Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Trailer Overhang for powerboats

Expand Messages
  • jeffsprayer
    Looking forward to seeing pics of your conversion, Stan! I am building the AF4 and just might see you on the water here in our Salish Sea if the timing s
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 3, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Looking forward to seeing pics of your conversion, Stan!

      I am building the AF4 and just might see you on the water here in our Salish Sea if the timing's right.

      Jeff,
      Olympia, WA

      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "scr243" <scr243@...> wrote:
      >
      > I am at the final parts of converting a Carolina to a low power cruiser and realized the overhang on the trailer may be a problem. The transom extends out three feet from the trailer supports so that section of the hull is unsupported. This was not a problem when the boat was a sailboat as there was no serious weight on the transom and the hull just had to support itself. Now I have a 4 stroke motor which weighs about 100 lbs on the transom and it seems this might be a problem on long road trips. The transom itself has been reinforced with additional ply to 1 1/4 thickness with an internal brace from transom to bottom and more glass tape between transom and sides/bottom.
      >
      > I would like to hear from AF4 and other powerboat owners about how much, if any, overhang is reasonable on a plywood boat with an outboard. My possible solutions range from buying another trailer (too much expense right now) to building a support bracket that extends out from the trailer to the bottom of the skeg to help support the motor weight.
      >
      > Stan
      >
    • CHARLES
      Here is a link- http://www.wwpotterowners.com/Modification90.html Some of these guys have been carrying outboards this way for 3 decades or more... Chuck P
      Message 2 of 16 , Apr 4, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Here is a link-

        http://www.wwpotterowners.com/Modification90.html

        Some of these guys have been carrying outboards this way for 3 decades or more...

        Chuck P

        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "vtrockminer96" <rockminer@...> wrote:
        >
        > I would definitely use steel plate as part of the mount assembly on the tongue, such as sandwich the steel between two layers of wood for the motor clamps to hold to. I wouldn't trust the strength of wood grain to the types of repetitive loading of a motor bouncing down the highway...
        > - Tim
        >
        > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, john colley <Helliconia54@> wrote:
        > >
        > > My saling friend had his motor mounted upright on a motor mount..Think of a flat steel plate welded to the winch post,a bit like a flag. the motor mounts this plate
        > >
        > >
        > >  
        > > "There is magic in the feel of a paddle and the movement of a canoe, a magic compounded of distance, adventure, solitude, and peace."
        > > -Sigurd Olson
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________
        > > From: Curran Bishop <curranb79@>
        > > To: Michalak <Michalak@yahoogroups.com>
        > > Sent: Wednesday, 3 April 2013 2:10 AM
        > > Subject: Re: [Michalak] Re: Trailer Overhang for powerboats
        > >
        > > Charles, this sounds great, but I can't picture it and would hate to drop
        > > the motor under the trailer at 60 mph - does the mount run in-line with the
        > > trailer (i.e. propeller points perpendicular to the wheel-line)?
        > >
        > >
        > > On Tue, Apr 2, 2013 at 8:47 AM, CHARLES <chuckpierce@> wrote:
        > >
        > > > **
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Stan, I know a lot of folks who install a mount on the front post of the
        > > > trailer (the piece that your winch is installed on). The mount doesn't need
        > > > to be fancy, a couple of pieces of 3/4' ply glued together for thickness
        > > > with a scrap piece of 2x4 as a standoff will do fine. Get a square u-bolt
        > > > to attach it to the post and just put the motor there while trailering. A
        > > > big advantage to this is that you don't have to worry about the weight of
        > > > the motor shockloading the transom of the boat when you hit a pothole...
        > > >
        > > > Chuck P
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "scr243" <scr243@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > I am at the final parts of converting a Carolina to a low power cruiser
        > > > and realized the overhang on the trailer may be a problem. The transom
        > > > extends out three feet from the trailer supports so that section of the
        > > > hull is unsupported. This was not a problem when the boat was a sailboat as
        > > > there was no serious weight on the transom and the hull just had to support
        > > > itself. Now I have a 4 stroke motor which weighs about 100 lbs on the
        > > > transom and it seems this might be a problem on long road trips. The
        > > > transom itself has been reinforced with additional ply to 1 1/4 thickness
        > > > with an internal brace from transom to bottom and more glass tape between
        > > > transom and sides/bottom.
        > > > >
        > > > > I would like to hear from AF4 and other powerboat owners about how much,
        > > > if any, overhang is reasonable on a plywood boat with an outboard. My
        > > > possible solutions range from buying another trailer (too much expense
        > > > right now) to building a support bracket that extends out from the trailer
        > > > to the bottom of the skeg to help support the motor weight.
        > > > >
        > > > > Stan
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > > 
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --
        > > Curran Bishop
        > > 1005 W. Willow St.
        > > Carbondale, IL 62901
        > > phone: 70.pastor.10 or 618.305.5725
        > > http://thebishopspulpit.blogspot.com
        > >
        > > " 'Round our boat be God's aboutness,
        > >       'er we try the depth of sea,
        > >     egg-shell frail for all her stoutness
        > >       unless Thou her helmsman be."
        > >                                 -- Old Scottish Prayer
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
      • Mark
        Hello everyone, I think this is my first post on the forum. Anyway, in regards to your outboard situation a 100 lb motor is a PITA to mount/dismount every
        Message 3 of 16 , Apr 4, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Hello everyone, I think this is my first post on the forum.

          Anyway, in regards to your outboard situation a 100 lb motor is a PITA to mount/dismount every time you want to take your boat out, and if the transom is wood and looks sharp it will get beaten up cosmetically. Both of those may not be an issue for you, in which case removing the motor and mounting it forward is a good choice. Also, you can keep the motor in the boat too. You can make a cradle that you can set in the boat somewhere convenient and then take it out and put it on the trailer when you launch. This would also be helpful in getting your tongue weight forward.

          However, a removable brace as you have mentioned already is going to be faster to setup and more convenient. Wood or metal, doesn't really matter what it is made from but a suggestion is if you go this route have it extend so that it supports the lower unit of the motor in addition to the skeg, unsupported motors bounce around quite a lot. As talked about already, the main concern here in my opinion is going to be tongue weight. You may be able to move your trailer axle a bit too so keep that in mind. The generic answer for tongue weight is 10-15% but in my opinion with a light load such as a wooden boat the more weight in the front the better they track long as you can still lift the tongue and move it by hand.
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.