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Re: Michalak article... Re: [Michalak] Re: How added crew weight can effect self-righting in a sharpie.

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  • Andres Espino
    Thats a great offer... this Buccaneer hand the economy has eaten all my cash at present.  I have over $6,000 into thids refurb so far.  I dont have money to
    Message 1 of 53 , Aug 31, 2012
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      Thats a great offer... this Buccaneer hand the economy has eaten all my cash at present.  I have over $6,000 into thids refurb so far.  I dont have money to do anything else

      Andrew



      ________________________________
      From: joe_mapango <ccurtis-keyword-crusing.65bae6@...>
      To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, August 31, 2012 11:20 AM
      Subject: Michalak article... Re: [Michalak] Re: How added crew weight can effect self-righting in a sharpie.


       
      That's a tough call Andrew. Hindsight is often 20/20. FYI, there is a jessie cooper up here in the Pacific NW for around 6K (I think). I can track it down if your interested. I think the JC is a great boat, and does many things the Buccanner (or vertually all plastic boats) cannot do and more easily. I have a stunngly clean newer Santana 32.5 and as sweet as she is, ANY of bolgers boxes would be an easier boat to "manage". While on the subject of boats, I think Jim's "BoxTop" is a far better AS29 than the AS29 (no offence Phil!). If I wanted to build a Carribean/costal cruising mono for one or two, I think BoxTop is right up there at the top as far as features, capability, and ease of build go. If you change your mind, there is always time.

      Hey, I'll make you a deal. Come up here to the Pacific NW stay in my little cabin and build two Boxtops (or AS29's) in my barn. I'll pay for the wood, you provide the labor. Stay in the cabin for free until your done!

      Chris Curtis
      S/V Romany
      curtisfamilyadventures.wordpress.com

      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Andres Espino <ima_very_cool_cowboy@...> wrote:
      >
      > Bolger created a new line called the Advanced Sharpies and the AS-19 and AS-29 but Jessie Cooper is the one I was really taken with I like that rear bedroom.. which incidentally my Buccaneer 24 has...  but not as spacious.  i think maybe they got the ides from Bolger it was in 1974 they did it.
      >
      > In that Jessie cooper article Bolger remarks how he wasn't sure the joints and fittings would stand up to life in the ocean but you know he always under-rated his boats.  The AS-29 has the same fittings.
      >
      > There is a great article about someone sailing the AS-19 and with pics and everything...
      > http://mkstocks.tripod.com/boats/as19/
      >
      >
      > http://www.ace.net.au/schooner/as19.htm#start
      >
      > I never grew to gain admiration for Dutch Leeboards.. LOL  I don't so much mind the squareness.  Long Micro with the keel was noticably absent that leeboard.
      >
      > I think of Michalak's designs the Viola which comes in a 26 also is close to Bolger's Martha Jane which was a water ballasted extra long Micro.  VIOLA comes in a 22 and a 26.  JM compares the Viola 22 favorably with a Catalina 22 in many
      >
      > Viola22 - cabin sailboat - 22' x 7'
      > Viola26 - cabin sailboat - 26' x 7'
      > and Viola appears to be a stretched Musicbox 3
      > Musicbox2- cabin sailboat - 15' x 6.5'
      > Musicbox3- cabin sailboat - 15' x 6.5'
      >
      > I have almost $6,000 inot fixing up this old factory boat and i am starting to get regrets that i did not simply build a JM boat to start with.
      >
      > Andrew
      >
      >
      >
      > .
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: graeme <graeme19121984@...>
      > To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 9:37 PM
      > Subject: Michalak article... Re: [Michalak] Re: How added crew weight can effect self-righting in a sharpie.
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      >
      > A Great Pelican about equates with a Long Micro, no? I'd shell out for plans of a Long Micro Navigator, and I'd like it a 25% (3 sheets) stretch to about 24ft - not much extra expense or work (maybe even an 8ft plug), but it would increase range beyond civilisation nicely by the extra capacity to carry stores and keep the boat brewer in out of the sun. There's bigger than Long Micro in the series, 30, 40, 55ft... but if I wanted that size I'd probbly go for a different boat or used. There's Cormorant and Caprice which also would do nicely for most of what I'd have in mind for a LM distance coastal cruiser.
      >
      > Graeme
      >
      > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Andres Espino <ima_very_cool_cowboy@> wrote:
      >
      > > Long Micro is for the other 5%.
      >
      > > A SF Great Pelican (with added keel) sailed from San Diego to Hawaii and a Micro is far more stable IMHO than that.  i would compare it with a Cal 20 which is in john Vigors book "Twenty Small Sailboats to Take You Anywhere"
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rob Kellock
      Hajo, what you describe below, as heaving to, sounds to me more like deliberately catching yourself in irons . With no sail up front to oppose the mainsail,
      Message 53 of 53 , Sep 10, 2012
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        Hajo, what you describe below, as heaving to, sounds to me more like deliberately catching yourself "in irons". With no sail up front to oppose the mainsail, you are relying 100% on the rudder to maintain your attitude, which surely, would be pointing almost directly into the wind with the peak of the sail luffing while the foot is being held taut. There's a high probability you would end up sailing backwards and even if that isn't so, all you need is an unexpected wave to overpower the rudder and shunt the boat sideways and you've got a guaranteed capsize, with the mainsheet being made off and no forward speed.

        I'm definitely one of Chuck's purists, but I think his method is the closest approximation to heaving to that a single sailed boat has, but even here, you are still moving forward reasonably quickly, compared to a sloop heaving to... and relying on your rudder to maintain state.

        To me, heaving to (in a sailing sense, not the literal, which is to linger), means, two or more sets of sails opposing each other to cause a boat to slide slowly sideways in a constant safe state regardless of the windspeed or sea state. Heaving to should not rely on the rudder and part of its appeal is that it avoids the rudder needing to be used at all, the tiller being tied to leeward so that large waves will not break the rudder as the boat is pushed sideways.

        Regardless of how we argue this, I still find little merit in attempting to heave to in what are essentially dinghy's. In my experience with any kind of sail up, the boat moves too fast to really relax and attend to other tasks.

        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Hajo Smulders <hajosmulders@...> wrote:
        >
        > I did it on my mixer2 all the time by being able to haul my traveller to
        > windward. Put traveller to leeward, over sheet (which you should normally
        > never do with a balanced lug) put tiller over to windward at about 30
        > degrees. People have been heaving to way before we invented the sloop rig.
        > "aanleggen" is described in Dutch texts hundreds of years ago. Conrad
        > mentions it as well.
        >
        > Hajo Smulders
        > Sent from my mobile
        >
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