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Re: [Michalak] Re: Oseberg Viking Ship

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  • John Kohnen
    The yard never has to go under the forestay. It pivots at its center. On the starboard (a good Norse-based word ) tack the starboard end of the yard is
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 18, 2013
      The yard never has to go under the forestay. It pivots at its center. On
      the starboard (a good Norse-based word <g>) tack the starboard end of the
      yard is forward, and the starboard edge of the sail acts as the luff. When
      tacking, the starboard end of the yard is pulled aft until the port end is
      forward and the port edge of the sail becomes the luff on the larboard
      tack. No different from a "modern" square-rigger, except that the Viking
      ship has less standing rigging to get in the way, so it can brace up the
      yard closer to fore-and-aft. And of course those luff control lines the
      Norse used...

      I didn't really mean "rectangle" for describing a square sail. Obviously
      most are trapezoidal, but I couldn't think of the word for a laterally
      symmetrical trapezoid. I had to look it up -- "isoceles trapezoid". <g>

      On Thu, 18 Apr 2013 16:33:31 -0700, Nels wrote:

      > ...
      > In the photo sequence it shows they are sailing on starboard tack and
      > then seeming to come about. One photo shows the yard on the port side
      > and crew hauling on a luff line attached at two points on the sail. Sort
      > of like a sheetlet configuration on a Junk sail. The forestay is clearly
      > in the way of them hauling the yard further to starboard. Yet in the
      > next photo the yard is now on the starboard side and off they go on a
      > port tack. So how did they get the yard under the forestay? I think
      > they must have hauled down on line to get it under. I thought the only
      > way to do that was to dip the yard under the forestay?
      > ...

      --
      John (jkohnen@...)
      They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
      safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. (Benjamin Franklin)
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