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Re: [Michalak] old newspapers

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  • John B. Trussell
    Our British cousins refer to fiberglass as glass re-enforced plastic or GRP. Around the turn of the century (early 1900 s), there was some experimentation
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 7, 2004
      Our British cousins refer to fiberglass as "glass re-enforced plastic" or GRP. Around the turn of the century (early 1900's), there was some experimentation with "paper canoes" which used varnish to laminate several layers of paper over a male mold. They did not have access to glass cloth and varnish was the best resin/plastic available. I suppose one could use newspaper and epoxy in a similiar fashion, but given the availability of plywood, glass cloth, and epoxy, I'm not sure why anyone would want to. As far as I'm concerned, the paper canoes were an interesting historical precursor to modern fiberglass construction (which is not particularly suitable for one off construction).

      John T
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: twgardne@...
      To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2004 12:21 PM
      Subject: Re: [Michalak] old newspapers


      I believe that Wojtek has seen some photos of someone finishing the brightwork
      on their boat with newspapers taped in the appropriate place to keep finish
      drips off the already completed sides of the boat....

      Quoting John Bell <smallboatdesigner@...>:

      > I don't think I've ever heard of anyone recommending sticking newspaper
      > to
      > one's hull instead of fiberglass. It would almost certainly be a messy
      > process with a messy result with no benefits that I can think of.
      >
      > MDO plywood is coated with a paper facing, but it comes from the
      > factory
      > that way. Perhaps that is what is confusing you.
      >
      > There is practically no way you could acheive the same result by
      > epoxying
      > paper to the surface regular plywood. The cost of fiberglass cloth isn't
      > so
      > prohibitive that anyone who had any sense would eschew it in favor of
      > dubious substances like newspaper, old panty hose, your mother's
      > parlor
      > curtains, etc.
      >
      > JB
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "wwbaginski" <citystudio@...>
      > To: <Michalak@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2004 5:50 AM
      > Subject: [Michalak] old newspapers
      >
      >
      > > Hi. Some of you use old (I think so) newspapers while glassing
      > > bottoms or sides of your boats. It seems to me to be a stage between
      > > epoxying only and epoxying with a fiberglass? What are the
      > > advantages of that technology?
      > >
      > > -Wojtek
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
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    • Al
      As far as I m concerned, the ... I could see an application for it if one were building a skin on frame type of boat and replaced the designed skin with the
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 8, 2004
        As far as I'm concerned, the
        > paper canoes were an interesting historical
        > precursor to modern fiberglass construction (which
        > is not particularly suitable for one off
        > construction).

        I could see an application for it if one were building
        a skin on frame type of boat and replaced the designed
        skin with the paper/epoxy one, but the mechanical
        properties of paper are pathetic.

        If one were going to go down that route, using cotton
        bed sheets would be far more efficient.

        Al





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      • Chuck Leinweber
        ... Actually, cotton canvas works well for a skin on frame boat, but you don t need any epoxy - plain old house paint works great.
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 8, 2004
          > If one were going to go down that route, using cotton
          > bed sheets would be far more efficient.
          >
          > Al

          Actually, cotton canvas works well for a skin on frame boat, but you don't
          need any epoxy - plain old house paint works great.

          http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/r/projects/sof/

          http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/r/projects/sof/update1.htm

          chuck
        • M Wilson
          If anyone is interested there is a great deal of info to be had on the internet about this interesting period in history. These paper boats were used by many
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 10, 2004
            If anyone is interested there is a great deal of info to be had on the internet about this interesting period in history. These paper boats were used by many raceing teams includeing Harvard. I am on a trip away from home right now so I don't have access to my notes but I believ e that a company started by father and son , Waters in the mid 1860's in Troy, New York made these boats. They have a museum in Troy. There are only four of these known boats to be in exsistance today.When I return from my trip in about 1 month, I will check my notes. I found the history of this period of paper boat building very interesting.
            Marc

            "John B. Trussell" <John.Trussell@...> wrote:
            Our British cousins refer to fiberglass as "glass re-enforced plastic" or GRP. Around the turn of the century (early 1900's), there was some experimentation with "paper canoes" which used varnish to laminate several layers of paper over a male mold. They did not have access to glass cloth and varnish was the best resin/plastic available. I suppose one could to. As far as I'm concerned, the paper canoes were an interesting historical precursor to modern fiberglass construction (which is not particularly suitable for one off construction).



            Life is not a journey to the grave with the intent of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaim -- WOW -- What a Ride!


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