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Wider Leeboard

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  • prairiedog2332
    Here is Gary s DW article on his experience with a wider leeboard on a piccup pram. http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/12/howto/leeboard/index.html
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 6, 2012
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      Here is Gary's DW article on his experience with a wider leeboard on a
      piccup pram.

      http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/12/howto/leeboard/index.html
      <http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/12/howto/leeboard/index.html>

      This indicates to me that improvement in performance would justify
      considering doing this. Piccup was Jim's earliest design (1990) and I
      have to wonder if some of the others designed at that time might also
      benefit from making the board a bit wider? AF2-3 and Piccup Squared
      come to mind. Also it might be an idea if deciding to go with a larger
      sail area if winds are generally on the light side in your area in
      summer or you sail at higher elevations.

      Seems to me being able to go upwind at about 50 degrees off it should be
      acheivable. The thing is that with a GPS a person can check their track
      pretty acurately which was not possible when these designs first came
      out. Of course there is more to it than just the underwater foils. The
      type and cut of the sail and it's rigging set-up and spars also play
      into it as well as the weight balance on these small hulls.

      Anybody going to the Boat Festival in Oklahoma will get the opportunity
      to get Jim's take on this as well as the latest on Mik Storer's and
      other designers thoughts on improving sailing performance. And I hope
      you update us all if you attend.

      I think most of us are not that performance oriented but still - having
      the knowledge ain't gonna hurt. Jim wrote one time about his experience
      with a Piccup with a larger sial off a Woobo.

      "I'd even had the occasion to chase down a large Catalina with the
      thing. If you have a fancy yacht and find yourself getting chewed up by
      a plywood box flying a cloud of blue polytarp you'd best turn to weather
      and crank up the winches. On a reach or run a big lug sail is tough to
      beat."

      Nels





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Scot Mc Pherson
      Nels, My only single gripe about this post is the use of the word performance. A boat is a performance boat when it excels at each of your
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 6, 2012
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        Nels,
        My only single gripe about this post is the use of the word performance. A
        boat is a performance boat when it excels at each of your
        expectations...nothing more nothing less...

        A racing boat has good performance when it speeds along nicely

        A cruising boat has good performance when you feel safe and comfortable in
        rougher than ordinary seas.

        Both of these are performance boats.

        Sorry, it's a small gripe, but a gripe non-the-less...Calling the meeting
        of one specification (speed in this case) "performance" to me is just as
        bad as calling above average "excellent", or something interesting being
        called "awesome" or made up predicate nominatives used as actual verbs like
        "Waitressing". The verb is "to wait" not "to waitress".

        /end gripe


        Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA
        Old Lyme, CT, USA
        Le Claire, IA, USA
        Scot McPherson | Linkedin <https://www.linkedin.com/in/scotmcpherson>


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • prairiedog2332
        Scot, My use of the word performance in reference to a wider leeboard was intended to apply to the ability of a hull to sail to weather. If you have ever
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 6, 2012
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          Scot,

          My use of the word "performance" in reference to a wider leeboard was
          intended to apply to the ability of a hull to sail to weather. If you
          have ever been out in a boat that could not perform in that regard it
          could be a problem.

          Been there, done that when a front came through and winds increased
          dramatically and had a heck of a time getting back to the dock we had
          launched from. Winds too strong for rowing, no motor, and the shoreline
          too shallow and rocky to risk schmuking the daggerboard.

          Made me a great believer in Jim's leeboard design and his recommendation
          to have a reliable motor - just in case.

          Nels


          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Scot Mc Pherson <scot.mcpherson@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Nels,
          > My only single gripe about this post is the use of the word
          performance. A
          > boat is a performance boat when it excels at each of your
          > expectations...nothing more nothing less...
          >
          > A racing boat has good performance when it speeds along nicely
          >
          > A cruising boat has good performance when you feel safe and
          comfortable in
          > rougher than ordinary seas.
          >
          > Both of these are performance boats.
          >
          > Sorry, it's a small gripe, but a gripe non-the-less...Calling the
          meeting
          > of one specification (speed in this case) "performance" to me is just
          as
          > bad as calling above average "excellent", or something interesting
          being
          > called "awesome" or made up predicate nominatives used as actual verbs
          like
          > "Waitressing". The verb is "to wait" not "to waitress".
          >
          > /end gripe
          >
          >
          > Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA
          > Old Lyme, CT, USA
          > Le Claire, IA, USA
          > Scot McPherson | Linkedin <https://www.linkedin.com/in/scotmcpherson>
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Scot Mc Pherson
          Nels, I know...I wasn t targetting you....It s just a pet pieve of mine the way the language is used. Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA Old Lyme, CT, USA Le
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 6, 2012
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            Nels,
            I know...I wasn't targetting you....It's just a pet pieve of mine the way
            the language is used.


            Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA
            Old Lyme, CT, USA
            Le Claire, IA, USA
            Scot McPherson | Linkedin <https://www.linkedin.com/in/scotmcpherson>


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Scot McPherson
            Yes but don t is supposed to have one also :) Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA Old Lyme, CT Le Claire, IA http://www.linkedin.com/in/scotmcpherson Sent from my
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 6, 2012
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              Yes but "don't" is supposed to have one also :)

              Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA
              Old Lyme, CT
              Le Claire, IA
              http://www.linkedin.com/in/scotmcpherson
              Sent from my iPhone

              On Jun 6, 2012, at 5:10 PM, "D.G. Cassidy" <d.cassidy@...> wrote:

              > In your usage, "that's" is correct with the apostrophe.
              > It is a contraction for "that is," and contractions always get an apostrophe.
              >
              > On Jun 6, 2012, at 3:46 PM, Scot Mc Pherson wrote:
              >
              > > Or apostrophe check either apparently.
              > >
              > > Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA
              > > Old Lyme, CT, USA
              > > Le Claire, IA, USA
              > > Scot McPherson | Linkedin <https://www.linkedin.com/in/scotmcpherson>
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > On Wed, Jun 6, 2012 at 2:46 PM, Scot Mc Pherson <scot.mcpherson@...>wrote:
              > >
              > >> Yeah, that's because I type too fast and I dont use spell check often
              > >> enough :)
              > >>
              > >>
              > >> Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA
              > >> Old Lyme, CT, USA
              > >> Le Claire, IA, USA
              > >> Scot McPherson | Linkedin <https://www.linkedin.com/in/scotmcpherson>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >> On Wed, Jun 6, 2012 at 2:37 PM, prairiedog2332 <nelsarv@...>wrote:
              > >>
              > >>> **
              > >>>
              > >>>
              > >>>
              > >>> Yes - I have a retired English prof friend who is a member of the
              > >>> language police. Spelling bothers some folks as well. Where I come from
              > >>> "targeting" has one "t" and a pet "peeve" has no "i".
              > >>>
              > >>> Nels:-)
              > >>>
              > >>>
              > >>> --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Scot Mc Pherson <scot.mcpherson@...>
              > >>> wrote:
              > >>>>
              > >>>> Nels,
              > >>>> I know...I wasn't targetting you....It's just a pet pieve of mine the
              > >>> way
              > >>>> the language is used.
              > >>>>
              > >>>>
              > >>>> Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA
              > >>>> Old Lyme, CT, USA
              > >>>> Le Claire, IA, USA
              > >>>> Scot McPherson | Linkedin <https://www.linkedin.com/in/scotmcpherson>
              > >>>>
              > >>>>
              > >>>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >>>>
              > >>>
              > >>>
              > >>>
              > >>
              > >>
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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