Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [Michalak] Re: Piccup Pram - Lumber Questions

Expand Messages
  • John Trussell
    For most small boats, ‘natural wood’ (as opposed to plywood) is used in part as stiffeners and in part as glue/clamping blocks. IMHO. neither of these
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 4, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      For most small boats, ‘natural wood’ (as opposed to plywood) is used in part
      as stiffeners and in part as glue/clamping blocks. IMHO. neither of these
      applications is extraordinarily critical and lumber with dimensions plus or
      minus ¼ inch are acceptable.



      JohnT



      _____

      From: Michalak@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Michalak@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      Of Andres Espino
      Sent: Monday, March 04, 2013 2:16 PM
      To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [Michalak] Re: Piccup Pram - Lumber Questions





      when the lumberyard planes down standard 1" inch board it becomes 3/4 thick.

      Most people who draw up plans for boats want true lumber dimensions (where
      1in is actually 1in) but a lot like Jim Michalak and Jeff Spira take that
      into account in their plans which makes home building easier.

      Andrew

      ________________________________
      From: boat2swim wgussin@... <mailto:wgussin%40gmail.com> >
      To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Michalak%40yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, March 4, 2013 5:38 AM
      Subject: [Michalak] Re: Piccup Pram - Lumber Questions



      Forgive me if I am being dense, but I don't understand what you mean by:
      "3/4 is standard 1" lumber." I do have Jim's book (assuming you are
      referring to Boatbuilding for Beginners (and Beyond), and I have read
      through entirely, but haven't found the answers to these questions. Can you
      point me to certain sections?

      I am located in Southeastern Vermont, in a town called Brattleboro.

      Thanks for the help!

      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Michalak%40yahoogroups.com> , Eugene
      Dixon wrote:
      >
      > Hi Willie
      > Â Welcome to piccup club.Â
      > Â Â Â Most of us buy stock lumber--1x4Â 1x6 2x4 ect, and rip/cut to
      size, Thre Redwood for gennels  is mostly for looks.
      > If you havent IMs book you really need to get it, it well anser 99% of
      questions
      >  example:: 3/4 is standard 1" lumber,  lengths are basicaly gut to
      fit need.
      > Eugene  located in Oklahoma
      > Â Â Â where are you located?
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Willie Gussin
      > To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Michalak%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Sunday, March 3, 2013 8:40 PM
      > Subject: [Michalak] Piccup Pram - Lumber Questions
      >
      >
      > Â
      >
      > Hello Everyone!
      >
      > I have begun working on a Piccup Pram! I know almost nothing about
      > woodworking, but I knew even less before I started this project; it really
      > is an amazing learning process, and I really appreciate that.
      >
      > These questions are very basic, but I hope you don't mind taking a moment
      > to enlighten me.
      >
      > Okay, the materials list calls for two 12' pine 2x4's and one 12' redwood
      > 1x4. What is the redwood used on? Does it specify somewhere on the plans?
      > Also, the lumber pieces described in the specifications include many sizes
      > of lumber, but not lengths. Do I need to get each of these pieces (a 1
      1/2"
      > x 3/4", a 1 1/2" x 1 1/2", a 3/4" x 7/8", etc.) from the two pieces of
      > pine? There is also a 3 1/2" x 1 1/2" in the specifications for the skeg,
      > this is going to use almost an entire 2 x 4 right? Can it be a half inch
      > larger by both dimensions and just not cut the 2 x 4? Also, will the
      > lumberyard rip these boards for me into all of the different sizes? Are
      > some of them flexible measurements and some of them are definite? Are
      there
      > procedures somewhere on how to get all of these pieces out of the lumber
      on
      > the materials list?
      >
      > I think one of the main issues (besides the lack of knowledge) is that I
      > don't have any excess wood sitting around from other projects, so I need
      to
      > buy and cut all lumber used.
      >
      > Thank you so much to anyone who takes the time to explain any of these
      > questions I am having!
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • prairiedog2332
      Very good point made by John T. In traditional boat building terms this is often referred to as Scantlings . It is interesting to note that Bolger tended
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 4, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Very good point made by John T.

        In "traditional boat building " terms this is often referred to as
        "Scantlings". It is interesting to note that Bolger tended to go with
        as light as possible and many builders increased them and Jim being a
        great believer in Bolger's work tended to design his with a bit heavier
        scantlings as a result. Also the dimensional lumber and plywood these
        days are not as good as back in Bolger's earlier "instant boats" days.

        It also depends on the boat. For example in a light rowing design you
        can go a bit lighter. Just enough dimension to hold the fasteners of
        your choice. Ring nails don't need much to hold tenaciously when
        combined with a good glue. Just make sure you hit the bulkhead frame
        wood with the nails. And with stitch and tape you don't need anything
        for the lightest strength /weight ratio.

        If wanting to use a motor, then don't scrimp with the transom framing
        though - both bow and stern - nor the stem on a pointy design.

        Jim also prefers to use lumber, (1x4) rather than plywood for the
        backing plates in in a butt joint so they can be locked in with ring
        nails or screws rather than having to "clinch" copper wire nails as
        Payson does in his Bolger designs which require a helper to do right.

        As a side note my lumber yard often stocks tropical mahogany cheaper
        than clear fir. For those worried about the "rain forest" depletion,
        clear fir comes from the west coast rain forests.

        Nels

        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "John Trussell" <jtrussell2@...> wrote:
        >
        > For most small boats, `natural wood' (as opposed to plywood)
        is used in part
        > as stiffeners and in part as glue/clamping blocks. IMHO. neither of
        these
        > applications is extraordinarily critical and lumber with dimensions
        plus or
        > minus ¼ inch are acceptable.

        > JohnT
        >
        >




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.