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Re: [Michalak] Mast varnishing

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  • Sakari Aaltonen
    ... My method: 1. Drive screws into pieces of plywood, then put the pieces on the floor, in a line, with the tips pointing up. Put two screws into each piece.
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 2, 2004
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      On Mon, 2 Feb 2004, fogovonslack wrote:

      > How do folks deal with varnishing a mast? I can't quite figure out how
      > to get a single, even coat on a round spar--there aren't corners to
      > conceal a break from varnishing one side and then the other. I've read
      > that one traditionally varnishes a mast by hanging it from a tall pair
      > of sawhorses, but it seems like the rope slings will mar the finish.
      >
      > Suggestions?

      My method:

      1. Drive screws into pieces of plywood, then put the pieces on the floor,
      in a line, with the tips pointing up. Put two screws into each piece.

      2. Varnish one side of the spar, also doing as much of the other side
      as possible.

      3. Put the spar on the screw tips with the done side pointing down and
      varnish the rest. Because there are two screws on each piece of
      plywood, the spar will be more or less balanced.

      There will be pin marks from the screws, but they will not be
      noticeable. The screw-plywood thingies from step 1 are, of course,
      reusable.


      Sakari Aaltonen
    • Dawn and Derek
      Several spars later, I m a Spar-B-Q believer. A pair of thrift-store roller-blades were sacrificed to the cause. Two wheels still attached to a bit of the
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 2, 2004
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        Several spars later, I'm a "Spar-B-Q" believer. A pair of thrift-store
        roller-blades were sacrificed to the cause. Two wheels still attached to a
        bit of the chassis make a roller cradle. Two such cradles clamped to
        sawhorses will happily support at least twenty feet of mast. Move them up or
        down the mast between coats and the edges feather in without problem. Simple
        wooden chucks will grip and turn a variety of differing spar end-shapes.

        If you haven't already bought the spar varnish, water based exterior
        polyurethanes ("Varathane") dry to the touch in minutes rather than hours,
        are tough as nails, durable in all weathers, and retouch easily. The whole
        spar can be multi-coat finished in one warm day.

        A parting thought; It may be worth remembering that once the mast is
        stepped, nobody gets a close look at the top half....

        cheers
        Derek
      • John Ewing
        Place two sawhorses the length of the mast/spar apart. Drive a couple screws or nails part-way, an inch or less apart, on the top of each but near the edge
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 2, 2004
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          Place two sawhorses the length of the mast/spar apart. Drive a couple screws or nails part-way, an inch or less apart, on the top of each but near the edge facing the other horse. Drive a long screw or nail into each end of the spar/mast, roughly on its axis. Suspend between the horses. The spar/mast will turn freely as you paint, while the pairs of nails in the horses will keep it from wandering off. After it's dry, remove pivot screws/nails and fill holes (especially the top one).

          John


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • fogovonslack
          ... ... hours, ... whole ... I haven t tried that--so far I ve used spar urethane (not water-based) which takes significantly longer than that to dry.
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 4, 2004
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            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Dawn and Derek" <dgw@d...> wrote:
            <SNIP>
            > If you haven't already bought the spar varnish, water based exterior
            > polyurethanes ("Varathane") dry to the touch in minutes rather than
            hours,
            > are tough as nails, durable in all weathers, and retouch easily. The
            whole
            > spar can be multi-coat finished in one warm day.

            I haven't tried that--so far I've used "spar urethane" (not
            water-based) which takes significantly longer than that to dry.

            Will water-based polyurethanes stick to oil-based when it comes time
            to re-coat?

            <SNIP>
            > A parting thought; It may be worth remembering that once the mast is
            > stepped, nobody gets a close look at the top half....

            Nobody gets a close look at the bottom two feet either, which are
            under the deck when stepped. ;-)

            I considered making a horizontal mast step to hold the mast sideways
            by the bottom part, which would then be painted once the visible
            portions of the mast were varnished:

            | |
            ================================== <---(mast)
            | |
            +---+-----------
          • Derek Waters
            ... to re-coat? The honest answer is I don t know . It will go on and stay on over stains, and over epoxy, but I ve never tried the oil-based stuff as a
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 4, 2004
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              >"Will water-based polyurethanes stick to oil-based when it comes time
              to re-coat?"

              The honest answer is " I don't know". It will go on and stay on over stains,
              and over epoxy, but I've never tried the oil-based stuff as a basecoat.
              Flecto have a help line you might call; 1-800-635-3286.

              cheers
              Derek
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