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My Mayfly12 has gone 3D! (For the time being)

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  • mayfly726
    A couple pics are saved to a folder in the photos tab. It s 3-D, but has to be dismantled for gluing, and actually the bulkheads and transom need to be glued
    Message 1 of 49 , Jul 26, 2013
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      A couple pics are saved to a folder in the photos tab. It's 3-D, but has to be dismantled for gluing, and actually the bulkheads and transom need to be glued themselves, I got impatient waiting for my orders of Titebond III and Epoxy to come and slapped it together.

      Anyway, I'd be interested in talking to some of the other builders of Mayfly12s, they don't seem to be the most common of Jim's designs to get built, so there's less info out there on them and the building process and sailing and rowing performance than a lot of his other designs.
    • mayfly726
      Just posted some pics to the photos folder. On Sunday, Nimby had her debut as a surf-launching beach-cruising rowboat. And Stand-Up Paddleboard (SUP). The SUP
      Message 49 of 49 , Jul 24, 2014
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        Just posted some pics to the photos folder. On Sunday, Nimby had her debut as a surf-launching beach-cruising rowboat. And Stand-Up Paddleboard (SUP). The SUP thing is really popular out here. A friend celebrated her birthday at New Brighton Beach and rented a couple SUPs. I brought Nimby. It was a fair walk down to the beach, but I have a Davis Wheel-a-Weigh Dolly, which essentially converts the boat into a very stable and easily transportable wheelbarrow - all the beach stuff just gets chucked into the cockpit and wheeled around wherever we need to go. Super convenient, and way better than the products of my own dolly-making attempts.

        New Brighton is nice because it is one of the most sheltered beaches on the Monterey Bay, and the surf always looks really light. I was able to launch through the surf (a feat I've never accomplished with the Puddle Duck Racer).

        She rowed fairly well, but I was fighting the wind and the chop. The conditions seemed a bit rough for actual Stand-Up paddle boarding, but some people were able to do it. I figured that the SUPs weren't any wider or more stable than Nimby so I gave stand up paddling a try. It was doable I guess but not very efficient. She performs much better as a rowboat.

        It was very lovely to row away from the beach and get out into the ocean a little ways. Very peaceful. I rowed over some kelp beds, and the drag was startlingly significant, and accompanied by a loud hissing sound that I wasn't really expecting.

        I watched a windsurfer take off from shore and cover ground really fast. He sailed over my way. It was pretty interesting to compare his craft to mine. We both use windsurf masts and similarly sized sails. The bottom of both of our vessels are fairly similar in size, though in shape his probably has some vee to it or a round bilge. Nimby is considerably heavier and with more windage, but then I'm sitting down and he is standing up and he is wearing a wetsuit because he can pretty much count on going down at some point. But I can conclude that this beach is probably a reasonable place to try and sail the Mayfly12.

        After rowing around more or less aimlessly I turned and rowed all the way down the cliffs to the surf lineup at Capitola Beach, where the longboarders were sitting. It was nice to see the beach over there from the water, but I had already been out a long time and immediately turned around and headed back to New Brighton.

        During my time out the tide had risen and the swells had increased, and the surf breaking on the now more crowded beach was considerable. I landed by rowing Caribbean style facing the beach and the stern, sort of backing the boat in to keep the pointy side to the waves. It was a close thing actually, as the waves breaking on the shore were actually much steeper and heavier than I realized. I wound up having to jump overboard in chest deep water to grab the stem and duck through a large breaking wave, kind of the way you would do it with a surfboard if you were trying to paddle out. When I got the boat in there was a lot of water and sand in there. But it worked! And it was a lot of fun.

        One of my main reasons for building this boat was to have a vessel I could use in the closest body of water, a role which the Puddle Duck Racer is not really capable of filling, unfortunately. That said, it's not the ideal boat for surf launching, but I think it can be accomplished safely with good timing and a better understanding of the local tides and swell.
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