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Linseed oil

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  • David Davis
    Will repeated coats of the linseed oil be a appropriate finish on the tiller and spars. I have made the tiller with an ash-plywood- ash lamination, will the
    Message 1 of 13 , Feb 25, 2004
      Will repeated coats of the linseed oil be a appropriate finish on
      the tiller and spars. I have made the tiller with an ash-plywood-
      ash lamination, will the linseed oil adversly effect the glue in the
      plywood? In the earlier discussion linseed oil seemed to be OK for
      solid wood but nothing was mentioned about plywood.

      David Davis
    • Charles Pulley
      I know with teak spearguns, the teak being a fairly oily wood in it s own right, the wood should be reoiled after every couple of uses unless you just like the
      Message 2 of 13 , Feb 26, 2004
        I know with teak spearguns, the teak being a fairly oily wood in it's own right, the wood should be reoiled after every couple of uses unless you just like the looks of silver wood when the oil leaches out during use. Granted a speargun and a boat get used differently, but they both get wet. The spearguns get used for a few hours then are taken out of the water, rinsed with freshwater, dried and put away, while the boats I've had experience with back home get left in the water for days at a time and putting them away is considered parking them on the trailer in the yard. Be that as it may, I think oiled wood looks very pretty and an oiled boat would look fabulous. Personnaly, I would rather not cover wood by painting unless I was trying to cover up mars or imperfections.

        "The way I heard it was apply Linseed oil:

        Once a day for a week.
        Once a week for a month.
        Once a month for a year.

        Then once a year thereafter.

        hal"

        When doing this can the boat be used during the process, or would that just muck up the whole works?

        the other, other Chuck :o)



        David Davis <sharpie3444@...> wrote:
        Will repeated coats of the linseed oil be a appropriate finish on
        the tiller and spars. I have made the tiller with an ash-plywood-
        ash lamination, will the linseed oil adversly effect the glue in the
        plywood? In the earlier discussion linseed oil seemed to be OK for
        solid wood but nothing was mentioned about plywood.

        David Davis


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      • Bruce Hector
        We used a secret recipe of goop on our bare wood cottage walls in Canada for over 10 years. My Dad made it up, the main ingredient was Boiled Linseed Oil ,
        Message 3 of 13 , Feb 26, 2004
          We used a secret recipe of goop on our bare wood cottage walls in
          Canada for over 10 years.

          My Dad made it up, the main ingredient was "Boiled Linseed Oil", and !
          know he added a little turpentine. I can't remember proportions or if
          there was anything else in it. We put the cottage up on 1969 and he
          died in '79.

          We'd slop this mix on every summer and it looked great, the wood never
          rotted or split. Eventually there were lines of rust staining
          vertically downwards from the nail heads. So after dad died, we
          painted it it.

          It's 33 years old now, just pine sheeting, and the wood is still perfect.

          I also used boiled linseed oil on gunstocks with gret results.

          Bruce Hector
          I don't know how it would effect the glues in the ply or the epoxy.
          But it will penetrate right through a 1 inch plank.
          Should be a fine looking finish on a long ship though!
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/viking-ship-plans/
        • roswellbill46
          I used a gunstock recipe in the 60s of 50/50 boiled linseed oil and turpentine. Apparently the the turp is to make it sink deep into the wood. Bill ...
          Message 4 of 13 , Feb 26, 2004
            I used a gunstock recipe in the '60s of 50/50 boiled linseed oil and
            turpentine. Apparently the the turp' is to make it sink deep into the
            wood.

