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Re: Lead casting

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  • fogovonslack
    Thanks for all the helpful suggestions. I ve poured the sink weights into my centerboard and rudder. They need a little smoothing and shaping where I
    Message 1 of 14 , Nov 1, 2003
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      Thanks for all the helpful suggestions.

      I've poured the sink weights into my centerboard and rudder. They need
      a little smoothing and shaping where I over-filled and where the stell
      plate I used warped from the heat, but I've managed to avoid injuring
      myself in the process, so I'll call it a successful venture.

      I even managed to take a few photos, which I'll post later.

      Tidmarsh Major
      Tuscaloosa, Ala.

      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "fogovonslack" <fogovonslack@y...> wrote:
      > Looks like its time to cast some lead for my centerboard and rudder
      > weights. I got a bucket full of used wheel weights from the tire store
      > yesterday. Some of 'em are pretty dirty & muddy ("turn off the paved
      > road" is a pretty common direction around here).
      >
      > Should I wash them before casting to keep out the impurities, or is
      > that not really necessary?
      >
      > Tidmarsh
      > Tuscaloosa, Ala.
    • fogovonslack
      For a few photos, have a look here: http://home.bellsouth.net/p/s/community.dll?ep=331&groupid=147689&folderid=109828&folderview=thumbs&ck= For photos and
      Message 2 of 14 , Nov 1, 2003
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        For a few photos, have a look here:
        http://home.bellsouth.net/p/s/community.dll?ep=331&groupid=147689&folderid=109828&folderview=thumbs&ck=

        For photos and commentary, keep an eye on the Duckworks magazine site.

        Tidmarsh
        Tuscaloosa, Ala.

        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "fogovonslack" <fogovonslack@y...> wrote:
        > Thanks for all the helpful suggestions.
        >
        > I've poured the sink weights into my centerboard and rudder. They need
        > a little smoothing and shaping where I over-filled and where the stell
        > plate I used warped from the heat, but I've managed to avoid injuring
        > myself in the process, so I'll call it a successful venture.
        >
        > I even managed to take a few photos, which I'll post later.
        >
        > Tidmarsh Major
        > Tuscaloosa, Ala.
        >
      • lon wells
        Speaking as someone that worked in a lead smelter and had lead poisoning (while using every known safety device). I do not know if it is wise to encourage
        Message 3 of 14 , Nov 1, 2003
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          Speaking as someone that worked in a lead smelter and
          had lead poisoning (while using every known safety
          device). I do not know if it is wise to encourage
          home builders to cast molten lead. The risk of fire,
          explosions and lead poisoning is too great.

          It would be possible to cast the lead shot or wheel
          weights into a fiberglass resin and obtain near the
          same results.

          A small note about respirators. Once the cartridges
          are exposed to air they start to lose effectiveness.
          We use to change our cartridges daily. If you are not
          changing your cartridges daily. Place your respirator
          in a zip lock bag, squeeze out the air and it will
          extend the cartridge life.

          When you buy your respirator a safety supply store can
          fit the respirators to your face size and test the
          fit. Just because you are a large person does not mean
          that you take a large respirator maybe you have small
          facial features. It is best to have the respirator
          fit, better places do it for free.
          Lon



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        • sctree
          Glad to see you took the time to start with everything neat and dry, and that fan was a great idea... How did you transfer the lead from pot to mold? That s
          Message 4 of 14 , Nov 1, 2003
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            Glad to see you took the time to start with everything neat and dry, and
            that fan was a great idea...

            How did you transfer the lead from pot to mold? That's what I found
            tricky, 700 degrees is big time hot.

            Maybe you couldn't, but thinking ahead for others who might give this a
            go, how about flipping those clamps so they were less in the way??

