the AF3 will haul a
            > bunch of gear for "beach camping." And it's big enough
            > to "day-sail" 2 or maybe 3 people, although to keep
            > the transom out of the water, someones gonna have to
            > ride forward of the companionway bulkhead.
            >
            > I originally intended to lace the sail to the mast and
            > not use a halyard. I have now installed a block at the head
            > of the mast and had a halyard today. The sail was held to
            > the mast with large plastic cable-ties. We did not try
            > reefing with this set-up, and when it came time to go
            > home, we left the sail up and rolled it up against the
            > mast, so I don't know how well this set-up will work. I may
            > end up using a continues lacing to hold the sail to the mast.
            >
            > Despite the fact that I test-ran the little 1 1/2 hp 1949
            > outboard for 20 minutes in the barrel this morning, it
            > refused to run more than a minute or two on the lake:
            > something cutting-off the fuel flow, so I have a gas tank,
            > fuel lines, and maybe a carb to clean this week. When
            > it was running, 1 1/2 hp was plenty for the AF3. We tried
            > running one of Jim's 2 hp engines and it did not go any faster.
            > I think the 1 1/2 pretty-much gets the AF3 up to hull speed.
            >
            > Need to add more lead to the rudder blade; it floats up to
            > about a 40 degree angle, but steering was still good. I do
            > have a rudder blade about 4 inches longer than drawn, with
            > a big foot-hole cut in it for reboarding after a capsize.
            >
            > Also need to work on fairleads for the sheet, which was always
            > wrapping itslef around something. I think I know what I will
            > do about that.
            >
            > Overall, I am real satisfied with the boat so far. Hope to
            > do an overnighter within the next few weeks.
            >
            > Still need to finish the slot cover and the polytarp
            > sail. The sail we used today was from Jim's old Jinni.
            >
            >
            > Max
          • paxton_consulting
            Nice going, Luke! The Campjon is a fascinating adventure machine. I look forward to hearing your upcoming tales. Bill ... boat handled the wakes of several
            Message 5 of 6 , May 5, 2002
            • 0 Attachment
              Nice going, Luke! The Campjon is a fascinating adventure machine. I
              look forward to hearing your upcoming tales.

              Bill

              --- In Michalak@y..., "Luke S" <lukesp@b...> wrote:
              > Congratulations Max,
              > The Campjon had its maiden today as well. Everything went fine, the
              boat handled the wakes of several fools quite easily, coped with the
              wind, coped nicely with a mild chop and all of this with a 2.5 hp two
              stroke. Speed was as expected, a reasonable jog. I am still going to
              buy a bigger motor, it needs it. Pictures to come soon.
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: vexatious2001
              > To: Michalak@y...
              > Sent: Sunday, May 05, 2002 11:52 AM
              > Subject: [Michalak] Maiden voyage
              >
              >
              > Met-up with Jim Michalak this afternoon and launched
              > the AF3 on Carlyle Lake in central Illinois for her
              > first sail.
              >
              > >snip
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Luke S
              Oooh ! Tales to tell ? The launch went fine but the journey out of the creek we launched in was hampered by a fishtrap float wrapping its line around the prop.
              Message 6 of 6 , May 6, 2002
              • 0 Attachment
                Oooh ! Tales to tell ? The launch went fine but the journey out of the creek we launched in was hampered by a fishtrap float wrapping its line around the prop. I felt rather stupid until I noticed the float was a dark muddy green, the same colour as the water . Some people are dumb, you know ? The law states they must be white or a bright flourescent colour. Nevermind, on we go.

                My friend insisted we go down a long inlet in the mangroves so we did. It became so shallow that we couldn't use the prop and resorted to a pair of paddles I brought along, forgetting it was a falling tide and that the wind was behind us. Campjon floats on 2 inches of water which helped to deceive us further. I soon realised we were going to be trapped by the tide if we went any further, but too late. It took a half hour to drag the boat out by its painter , me in knee deep mud with cramping feet. Yow. Thats OK, we need to test the boat and this was testing I guess.

                So we were out of the mud and started the motor, but it didn't like starting and before we knew it the wind (which was having a good time I'm sure) took great pleasure in sending us back to where we came from while we beat the surrounding mud to a froth with our paddles in a desperate attempt to stop this. Oh well. We finally got out of there.

                Then it was on to a nice part of Bribie island where we beached the boat and took some pictures and recovered, had a few test drives solo etc. I must say that Campjon turns on a dime, surprisingly so. I was always told that square boats need a larger turning area than conventional (i.e. v-bottomed) boats, not so in this case. The rest of the day was spent pleasantly enough, travelling down the Skids, a rather narrow shallow section of the Bribie passage filled with small mangrove islands and multiple passages. The folding chairs I had brought along were a blessing for my aching mudcaked back, and we saw some fascinating nooks and crannies along the way. I made a mental note to visit them in the future.

                I then made the mistake of laughing at some guy in a speedboat who had ignored the channel beacons and was creating his own channel with his prop, sending a rooster tail of mud into the air. He didn't appreciate my smile so away he went, to turn around and charge back at me at full speed and pass as close as he dare. Three times he did this and I can safely say that Campjon copes rather well with large wakes from speed boats. The lesson here is to never laugh at the psychotic, no matter how foolish he looks. If not for his sake then maybe for the sake of the three children he had on board, the ones with the wide eyes. If his boat had a registration number I would have reported him.

                So, to sum up. Campjon is a fine little boat and quite capable of the task of boating, regardless of the dumb places I take it.
                And yes, I succeeded in removing all the sticky black mud from the interior . Damn the mangroves and that stupid shallow inlet.

                I'm itching to go solo camping in it , Some very nice places here to try out.

                Luke S

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: paxton_consulting
                To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, May 06, 2002 5:36 AM
                Subject: [Michalak] Re: Maiden voyage


                Nice going, Luke! The Campjon is a fascinating adventure machine. I
                look forward to hearing your upcoming tales.

                Bill




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.