            Bill


            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hector" <bruce_hector@h...> wrote:
            > We used a secret recipe of goop on our bare wood cottage walls in
            > Canada for over 10 years.
            >
            > My Dad made it up, the main ingredient was "Boiled Linseed Oil", and !
            > know he added a little turpentine. I can't remember proportions or if
            > there was anything else in it. We put the cottage up on 1969 and he
            > died in '79.
            >
            > We'd slop this mix on every summer and it looked great, the wood never
            > rotted or split. Eventually there were lines of rust staining
            > vertically downwards from the nail heads. So after dad died, we
            > painted it it.
            >
            > It's 33 years old now, just pine sheeting, and the wood is still
            perfect.
            >
            > I also used boiled linseed oil on gunstocks with gret results.
            >
            > Bruce Hector
            > I don't know how it would effect the glues in the ply or the epoxy.
            > But it will penetrate right through a 1 inch plank.
            > Should be a fine looking finish on a long ship though!
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/viking-ship-plans/
          • David Davis
            ... turpentine. ... Bruce, I am excited about the linseed oil and plan on using it on smaller projects to begin with. I want to make some blocks using ash for
            Message 5 of 13 , Feb 26, 2004
              --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hector" <bruce_hector@h...>
              wrote:
              > We used a secret recipe of goop on our bare wood cottage walls in
              > Canada for over 10 years. Boiled linseed ( flaxseed ?? ) and
              turpentine.
              >
              >
              >
              > I also used boiled linseed oil on gunstocks with great results.
              >
              > Bruce Hector

              > I don't know how it would effect the glues in the ply or the epoxy.
              > But it will penetrate right through a 1 inch plank.
              > Should be a fine looking finish on a long ship though!
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/viking-ship-plans/

              Bruce,

              I am excited about the linseed oil and plan on using it on smaller
              projects to begin with. I want to make some blocks using ash for the
              cheek plates, so I may just get enough linseed oil to soak the
              entire blocks in a gallon can. The wood may expand or twist out of
              shape but I may soak the wood before cutting it to final shape. (
              waste a little oil-I hate that!! )

              David Davis
            • hal
              ... Don t know for sure, so I will speculate. :^) I would think the boat could be used after the once a day for a week phase. There are people who are
              Message 6 of 13 , Feb 26, 2004
                On Feb 26, 2004, at 1:56 AM, Charles Pulley wrote:

                > "The way I heard it was apply Linseed oil:
                >
                > Once a day for a week.
                > Once a week for a month.
                > Once a month for a year.
                >
                > Then once a year thereafter.
                >
                > hal"
                >
                > When doing this can the boat be used during the process, or would that
                > just muck up the whole works?

                Don't know for sure, so I will speculate. :^)

                I would think the boat could be used after the "once
                a day for a week" phase. There are people who are
                smarter than I who can give a non-speculative answer.

                hal
              • Edward Bachmann
                In reading about how the old timers worked on the Chesapeake Bay back in the days of sail, they used a variety of things to protect the wood including linseed
                Message 7 of 13 , Feb 26, 2004
                  In reading about how the old timers worked on the Chesapeake Bay back in the days of sail, they used a variety of things to protect the wood including linseed oil and various tar mixes.

                  They also talked about "pickling" their boats. They would toss rock salt into the bilge to make their boats last longer. They knew that fresh water from rain sitting in the bilge was not good since it promotes rot.



                  >> On Feb 26, 2004, at 1:56 AM, Charles Pulley wrote:
                  > "The way I heard it was apply Linseed oil:
                  >
                  > Once a day for a week.
                  > Once a week for a month.
                  > Once a month for a year.
                  >
                  > Then once a year thereafter.
                  >
                  > hal"


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • antec007
                  Linseed Oil is Great Stuff. But, Linseed Oil is Very Dangerous. It Will spontaneously combust (That is Burst into Flames) more quickly than any other product
                  Message 8 of 13 , Feb 27, 2004
                    Linseed Oil is Great Stuff.

                    But, Linseed Oil is Very Dangerous.
                    It Will spontaneously combust (That is Burst into Flames) more
                    quickly than any other product we have used in our 30 years of
                    furniture building and finishing.

                    I think the warning "Don't leave oily rags laying around" was
                    written specify for Linseed Oil. It's no Joke, even if you have left
                    other oily rags laying around with no consequence Linseed Oil Rags
                    Will burst into flames.

                    We nearly burned our shop down years ago by leaving a Linseed oil rag
                    on a work table while we went to lunch.
                    We came back about a half hour later and the rag was smoking and Very
                    Hot.
                    That made Me a believer.

                    A fellow woodworker was not so lucky. He did lose his shop to a
                    Linseed Oil rag caused fire and nearly lost the historical building
                    he was working in.

                    Don't let a Linseed Oil rag out of you sight. Not even for a little
                    while.

                    As I said, Linseed Oil Is Great Stuff. We still use it, But use is
                    with Great Care and dispose of rags in a fire safe place, even if you
                    plan to "Come Right Back". You might "Come Fight Back" to a Fire.

