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Making your own sails?

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  • paxton_consulting
    What are people doing for sails? If you re making your own are you using polytarps, dacron, or some other sail material? If you re buying sails, what
    Message 1 of 33 , Mar 27, 2002
      What are people doing for sails? If you're making your own are you
      using polytarps, dacron, or some other sail material? If you're
      buying sails, what sailmakers have you used, and are you happy with
      their work?

      Bill Paxton
      Apple Valley, MN where the ice is just beginning to melt on the lakes.
    • lewisboats
      As usual, anyone not posting a response is assumed to be in complete and total agreement with me. I ll post and I ll even agree. We are in the same boat
      Message 33 of 33 , Mar 31, 2002
        "As usual, anyone not posting a response is assumed to
        be in complete and total agreement with me."

        I'll post and I'll even agree. We are in the same boat (pun), as I
        often wonder which corner of a square sail is the more important.
        (please, no flood of explanations). I build and use motorized boats,
        mostly for fishing. YES!, you can fish from a sailboat, but it just
        ain't as easy and my kids are impatient (but not as impatient as
        dad!). I would like to learn to sail, someday soon, but I have about
        6 (Motor or row) boat designs I would like to build between now and
        then (gimme a year or 2). I also agree with the assesment of wood
        quality. My boats are made from luaun or meranti ($6.50/sheet)
        underlayment, epoxy (if I'm feeling extravagant) or polyester and FG
        tape, with latex over all. I usually am testing out a design and the
        material is of secondary importance. I have 3 (me built) boats in the
        back yard now and not one is built the same way. I am currently in
        the middle of the first duplication of method (S&G) but on a totally
        different design than the others. My first V bottom. (handshakes,
        congrats, and cigars all around). I plan knocking out 3 or 4 this
        summer (hopefully!), proviso the wife lets me. (she thinks ONE boat
        is too many). To that end, I am currently engaged in the production
        of one "Fisher10", a v bottom skiff of my own modest design (I really
        must build one of someone else's design one of these days). A general
        idea of the boat is at http://angelfire.com/ego/lewisboatworks Look
        for the Being built link. Next will be Chugger, a MINIMAL overnight
        cabin cruiser. Cruise around the site and let me know what you think.

        Regards, Steve.






        --- In Michalak@y..., "vexatious2001" <cadbury@s...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > > Last time I saw a hundred dollar bill on the floor, I took the
        time
        > > to bend over and pick it up.
        >
        >
        >
        > I don't know if I would bend over for a hundred bucks, although
        > I would probably bend over for two hundred.
        >
        > Oh, wait a minute, I didn't see the part where you said
        > the money was laying on the floor....
        >
        > But, seriously folks, depending on lots of variables, it
        > can make sense to go either way.
        >
        > For me, it makes sense to go as cheap as possible, because the
        > whole boat has been built as cheaply as possible; BC pine
        > plywood, no epoxy (except for chines and leeboard/ rudder
        > laminations) and latex paint.
        >
        > Now, If I had O-kum-ee ply shipped in, was coating everything
        > with Gouge-em (editorial) brothers epoxy, and was painting
        > with a two-part, gen-u-wine marine polyurethane paint, I would
        > probably be inclined to use real live sailcloth on the sail.
        >
        > As this is my first sailboat (they say a boy never forgets
        > his first...), and I don't know yet whether I will care more
        > for it than motor-yachting, and if I do like sailing I don't
        > know if this is a boat I will want to keep long term, I
        > thought it prudent not to sink (pun) much money into it.
        > For example, the rudder is hung on garden-gate hinges
        > (Richard's idea, I believe).
        >
        > Since I have little experience sailing, I don't know
        > if I would even recognize the difference between a
        > "good" sail and a "poor" one for a while yet.
        >
        > If it turns out I don't like sailing or I don't like this
        > particular boat, the only way I can get rid of it is
        > to either cut it up and put it in a dumpster, or fill
        > it full of rocks and sink it in a deep hole somewhere,
        > 'cause there is zero resale value on home-made boats around
        > these parts.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > As Bolger and Michalak say, either go as cheap as possible,
        > or go first class- nothing inbetween makes sense.
        >
        >
        > As usual, anyone not posting a response is assumed to
        > be in complete and total agreement with me.
        >
        >
        >
        > Max
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