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Re: Building plywood Boats...Cross Post

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  • prairiedog2332
    Great Link Bill I think some builders like to use two layers of glass, one wider and then one narrower so the edges will be easier to be tapered flat. Also 2
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 8, 2013
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      Great Link Bill

      I think some builders like to use two layers of glass, one wider and
      then one narrower so the edges will be easier to be tapered flat. Also 2
      layers of lighter glass may be easier to wet out thoroughly than one
      layer of heavier glass. The chines tend to take the most abuse on a
      flat-bottomed hull. And I guess the shell mounds in Florida can be quite
      abusive.

      Nels
      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Bll" <BGN5731@...> wrote:
      >
      > One of the best short instructions I've seen on how-to-build a plywood
      boat is one that Matt Layden's brother posted showing some messages and
      photos that Matt had sent him.
      >
      > I know no other free example of great small boat workmanship, design,
      and construction using simple tools.
      >
      > Since I have installed only one layer of fiberglass on the seams of
      the three boats I have built, I was quite amazed at the number and size
      of seam coverings that Matt installed. However, Matt has sailed his
      boats to the Bahamas, and in many Florida Everglade Challenges, whereby
      a small lake is a challenge to me!
      >
      > If you have never read/seen this data, you might find it interesting
      as it shows how Matt designs and builds his boats.
      >
      >
      http://physics.bgsu.edu/~layden/FunStuff/Boats/Matt_Boat/matts_boat2005.\
      htm
      >
      > I have cross posted this message, as it might be of interest to
      different boating groups.
      >
      > Bill Nolen
      >
      > OKC
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Martin Houston
      Also light glass goes around corners much easier & lays flatter. Better 2 layers of light than 1 of heavy. ________________________________ From:
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 8, 2013
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        Also light glass goes around corners much easier & lays flatter. Better 2 layers of light than 1 of heavy.



        ________________________________
        From: prairiedog2332 <nelsarv@...>
        To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, March 8, 2013 7:13 PM
        Subject: [Michalak] Re: Building plywood Boats...Cross Post

         

        Great Link Bill

        I think some builders like to use two layers of glass, one wider and
        then one narrower so the edges will be easier to be tapered flat. Also 2
        layers of lighter glass may be easier to wet out thoroughly than one
        layer of heavier glass. The chines tend to take the most abuse on a
        flat-bottomed hull. And I guess the shell mounds in Florida can be quite
        abusive.

        Nels
        --- In mailto:Michalak%40yahoogroups.com, "Bll" <BGN5731@...> wrote:
        >
        > One of the best short instructions I've seen on how-to-build a plywood
        boat is one that Matt Layden's brother posted showing some messages and
        photos that Matt had sent him.
        >
        > I know no other free example of great small boat workmanship, design,
        and construction using simple tools.
        >
        > Since I have installed only one layer of fiberglass on the seams of
        the three boats I have built, I was quite amazed at the number and size
        of seam coverings that Matt installed. However, Matt has sailed his
        boats to the Bahamas, and in many Florida Everglade Challenges, whereby
        a small lake is a challenge to me!
        >
        > If you have never read/seen this data, you might find it interesting
        as it shows how Matt designs and builds his boats.
        >
        >
        http://physics.bgsu.edu/~layden/FunStuff/Boats/Matt_Boat/matts_boat2005.htm
        >
        > I have cross posted this message, as it might be of interest to
        different boating groups.
        >
        > Bill Nolen
        >
        > OKC
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • john colley
        I ll second that!,I have downloaded these bks and thay are quite informative.When I built my stormbringer (17ft pirogue) i used the information i found in
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 10, 2013
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          I'll second that!,I have downloaded these bks and thay are quite informative.When I built my "stormbringer" (17ft pirogue) i used the information i found in John Welsford's book,The backyard boat builder".It describes the boats in his catalogue and how they came about, but in the first part of the book he talks of stitch and glue and other things.Excellent read>


           
          "There is magic in the feel of a paddle and the movement of a canoe, a magic compounded of distance, adventure, solitude, and peace."
          -Sigurd Olson


          ________________________________
          From: Andres Espino <ima_very_cool_cowboy@...>
          To: "Michalak@yahoogroups.com" <Michalak@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, 9 March 2013 3:44 AM
          Subject: Re: [Michalak] Building plywood Boats...Cross Post


           
          Jeff Spira also has 3 free eBooks about making plywood boats but his designs are mostly dories..  They are great books and he has some videos also

          http://www.spirainternational.com/hp_free.html

          Andrew

          ________________________________
          From: Bll <BGN5731@...>
          To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, March 8, 2013 8:38 AM
          Subject: [Michalak] Building plywood Boats...Cross Post


           
          One of the best short instructions I've seen on how-to-build a plywood boat is one that Matt Layden's brother posted showing some messages and photos that Matt had sent him.

          I know no other free example of great small boat workmanship, design, and construction using simple tools.

          Since I have installed only one layer of fiberglass on the seams of the three boats I have built, I was quite amazed at the number and size of seam coverings that Matt installed. However, Matt has sailed his boats to the Bahamas, and in many Florida Everglade Challenges, whereby a small lake is a challenge to me!

          If you have never read/seen this data, you might find it interesting as it shows how Matt designs and builds his boats.

          http://physics.bgsu.edu/~layden/FunStuff/Boats/Matt_Boat/matts_boat2005.htm

          I have cross posted this message, as it might be of interest to different boating groups.

          Bill Nolen

          OKC

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • prairiedog2332
          Just an observation but I don t see any obvious to me advantages to these methods over the Michalak/Payson build books. Their books do not require any building
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 11, 2013
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            Just an observation but I don't see any obvious to me advantages to
            these methods over the Michalak/Payson build books.

            Their books do not require any building jigs, frames nor stringers -
            just the bulkheads - which become a part of the boat and provide the
            flotation or shelter. Maybe an additional temporary bulkhead at the
            widest part of the hull that can be re-used to make the rudder and
            leeboard. Less solid lumber framing, less sawing and less weight in the
            final product.


            And Payson shows not even requiring holes in the panels for ties in his
            tack and tape method. Just some tacks (small nails) and masking or duct
            tape to hold the panels in place prior to sealing the seams with goop.
            Plus a temporary "Spanish windlass" to close up the ends and maybe a
            temporary brace to hold them. But his designs use 1/4" plywood which
            allows for easy bends. His second last build book is still a classic in
            my mind. As are all his writings which is what got this whole thing
            going along with the drawing genius of Phil Bolger

            http://www.instantboats.com/btnib.htm


            Not sure if Welsford's book has ever been available in North America.
            His writings and plans are awesome, but maybe more work to bring into
            reality. You end up with a classic whereas Jim's and Phil's are just
            plain "plain" for the most part by comparison.

            Nels

            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, john colley <Helliconia54@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'll second that!,I have downloaded these bks and thay are quite
            informative.When I built my "stormbringer" (17ft pirogue) i used the
            information i found in John Welsford's book,The backyard boat
            builder".It describes the boats in his catalogue and how they came
            about, but in the first part of the book he talks of stitch and glue and
            other things.Excellent read>
            >
            >
            > Â
            > "There is magic in the feel of a paddle and the movement of a canoe, a
            magic compounded of distance, adventure, solitude, and peace."
            > -Sigurd Olson
            >
            >




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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