                    Pat Patteson
                    Pioneer Furniture
                    Molalla, Oregon

                    My yearly Linseed Oil Warning Rant.
                    In a time of Warnings about Everything, this is Real.
                    It might prevent a fire.
                  • David
                    ... Thanks to my neighbor Pat for this crucial observation. His point cannot be ignored. If you do, there are very likely to be serious -perhaps even deadly-
                    Message 9 of 13 , Feb 27, 2004
                      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "antec007" <pateson@c...> wrote:
                      > Linseed Oil is Great Stuff.
                      >
                      > But, Linseed Oil is Very Dangerous.
                      > It Will spontaneously combust (That is Burst into Flames) more
                      > quickly than any other product we have used in our 30 years of
                      > furniture building and finishing. We still use it, But use is
                      > with Great Care and dispose of rags in a fire safe place, even if you
                      > plan to "Come Right Back". You might "Come Fight Back" to a Fire.
                      >
                      > Pat Patteson
                      > Pioneer Furniture
                      > Molalla, Oregon
                      >

                      >>>>>>ABSOLUTELY TRUE!!

                      Thanks to my neighbor Pat for this crucial observation. His point
                      cannot be ignored. If you do, there are very likely to be serious
                      -perhaps even deadly- consequences. Those of us in the woodworking
                      industry do indeed have a healthy respect for linseed oil use. If you
                      do use rags to apply linseed oil, there are three primary ways to
                      avoid a fire.
                      First - many books and fire prevention professionals recommend
                      submerging the used rags completely in water. This prevents oxygen
                      from reaching the rags. Linseed oil cures (as I understand it) by the
                      process of oxidation. It is capable of very rapid oxidation when
                      concentrated. That process of rapid oxidation is also know as "fire".
                      Second - you can dispose of the rags in a sealed garbage can, sold for
                      just this purpose, and typically foot-opened and painted bright red.
                      This also, theoretically, keeps oxygen away from the rags.
                      Finally - the typical way that most shops I've seen use. Take the oily
                      rags, open them up entirely, drape them over a rod or wide bar in such
                      a way as to maximize air circulation. This de-concentrates the oil,
                      substantially lessening the chances of spontaneous combustion. This is
                      what we do in our shop as a first step. Then we toss the rags in a
                      sealed container for disposal.

                      Very Sincerely,
                      David Graybeal
                      Arbor Woodworks
                      Portland, OR.

                      "Here's to love, the only fire against which there is no insurance"
                    • hal
                      ... Whoa there. What about the Linseed on the wood? What if I apply a lot, a little, Just the right amount of Linseed oil to wood? Is my boat going to burst
                      Message 10 of 13 , Feb 27, 2004
                        On Feb 27, 2004, at 3:37 PM, David wrote:

                        > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "antec007" <pateson@c...> wrote:
                        >> Linseed Oil is Great Stuff.
                        >>
                        >> But, Linseed Oil is Very Dangerous.
                        >> Pat Patteson
                        >
                        >>>>>>> ABSOLUTELY TRUE!!

                        Whoa there. What about the Linseed on the wood?
                        What if I apply a lot, a little, Just the right amount
                        of Linseed oil to wood? Is my boat going to burst into
                        flames? I read somewhere that you apply Linseed with
                        a garden sprayer and just let the excess run into the
                        bilge. Am I making an incendiary device a boat or what?

                        hal
                      • David
                        ... Hi Hal, The short answer is no. Maybe someone out there is familiar enough with the chemistry involved to explain why exactly. I m not. All I know is that
                        Message 11 of 13 , Feb 27, 2004
                          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, hal <hal@c...> wrote:
                          >
                          > On Feb 27, 2004, at 3:37 PM, David wrote:
                          >
                          > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "antec007" <pateson@c...> wrote:
                          > >> Linseed Oil is Great Stuff.
                          > >>
                          > >> But, Linseed Oil is Very Dangerous.
                          > >> Pat Patteson
                          > >
                          > >>>>>>> ABSOLUTELY TRUE!!
                          >
                          > Whoa there. What about the Linseed on the wood?
                          > What if I apply a lot, a little, Just the right amount
                          > of Linseed oil to wood? Is my boat going to burst into
                          > flames? I read somewhere that you apply Linseed with
                          > a garden sprayer and just let the excess run into the
                          > bilge. Am I making an incendiary device a boat or what?
                          >
                          > hal