            Rick


            fogovonslack wrote:

            > For a few photos, have a look here:
            > http://home.bellsouth.net/p/s/community.dll?ep=331&groupid=147689&folderid=109828&folderview=thumbs&ck=
            > <http://home.bellsouth.net/p/s/community.dll?ep=331&groupid=147689&folderid=109828&folderview=thumbs&ck=>
            >
            > For photos and commentary, keep an eye on the Duckworks magazine site.
            >
            > Tidmarsh
            > Tuscaloosa, Ala.
            >
            > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "fogovonslack" <fogovonslack@y...> wrote:
            > > Thanks for all the helpful suggestions.
            > >
            > > I've poured the sink weights into my centerboard and rudder. They need
            > > a little smoothing and shaping where I over-filled and where the stell
            > > plate I used warped from the heat, but I've managed to avoid injuring
            > > myself in the process, so I'll call it a successful venture.
            > >
            > > I even managed to take a few photos, which I'll post later.
            > >
            > > Tidmarsh Major
            > > Tuscaloosa, Ala.
            > >
            >
            >
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          • fogovonslack
            ... I just poured directly into the molds. I drilled a 3/8 hole in the side of the pot to pour from. ... Not a bad idea. Both pieces had one side without
            Message 5 of 14 , Nov 3, 2003
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              --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, sctree <sctree@d...> wrote:
              > How did you transfer the lead from pot to mold? That's what I found
              > tricky,

              I just poured directly into the molds. I drilled a 3/8" hole in the
              side of the pot to pour from.

              > Maybe you couldn't, but thinking ahead for others who might give this a
              > go, how about flipping those clamps so they were less in the way??
              >

              Not a bad idea. Both pieces had one side without clams in the way, so
              the clamps didn't hinder me much, but it couldn't hurt to flip 'em the
              other way.

              Tidmarsh
            • fogovonslack
              ... I appreciate your concerns. How much lead exposure does one face casting outside? How much is sufficient to cause lead poisoning? Casting centerboard
              Message 6 of 14 , Nov 3, 2003
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                --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, lon wells <lononriver@y...> wrote:
                > Speaking as someone that worked in a lead smelter and
                > had lead poisoning (while using every known safety
                > device). I do not know if it is wise to encourage
                > home builders to cast molten lead. The risk of fire,
                > explosions and lead poisoning is too great.
                >
                I appreciate your concerns. How much lead exposure does one face
                casting outside? How much is sufficient to cause lead poisoning?
                Casting centerboard weights isn't something I plan to hake a habit of.

                > It would be possible to cast the lead shot or wheel
                > weights into a fiberglass resin and obtain near the
                > same results.

                I'm not sure how well wheel weights would work in this situation,
                given their large, uneven size, which would leave a lot of empty space
                to fill with epoxy or other resin. I think lead shot would work
                perfectly well, though, as I suspect I have more lead than I need cast
                in place, judging by the weight of the centerboard & rudder.

                If I have occasion to weight another centerboard, I'll probably use
                that method rather than casting.

                Thanks for the helpful advice on respirators.

                Tidmarsh
              • doc
                FWIW,,,, I have added weight to several rudders and always preferred the shot or scrap lead method.. It is so much safer and easier... Just cut out the
                Message 7 of 14 , Nov 3, 2003
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                  FWIW,,,,

                  I have added weight to several rudders and always preferred the shot or scrap lead method.. It is so much safer and easier...
                  Just cut out the desired amount of material, cover one side with aluminum foil or waxed paper and fill with lead shot or scraps of tire weights or what have you,,, then pour the cavity full of polyester or epoxy resin..

                  be well,

                  doc


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                • Lincoln Ross
                  Long ago I did some lead casting to seal an old fashioned plumbing setup. (You caulk the flange/pipe joint with Oakum and then pour it in.) Later made weights
                  Message 8 of 14 , Nov 3, 2003
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                    Long ago I did some lead casting to seal an old fashioned plumbing
                    setup. (You caulk the flange/pipe joint with Oakum and then pour it in.)
                    Later made weights for scuba diving. Anyway, it used to be that plumbing
                    supply places carried nice lead pots, ladles, etc. One nice feature is
                    they don't look like food pots. We had one idiot in the house who melted
                    lead in a fry pan and then didn't want to toss the pan, claiming it was
                    well seasoned and wouldn't pick up any lead! I smashed it. We had an
                    industrial stove and a really strong hood fan so it was no big deal to
                    do it in the kitchen. But there was a certain anxiety walking down the
                    hall to the bathroom with a few pounds of molten lead, hoping no one
                    came rushing down the stairs. We had another idiot who used the giant
                    metal salad bowl to dip boards in wood preservative (of a type since
                    removed from the market for excessive toxicity). But that's another
                    story which may explain why I'm not smarter.
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