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Re: [Michalak] Re: Jewelbox ... One More Time.

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  • john colley
    Rob,I totally agree with you about small boats being used more.The smaller it is,the easier it i to launch and retrieve,It will get used much more than one
    Message 1 of 24 , Aug 17, 2013
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      Rob,I totally agree with you about small boats being used more.The smaller it is,the easier it i to launch and retrieve,It will get used much more than one twice its size.How many keelers are rotting at their moorings ?Too big,can't be readily moved,or accessed.


       
      "There is magic in the feel of a paddle and the movement of a canoe, a magic compounded of distance, adventure, solitude, and peace."
      -Sigurd Olson


      ________________________________
      From: Rob Kellock <creditscorenz@...>
      To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, 17 August 2013 9:39 AM
      Subject: [Michalak] Re: Jewelbox ... One More Time.



       
      Hi Dennis,

      I assume you are going to be sailing solo? If that's the case you want to go as small as you can get away with. Small has lots of advantages as Nels has already pointed out, not least of which is the possibility of inside storage if the boat is less than 15ft long (the mast, trailer tongue and rudder means the overall length of a 15ft boat is more like 18.5ft - 19.0ft which is the maximum length of most car shed's).

      The only drawback for short boats is their hull speed, but over time I've worked out that whenever that problem occurs, I end up using the OB anyway, so it's not an issue either.

      One things for sure, the shorter your boat, the more often you will use it. Pity the Paradox won't work for you. I'm starting to think a Paradox might be what I need for my next boat.

      Cheers,

      Rob.

      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Dennis Mingear <dennismingear@...> wrote:
      >
      > The Caroline is a possibilty, and someone has built and sailed one here. I can't remember the boats name or builder, but I remember it being a nice build. Maybe I need to look at Caroline a little more closely.
      >
      > Thanks Marka,
      >
      > Dennis
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • JeffreyM
      I ll second the experience in tacking in chop. No matter how hard I try to time the tack to put the bow in a trough at the critical moment, I still have
      Message 2 of 24 , Aug 17, 2013
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        I'll second the experience in tacking in chop. No matter how hard I try to time the tack to put the bow in a trough at the critical moment, I still have trouble getting through stays. Many's the time I end up wearing instead--and often get knocked down if turning too suddenly at the jibe. I knew about Sage's bow, but tried a different approach: adding a bolt-on pointy bow that pretty much continues the curves of sides and bottom to their conclusion. The thing was a flop: caught so much wind in the wrong place at the wrongest time when tacking. I finally decided that the big flat bottom below the transom was the main problem, rather than the bow transom itself. Now all that hard work is gathering dust in the garage. Back to wearing round when I can't complete tacks...


        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Mark Albanese <marka97203@...> wrote:
        >
        > Jim's warped vee entry is worth considering. Tho admittedly a babe in the
        > woods type sailor, I still don't wholly buy the "heeled sharpie presents a
        > vee to the waves" argument.
        >
        > Most of the time in any sailing wind Sage is happy at 15 - 20 degrees,
        > still more or less upright. On a reach 30 draws comments from the dockbox
        > committee about how amazingly fast she is, but beyond that, besides
        > tumbling into the bilge, the water starts looking pretty close to the
        > windows. I'm fine with all that but would like to keep some reserve
        > buoyancy in reserve.
        >
        > My problem with the theory comes in tacking. I'm in these long, narrow
        > lakes with the wind coming right down one end to the other. Coming about,
        > the boat wants to come level first, before heading off on the other tack,
        > thus presenting the flattest part of the bottom to the line of waves and, a
        > lot of the time, stopping her in irons.
        >
        > That's the moment when the Tweenlike, Petesboat bow will be most handy.
        >
        > markA
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • TomH
        What design is that please? I don t recognize the name Sage
        Message 3 of 24 , Aug 17, 2013
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          What design is that please? I don't recognize the name "Sage"

          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "JeffreyM" <JMichalsbr@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'll second the experience in tacking in chop. No matter how hard I try to time the tack to put the bow in a trough at the critical moment, I still have trouble getting through stays. Many's the time I end up wearing instead--and often get knocked down if turning too suddenly at the jibe. I knew about Sage's bow, but tried a different approach: adding a bolt-on pointy bow that pretty much continues the curves of sides and bottom to their conclusion. The thing was a flop: caught so much wind in the wrong place at the wrongest time when tacking. I finally decided that the big flat bottom below the transom was the main problem, rather than the bow transom itself. Now all that hard work is gathering dust in the garage. Back to wearing round when I can't complete tacks...
          >
          >
          > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Mark Albanese <marka97203@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Jim's warped vee entry is worth considering. Tho admittedly a babe in the
          > > woods type sailor, I still don't wholly buy the "heeled sharpie presents a
          > > vee to the waves" argument.
          > >
          > > Most of the time in any sailing wind Sage is happy at 15 - 20 degrees,
          > > still more or less upright. On a reach 30 draws comments from the dockbox
          > > committee about how amazingly fast she is, but beyond that, besides
          > > tumbling into the bilge, the water starts looking pretty close to the
          > > windows. I'm fine with all that but would like to keep some reserve
          > > buoyancy in reserve.
          > >
          > > My problem with the theory comes in tacking. I'm in these long, narrow
          > > lakes with the wind coming right down one end to the other. Coming about,
          > > the boat wants to come level first, before heading off on the other tack,
          > > thus presenting the flattest part of the bottom to the line of waves and, a
          > > lot of the time, stopping her in irons.
          > >
          > > That's the moment when the Tweenlike, Petesboat bow will be most handy.
          > >
          > > markA
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
        • Mark Albanese
          Jeffrey, Wearing ship is a time honoured solution. I m always excited at how much faster she suddenly goes. I ve been thinking about a bolt on, but with the
          Message 4 of 24 , Aug 17, 2013
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            Jeffrey,