                          Hi Hal,
                          The short answer is no. Maybe someone out there is familiar enough
                          with the chemistry involved to explain why exactly. I'm not. All I
                          know is that the linseed oil in and of itself will not spontaneously
                          combust. A tin full will not. A quantity of saturated flooring,
                          decking, etc. will not. It seems that there must be a certain quantity
                          of oil soaked into a vehicle. This vehicle must not keep oxygen away
                          totally, but must not let so much air in that the evaporation outpaces
                          the (what I presume is an) exothermic reaction. In other words, the
                          right conditions must exist. These conditions seem to be perfectly
                          provided by a wadded up oily rag.
                          Hope that makes it slightly less muddy, and assuages any fears you may
                          have. In your case, I'd say the key is ventilation. I imagine it
                          doesn't matter so much what quantity of oil you use. However, if
                          you're applying it correctly, you won't be creating great floods and
                          pools of the stuff. You flood the wood, give it a time to soak in,
                          then wipe off the excess. Repeat per the schedule mentioned
                          previously. But you don't want to create the same kind of
                          low-evaporation conditions embodied by a wadded up rag. Keep the
                          ventilation maximized.

                          Shalom,
                          David Graybeal
                          Portland, OR.

                          "Here's to love, the only fire against which there is no insurance"
                        • b_owen_ca
                          I m no expert either but I suspect it s like spontaneous combustion in hay (any farmers out there?) where you need the right moisture level for it to occur.
                          Message 12 of 13 , Feb 28, 2004
                            I'm no expert either but I suspect it's like spontaneous combustion
                            in hay (any farmers out there?) where you need the right moisture
                            level for it to occur.

                            BTW - I remember running across a little blurb in WoodenBoat about a
                            pro boatbuilder near Vancouver BC who treated his commercial "work"
                            boats that were often out of the water with RAW linseed oil before
                            using a traditional oil paint on them. What little I recall is that
                            he'd work a coat into the wood with a stiff bristled brush - not pour
                            it on - and repeated once a week - I can't remember how long. It's
                            apparently an old trick but leaves a mild linseed smell.

                            And in a somewhat related topic, there's the old blacksmith's trick.
                            Get a handful of raw walnuts, put it into a piece of canvas, tie it
                            up into a bundle and give it a few bashes with something to get the
                            raw walnut oil running. Use it on bare wooden handles BEFORE you use
                            them and after a while you'll have a handle that you can use without
                            blistering your hands and it won't be slippery. Works great on garden
                            tools, axes, etc. NB - raw nut oils go "off" pretty fast so replace
                            the whole bundle every month or so.

                            Bryant

                            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "David" <arbordg@y...> wrote:
                            > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, hal <hal@c...> wrote:> > Whoa
                            there. What about the Linseed on the wood?

                            > Hi Hal,
                            > The short answer is no. Maybe someone out there is familiar enough
                            > with the chemistry involved to explain why exactly.
                          • Al
                            ... Dead easy. In a tin, or sloshing around in the bottom of your boat, you have a large volume of material with relatively small surface area. The oxidation
                            Message 13 of 13 , Feb 28, 2004
                              > The short answer is no. Maybe someone out there is
                              > familiar enough
                              > with the chemistry involved to explain why exactly.

                              Dead easy. In a tin, or sloshing around in the bottom
                              of your boat, you have a large volume of material with
                              relatively small surface area. The oxidation reaction
                              happens at the surface of the material and nowhere
                              else. (In addition, the volume of material also acts
                              as a heat sink, helping to keep the temperature of the
                              oil below it's point of spontaneous combustion).

                              However, if you get a rag with linseed oil in it, you
                              have a very large surface area and therefore a lot of
                              oxidation happens very quickly. This is ok if you
                              have the rag spread out over a bar or something as the
                              rag will cool down almost as quickly as it heats up
                              due to the reaction. However, if you scrunch the rag
                              up, there's still plenty of oxygen in there, so the
                              reaction goes ahead, but the heat can't escape as
                              easily, so it starts to build up. That's when you
                              start to see smouldering rags.

                              I hope that makes some kind of sense.

                              Al





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