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Re: keelson slash shoe considerations

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  • Tim Anderson
    I usually look at the engine manufacturers suggested mount angle and hight, use that as a starting point, wrap the transom with .125 aluminum to protect the
    Message 1 of 20 , Oct 31, 2012
      I usually look at the engine manufacturers suggested mount angle and hight,
      use that as a starting point, wrap the transom with .125 aluminum to
      protect the fiberglass. Take it out and run it with a GPS to see what
      happens. Return to boat ramp, remove motor and aluminum, add a 3/4" lift,
      remount aluminum and motor go test again. After i am happy with the results
      i pull the motor and aluminum, glue on any additional material and then
      wash the aluminum with denatured rubbing alcohol before gluing it into
      place. Have fun. Tim P Anderson


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • a9b5az
      well, well, well. it is amazing how fast three years can go by and how much work I can avoid during that time !! boat work anyway. so, now that I ve found the
      Message 2 of 20 , Nov 2, 2015
        well, well, well. it is amazing how fast three years can go by and how much work I can avoid during that time !! boat work anyway.

        so, now that I've found the yahoo info and gotten another password and found this topic, I'm ready to add to it.

        The AF bottom is now at 1-3/8". At the 5/8" thickness it made a great box drum. I could bounce tools clean off of the bottom while getting the beat going. Yes I know I am building a slow boat.

        I've decided to really use the clam skiff shoe plan and laminate plywood onto the bottom like Payson did it. So the center of the hull will be around 3" thick. If you've ever encountered a drifting tree or piling while running at night in Alaska you will understand my appreciation for sturdy.

        So my question about the construction sequence is still rumbling around. I think maybe the issue of the corners of the shoe being glassable might be addressed by cutting cloth strips at a 45d angle to the weave. I read that it helps get sharper corners. More rounded corners might call for an extra layer of plywood for more depth.

        I am fairly well weathered out of any more glass work this year unless of course the climate actually does warm up before next spring.

        The inside seams are all filleted and glassed with 3" and 6" glass tape. The lazarette hatch space is partly framed in. there is a centerline 3/4" ply divider making a massive thrust truss, and a 2x6 athwartship making a massive tie-in between the transom and the divider. There will be 2 WT hatch covers making access to the space. It can hold 4 to 6 OB gas cans, but I won't carry fuel in there. Once the bottom is finished and the boat flipped upright I'll start on the foredeck and cockpit. I am thinking about setting up the cockpit area something like D'arcy Bryn to make the boat self bailing. Those of you in the recent TX rains probably know how fast a boat can sink if it can't free itself. 13" near my son's area!

        I made some progress on the Aeolus dory I've been rescueing. I added an inch of plywood in two layers to the original bottom, removed the OB well, nasty displacement killing thing the way it was, and I put in great chunks of douglas fir as "cleats" between each frame pair. the bottom is reinforced every direction now, ready for the glass. Inside I scraped the finish at the chine, side, bottom junction and filleted with chopped glass reinforcement. The entire boat has transformed from something akin to a viking era vessel in terms of longitudinal stiffness into a monolithic assembly that is radically stiff now, won't be able to leak, and probably will have picked up a half knot for the same effort. There was a long term separation of the bottom from the chine at one frame bay, probably from someone jumping into the boat from a dock or some such. It was hidden by the cover piece that Grunwald used to hide the plywood edge grain. This looked like an external chine, but relied on not great glue and small brass screws and paint to hold it all together. I can hardly wait to get him back in the salt and see how fast he goes. I got 4+ mph with effort, 3.5 was pretty easy, light ship. He's several times cleaner now and the glass + graphite treatment should make him pretty slippery. Looking forward to getting a half ton aboard and trying for some distance. You know, later, after the local warming and dry skies kick in and let me do the pleine aire glass work.

        So, that's a lot of hot air for one night, but after all it has been THREE YEARS. YIKES!

        good night all and, let's keep the AF bottom info a secret from JimM, OK? I don't want his name associated with it if it sinks . . . ;)

        Az
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