            Wearing ship is a time honoured solution. I'm always excited at how much
            faster she suddenly goes.

            I've been thinking about a bolt on, but with the vee down low. With the
            present chine line, can't get 15 degrees like Twister, but maybe 10 or 12.
            Are there any pictures of what you did?
            markA
            On Aug 17, 2013 2:50 PM, "JeffreyM" <JMichalsbr@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > I'll second the experience in tacking in chop. No matter how hard I try to
            > time the tack to put the bow in a trough at the critical moment, I still
            > have trouble getting through stays. Many's the time I end up wearing
            > instead--and often get knocked down if turning too suddenly at the jibe. I
            > knew about Sage's bow, but tried a different approach: adding a bolt-on
            > pointy bow that pretty much continues the curves of sides and bottom to
            > their conclusion. The thing was a flop: caught so much wind in the wrong
            > place at the wrongest time when tacking. I finally decided that the big
            > flat bottom below the transom was the main problem, rather than the bow
            > transom itself. Now all that hard work is gathering dust in the garage.
            > Back to wearing round when I can't complete tacks...
            >
            > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Mark Albanese <marka97203@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Jim's warped vee entry is worth considering. Tho admittedly a babe in the
            > > woods type sailor, I still don't wholly buy the "heeled sharpie presents
            > a
            > > vee to the waves" argument.
            > >
            > > Most of the time in any sailing wind Sage is happy at 15 - 20 degrees,
            > > still more or less upright. On a reach 30 draws comments from the dockbox
            > > committee about how amazingly fast she is, but beyond that, besides
            > > tumbling into the bilge, the water starts looking pretty close to the
            > > windows. I'm fine with all that but would like to keep some reserve
            > > buoyancy in reserve.
            > >
            > > My problem with the theory comes in tacking. I'm in these long, narrow
            > > lakes with the wind coming right down one end to the other. Coming about,
            > > the boat wants to come level first, before heading off on the other tack,
            > > thus presenting the flattest part of the bottom to the line of waves
            > and, a
            > > lot of the time, stopping her in irons.
            > >
            > > That's the moment when the Tweenlike, Petesboat bow will be most handy.
            > >
            > > markA
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Mark Albanese
            Sorry. Jewelbox Jr. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 24 , Aug 17, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Sorry. Jewelbox Jr.
              On Aug 17, 2013 5:01 PM, "TomH" <harp.151@...> wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              >
              > What design is that please? I don't recognize the name "Sage"
              >
              > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "JeffreyM" <JMichalsbr@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > I'll second the experience in tacking in chop. No matter how hard I try
              > to time the tack to put the bow in a trough at the critical moment, I still
              > have trouble getting through stays. Many's the time I end up wearing
              > instead--and often get knocked down if turning too suddenly at the jibe. I
              > knew about Sage's bow, but tried a different approach: adding a bolt-on
              > pointy bow that pretty much continues the curves of sides and bottom to
              > their conclusion. The thing was a flop: caught so much wind in the wrong
              > place at the wrongest time when tacking. I finally decided that the big
              > flat bottom below the transom was the main problem, rather than the bow
              > transom itself. Now all that hard work is gathering dust in the garage.
              > Back to wearing round when I can't complete tacks...
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Mark Albanese <marka97203@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Jim's warped vee entry is worth considering. Tho admittedly a babe in
              > the
              > > > woods type sailor, I still don't wholly buy the "heeled sharpie
              > presents a
              > > > vee to the waves" argument.
              > > >
              > > > Most of the time in any sailing wind Sage is happy at 15 - 20 degrees,
              > > > still more or less upright. On a reach 30 draws comments from the
              > dockbox
              > > > committee about how amazingly fast she is, but beyond that, besides
              > > > tumbling into the bilge, the water starts looking pretty close to the
              > > > windows. I'm fine with all that but would like to keep some reserve
              > > > buoyancy in reserve.
              > > >
              > > > My problem with the theory comes in tacking. I'm in these long, narrow
              > > > lakes with the wind coming right down one end to the other. Coming
              > about,
              > > > the boat wants to come level first, before heading off on the other
              > tack,
              > > > thus presenting the flattest part of the bottom to the line of waves
              > and, a
              > > > lot of the time, stopping her in irons.
              > > >
              > > > That's the moment when the Tweenlike, Petesboat bow will be most handy.
              > > >
              > > > markA
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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