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Re: [Michalak] Re: Plywood thickness... What does it effect?

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  • jhargrovewright2@juno.com
    Nels, You find the nut quickly. The bottom was 3 sandwiched foam with 5.2 plywood. No seats. No center frame, just an open boat with compartments at each
    Message 1 of 46 , Aug 3, 2013
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      Nels, You find the nut quickly. The bottom was 3" sandwiched foam with 5.2 plywood. No seats. No center frame, just an open boat with compartments at each end.. I have learned what adds weight and I keep those things to a minimum. If I build another it will be even lighter. The bottom and chine had 6oz glass/epoxy and some glass at specific stress points to make up for the eliminated bridge/frame. The boat is nominal 23', I think I remember.I am an old and skinny and weak guy now and I could pick up either end of the boat easily and even roll it over by my self in the driveway. Loading on a trailer was simple. The heavy boat I can not pick up either end and have to use my Bobcat to get it up on blocks high enough to drive the trailer under it. Even turning it over is a lever and blocking operation. Believe me the heavy bottom flexes in a seaway even with the seats bracing it. Sandra asked me what I thought about it doing that. No problem because it is well built and if it flexes, no problem. I do not remember the figures but with the bottom built as it was the boat easily had 1,000 lb of floatation. Self righting was an issue for me....so the masts and spars were hollow and a little larger dia. and fiberglassed cooper construction. The boat would not turtle because of that floatation high up. O'yeah, the bottom was self bailing. I sailed it with the plugs open on both sides. When I camped the plugs went in because walking around would get the bottom wet. I loved that boat more than any other for a long list of reasons. JIB (the devil is in the details)
      ---------- Original Message ----------
      From: "prairiedog2332" <nelsarv@...>
      To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Michalak] Re: Plywood thickness... What does it effect
      Date: Sat, 03 Aug 2013 21:54:38 -0000



      JIB,

      This is a great review of the options we have with a Michalak design! I
      find it rather curious that in a 25' hull that calls for a 1/2" bottom,
      and empty weight of 400 lb. you decided to go with 1/4" (or did you?)
      and it weighed only 130 lb? And then Chuck went to 3/4" bottom and added
      a Kevlar armor plating and it only came to only 260 lb? Or did you get
      the 130 lb weight with 1/2" bottom?

      I have to wonder how much bottom flexing occurred in yours? Not that I
      doubt your figures but important to us who may want to go to lighter
      scantlings to save weight. This could be loaded by by my son and I for
      example on my pick-up his wagon for example. A longer hull is easy to
      load with two people.

      If I could get down to that weight I would order Laguna plans post haste
      and include a water ballast tank amidships and a couple inflated tire
      tubes secured at each end.

      Nels

      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "jhargrovewright2@..." wrote:
      >
      > I have had the pleasure of sailing, hundreds of miles in a "Laguna"
      http://www.duckworksbbs.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=JM%2DLaguna
      that was built rather light at a bare hull weight of 130 lbs. and
      another built at about twice that at about 260# by Chuck L. A picture of
      the light version is at the bottom of the link above. Of course by the
      time you load up the boat with sails, spars, foils and a weeks supply of
      stuff for and a two crew, the weights tend to equalize. The heavy boat
      has a very heavy bottom made of 3/4" ply and a thick coat of
      epoxy/Kevlar like material. Needless to say the light boat was faster
      and the heavier boat is more stable in normal sailing conditions.
      Knowing the light boat was....lighter than the design weight and
      respecting Jim, as a boat designer I provided a water ballast tank (in)
      the bottom amidships that could carriy 250 lbs of water. I noticed no
      difference in a seaway because the Laguna is full in the bow and stern
      and any weight difference in the hull would be masked by the load of
      gear in the bow and stern compartments. The boat in the picture and my
      10 other boats burned in the...
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bastrop_County_Complex_fire so I referred
      to it in the past tense. By the way the light version with just me and a
      weeks gear would plane on a beam reach in shallow water at 14-16 mph for
      miles. JIB
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    • Scott Souder
      Well I appreciate all the feed back on the topic. Jim gave his blessing for the thicker bottom and the responses seem that the positive far outweigh the
      Message 46 of 46 , Aug 6, 2013
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        Well I appreciate all the feed back on the topic. Jim gave his blessing for the thicker bottom and the responses seem that the positive far outweigh the negatives. I think I've made up my mind.
        Thanks to all,
        Scott

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