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Air pockets in fiberglass seams

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  • donaldm2003
    For connecting the plywood I decided to use just fiberglass tape and epoxy.  The seams came out pretty good but as I started working on dry fitting the
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 30, 2013
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      For connecting the plywood I decided to use just fiberglass tape and epoxy.  The seams came out pretty good but as I started working on dry fitting the sides to the forms one of the joints cracked and the other now has air pockets. What I would like to do is use plywood butt plates instead.    Would this be possible?  Should I cut the parts that have air in them away first or is there a way to remove all of the fiberglass tape?  Can I just but the plywood right over where the air pockets are? Any assistance is appreciated. Thanks in advance. Don
    • Martin Houston
      I had several voids/air pockets when glassing the Jani J. what I did was drill a 1/8 hole at the bottom of the void and another at the top. Made some tapered
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 31, 2013
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        I had several voids/air pockets when glassing the Jani J. what I did was drill a 1/8 hole at the bottom of the void and another at the top. Made some tapered wood plugs. You can get plastic serynges for injecting epoxy resin. Squeeze bottles also work. Inject resin into the bottom, when it comes out the top, drive in the plugs.

        Small air pockets are unavoidable & largely ignored. In the boatyard they used to say "Adds extra boyancy."

        Martin


        ________________________________
        From: "don1@..." <don1@...>
        To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, August 30, 2013 6:17 PM
        Subject: [Michalak] Air pockets in fiberglass seams



         
        For connecting the plywood I decided to use just fiberglass tape and epoxy.  The seams came out pretty good but as I started working on dry fitting the sides to the forms one of the joints cracked and the other now has air pockets. What I would like to do is use plywood butt plates instead.    Would this be possible?  Should I cut the parts that have air in them away first or is there a way to remove all of the fiberglass tape?  Can I just but the plywood right over where the air pockets are? Any assistance is appreciated. Thanks in advance. Don


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bob Cook
        .....or you could think of air bubbles as cheap floatation...   and when you re working on lead, I m sure all of you use the proper dust masks..... inhaled
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 1, 2013
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          .....or you could think of air bubbles as cheap floatation...   and when you're working on lead, I'm sure all of you use the proper dust masks..... inhaled lead dust never leaves the body.  There's a reason why they quit putting lead in pencils

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Chris Crandall
          Lead kinetics came up, and I just wanted to add a point or two: 1. The first rule of lead is do NOT let it get into your body; very sane advice. Also, don t
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 3, 2013
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            Lead kinetics came up, and I just wanted to add a point or two:

            1. The first rule of lead is do NOT let it get into your body; very sane
            advice. Also, don't let hot lead get near you, and that means anything
            that hot lead touches should be drier than the Mojave Desert. Any
            moisture will cause splatter-->burn-->unhappy boatbuilder (or perhaps a
            dead one).

            2. Lead was removed from pencils just slightly before pencils were
            invented. They've always used graphite. From Wikipedia "When the pencil
            originated as a wrapped graphite writing tool, the particular type of
            graphite being used was named plumbago (lit. act for lead, or lead mockup)."

            3. On lead metabolism, one might check here:
            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC333178/ It's really quite
            fascinating. In the blood, " lead has a mean life of 35 days," and "lead
            in soft tissue has a mean life of approximately 40 days" and lead in
            soft tissue "gives rise to lead in hair, nails, sweat, and salivary,
            gastric, pancreatic, and biliary secretions."

            The really bad news is this, lead in bones " . . . skeleton, contains
            the vast quantity of body lead, and has a very slow mean life." This
            means that much of the lead gets out pretty slowly, the graphs suggest
            more than a year. Don't inhale it, don't eat it, shower immediately
            after sanding it, a rinse off with the garden hose is by no means excessive.

            <ToH to Bob C.>


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • souderscott997
            I realize I am weighing in on this sort of late but...I wouldn t leave out the fillet. It structurally is important and it solves part of the problem of air
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 9, 2013
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              I realize I am weighing in on this sort of late but...I wouldn't leave out the fillet. It structurally is important and it solves part of the problem of air under the fiberglass tape. It gives the tape an easier contour to follow with no (or certainly less) of a void underneath which equals less air under it. Plus by adding the cabosil or even wood flour you actually extend the volume of your epoxy using less in the end. 



              ---In michalak@yahoogroups.com, <crandall@...> wrote:

              Lead kinetics came up, and I just wanted to add a point or two:

              1. The first rule of lead is do NOT let it get into your body; very sane
              advice. Also, don't let hot lead get near you, and that means anything
              that hot lead touches should be drier than the Mojave Desert. Any
              moisture will cause splatter-->burn-->unhappy boatbuilder (or perhaps a
              dead one).

              2. Lead was removed from pencils just slightly before pencils were
              invented. They've always used graphite. From Wikipedia "When the pencil
              originated as a wrapped graphite writing tool, the particular type of
              graphite being used was named plumbago (lit. act for lead, or lead mockup)."

              3. On lead metabolism, one might check here:
              http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC333178/ It's really quite
              fascinating. In the blood, " lead has a mean life of 35 days," and "lead
              in soft tissue has a mean life of approximately 40 days" and lead in
              soft tissue "gives rise to lead in hair, nails, sweat, and salivary,
              gastric, pancreatic, and biliary secretions."

              The really bad news is this, lead in bones " . . . skeleton, contains
              the vast quantity of body lead, and has a very slow mean life." This
              means that much of the lead gets out pretty slowly, the graphs suggest
              more than a year. Don't inhale it, don't eat it, shower immediately
              after sanding it, a rinse off with the garden hose is by no means excessive.

              <ToH to Bob C.>


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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