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Re: [Michalak] Re: TBIII

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  • jhargrovewright2@juno.com
    Sometime shortly after birth, I found that I was not always wright as my name suggests. So, I try to work within my abilities and personal limitations. I
    Message 1 of 44 , Mar 23, 2013
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      Sometime shortly after birth, I found that I was not always "wright" as my name suggests. So, I try to work within my abilities and personal limitations. I have found that anything that requires mixing introduces a variable that is mechanical and does not keep my attention 100%. Yes, I have incorrectly mixed epoxy.....especially in small quantities. I found a way to use small quantities of epoxy...properly mixed! Mix it and freeze it in a bucket large enough so that the epoxy is no more than 1.5" deep... Freeze it immediately before it kicks off. After it is very hard from the freezer, in a flexible plastic bucket(with a lid)....a sharp hit on the bottom it will shatter the pox into a thousand pieces. Keep it cold or it will melt and harden. Then you can take out a small piece....apply it to the joint. It will soften immediately at room temp and start the hardening process. You must keep the epoxy frozen cold or it will kick off. I have used epoxy for a couple of months after mixing.....without a failure. Of course, If you need more than just a dab, mix a batch....carefully. JIB "tightbondlover"

      ---------- Original Message ----------
      From: "rogerinthedr" <jewellfamily@...>
      To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Michalak] Re: TBIII
      Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 15:00:42 -0000


      <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
      I have been using TBIII to glue up my boats. I did have part of one joint fail on the bow of my Laguna build. It was not clamped well, and there was no glue squeeze out in that spot. It was a spot of about 8" right at the bow. In another part of the boat, I put a piece of wood on upside down. After only about two hours, I tried to take it off to fix it, but the glue was already cured enough to cause the plywood to start to tear rather than the glue joint.

      I think TBIII is an excellent glue, but you need to be sure it is well clamped/screwed so that you don't have a huge glob of glue in there (i.e. it's not gap filling stuff). I just did a cooper's mast with TBIII, and it is rock solid with no indications of anything coming apart. I do believe, however, that epoxy is probably superior.

      Roger Jewell

      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "CHARLES" <chuckpierce@...> wrote:
      >
      > It is wonderful that you guys are finally able to put the fire behind you, John. Will we see you in Port Isabel in June?
      >
      > Chuck P
      >
      > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "jhargrovewright2@" <jhargrovewright2@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Tom, As much 100% good experience (many small boats, coopered masts, hatches and on and on) I have had with TBIII, your words have made me wonder..... Caution is always wise. When I get back to building after what will amount to two years of re-building my life after a fire that took almost everything.... including my nose hair clippers, I will build a one sheet super light dingy stitch and glue with TBIII, just to test my skills and glue of choice....and order a couple of gallons of epoxy from duckworks for my next real boat.... I now have a comfortable home, some tools, a big shop and a huge itch to build a boat. I am clearing around a large old live oak, this morning, for a fenced yard for the dogs and us.....then the boat. I have designed three boats during my hiatus. One week to begin boat building, again....Life is good. JIB
      > > ---------- Original Message ----------
      > > From: "tom_the_rower" <ibiubu99@>
      > > To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [Michalak] Re: TBIII
      > > Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 09:23:34 -0000
      > >
      > >
      > > <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
      > > One of the things you mentioned could have been true, after all, who glues up a boat, waits 3 days and then tries to take it apart becuase "something doesn't look right". I think the ribs were not beveled correctly to receive the plywood, and time #2 they were better beveled and the epoxy really did cure. Still, once burned...
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >







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    • Martin Houston
      I use Titebond III on tight joints that I can clamp or use screws & GelMagic epoxy where there is any non perfect fits or voids. I use fasteners when I can,
      Message 44 of 44 , Mar 24, 2013
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        I use Titebond III on tight joints that I can clamp or use screws & GelMagic epoxy where there is any non perfect fits or voids. I use fasteners when I can, usually not on spars. So far I haven't had a joint fail but then, I never boiled a boat.
         


        ________________________________
        From: John Kohnen <jhkohnen@...>
        To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 11:30 PM
        Subject: Re: [Michalak] Re: TBIII

         

        Titebond III may not be "waterproof," but the "water resistant" tests it
        passes are pretty rigorous. Titebond III is a "Type I" glue and Titebond
        II is a "Type II" glue. The below is from Titebond literature:

        "What is the difference between the ANSI/HPVA Type I and Type II
        water-resistance specification?

        "Both of these tests are conducted using 6” by 6” birch laminates glued
        together to make three-ply plywood. The test for Type I is clearly more
        stringent than Type II, and involves boiling the glue bonds and testing the
        specimens while they are wet.

        "Type I testing involves cutting the 6" by 6" assemblies into 1" by 3"
        specimens, boiling them for 4 hours, then baking the specimens in a 145°F
        oven for 20 hours. They are boiled for an additional 4 hours, then
        immediately cooled using running water. The specimens are sheared while
        wet, and the bonds must pass certain strength and wood failure
        requirements to pass the Type I specification.

        "Type II testing involves cutting the 6" by 6" assemblies into 2" by 5"
        specimens, soaking them for 4 hours, then baking the specimens in a
        120°F oven for 19 hours. This is repeated for a total of three cycles, and
        the
        bonds must not delaminate to pass the Type II specification."

        On Sat, 23 Mar 2013 21:53:03 -0700, john c wrote:

        > i think the issue with pva glues, whether 1,2,or 3 is that they are
        > water based and soluable if soaked for long periods.I guiess the label
        > 1,2,and three just indicates how much more water resistant it is.Sure
        > build your boat out of solluable glue.It will be fine untill it gets wet
        > for too long.Until then? its fine.

        --
        John (mailto:jkohnen%40boat-links.com)
        The louder he talks of honour, the faster we count our spoons. (Ralph
        Waldo Emerson)



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