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Re: Mayfly 16

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  • prairiedog2332
    Steven, No need to apologize regarding Deansbox as a suggestion as you were asking for feedback. This hull design was first suggested by Bolger when he
    Message 1 of 40 , Jul 31, 2013
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      Steven,
      No need to apologize regarding Deansbox as a suggestion as you were
      asking for feedback.
      This hull design was first suggested by Bolger when he postulated his
      "seas of peas theory" and Jim and he agreed it seemed to work and Jim
      wrote about it as well. A hard-chined sharpie turns out to be faster
      when the bottom rocker matches the curvature of the hull when viewed
      from above. This is due to a smoother flow of water along the chine
      intersection without as much eddying affect that would slow it. Visible
      as large swirls off to the side and stern. This hull shape shows
      remarkedly little wake when sailed heeled.

      But if you build a hull with that bottom rocker the ends stick up too
      far above the water and Bolger's solution was simply chop of the ends
      and the result is a scow shape. A nice side affect with this design is
      that the waterline lengthens as the downwind chine is immersed so when
      the boat is sailed heeled it is even faster than when upright. Yet in
      light winds when it is upright the wetted surface is less so it sails,
      motors or rows with less effort in light conditions.


      But a lot of folks don't like the looks of this hull design which lead
      Bolger to state (and I paraphrase) "What a lot of people don't
      understand is that the looks they don't like is responsible for the
      performance they do like."


      Most of Jim's hard-chine prams/ scows follow this shape. Piccup Squared,
      Jukebox and Jewelbox being examples.


      http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jim/jukebox3/index.htm
      <http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jim/jukebox3/index.htm>


      Prams and scows of course offer more carrying capacity per given length
      than a pointy bow and were very often build as working boats in the old
      days for that reason.

      Nels


      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Steven" wrote:
      >
      > Hi Nels,
      >
      > Thank you for the suggestions. I also heard back from Jim in a email
      outside of the forum. He also recommended the Caprice and he mentioned
      having sailed in several Mayfly 16 and said it's a great boat.
      >
      > So I guess those are my two future boats. Until I change my mind
      again, which in all likelyhood will happen several more times.
      >
      > Regarding Deansbox, I just can't get past the box part. Sorry, maybe
      I'm not as open minded as I thought.
      >
      > Steven
      >




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • ptfrohne
      I took a different route,  and built up the rudder with stepped 1/8in plywood.   Then faired it with drywall compound before glassing.  On my wife s 18ft
      Message 40 of 40 , Mar 31
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        I took a different route,  and built up the rudder with stepped 1/8in plywood.   Then faired it with drywall compound before glassing.  On my wife's 18ft Buccaneer, I used paper mache.  

        What if it gets a hole in it?  Nothing.  I put a hole in both just to see what happens.  The rudders aren't in the water long enough on any given outing to do much more damage other then the usual wear and tear.  And I'm a reliability engineer. 

        Phil
        Uncle Johns skiff


        Sent on the new Sprint Network from my Samsung Galaxy S®4.
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