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Chinese Manufactured Underlayment

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  • prairiedog2332
    After considerable research - both on the Internet and with personal testing - it has lead me to ascertain that Chinese manufactured underlayment has a couple
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 2, 2012
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      After considerable research - both on the Internet and with personal
      testing - it has lead me to ascertain that Chinese manufactured
      underlayment has a couple of potential flaws. One being a shoddy lack of
      quality control. Some may be fine and others very poor even in the same
      Brand group. The main problem is in getting sheets that have a
      consistent glue line thickness. Next problem is the internal plies that
      are poorer quality than the skin plies. The internal plies may soak up
      much of the glue and lead to a starved joint and eventual delamination
      or blistering as moisture gets in.

      One flooring site claims you can test a sheet by holding it upright and
      bending it towards you with weight on your hands while bracing the
      center with your knee. Starved joints will show up as wrinkles or
      blisters in the outer ply that faces you. I have also found with
      dishwasher testing that one outer layer may wrinkle and the other stay
      sound.

      Rot spores and microbes, according to Jagels, require 4 things in order
      to survive. Food i.e. cellulose. Moisture, oxygen, and warmth. Keep out
      at least two and you should be fine. A waterproof glue line of the
      proper thickness - and the more the better - prevent moisture from
      getting into the inner plies. Epoxy encapsulation - especially on the
      edge grain and compatible paint to protect the epoxy is considered the
      best way to protect the outer layers according to Jagels.

      North American and European plywoods have the best quality control
      standards whether it is underlayment, exterior grade or marine grade,
      and of course offer the best warranties. I have also heard that having a
      "Bs1088" stamp on a Chinese plywood means nothing.

      MDO is the best choice pricewise in my view although it is not available
      in 1/4" thickness 5/16" is the thinnest as the overlay takes up 1/16".
      If you require thinner then the Bs6566 Meranti 6 mm is my choice.

      http://www.noahsboatbuilding.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=MER65666%2E&eq=&Tp
      <http://www.noahsboatbuilding.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=MER65666%2E&eq=&Tp> =

      I think it is worthwhile to estimate the overall cost to build your
      boat, including the woods for masts and framing, the sail plan and
      strings, epoxy and paint, anchors and motor etc,, and all the other
      stuff. And then decide if paying extra for better plywood is worth it.
      Maybre about 15% more?

      Nels







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • john colley
      In Australia they have their own standard for marine ply which is above 1088. A grade faces and quality timber,but expensive and heavy.Using Hoop pine.
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 2, 2012
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        In Australia they have their own standard for marine ply which is above 1088."A" grade faces and quality timber,but expensive and heavy.Using Hoop pine.

        http://www.australply.com.au/pr_marine.html

         
        "There is magic in the feel of a paddle and the movement of a canoe, a magic compounded of distance, adventure, solitude, and peace."
        -Sigurd Olson


        ________________________________
        From: prairiedog2332 <nelsarv@...>
        To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, 3 February 2012 10:27 AM
        Subject: [Michalak] Chinese Manufactured Underlayment


         


        North American and European plywoods have the best quality control
        standards whether it is underlayment, exterior grade or marine grade,
        and of course offer the best warranties. I have also heard that having a
        "Bs1088" stamp on a Chinese plywood means nothing.

        MDO is the best choice pricewise in my view although it is not available
        in 1/4" thickness 5/16" is the thinnest as the overlay takes up 1/16".
        If you require thinner then the Bs6566 Meranti 6 mm is my choice.

        http://www.noahsboatbuilding.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=MER65666%2E&eq=&Tp
        <http://www.noahsboatbuilding.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=MER65666%2E&eq=&Tp> =

        I think it is worthwhile to estimate the overall cost to build your
        boat, including the woods for masts and framing, the sail plan and
        strings, epoxy and paint, anchors and motor etc,, and all the other
        stuff. And then decide if paying extra for better plywood is worth it.
        Maybre about 15% more?

        Nels

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • prairiedog2332
        I have heard nothing but good things about the plywood you mention, as well as plantation grown hoop pine in dimensional lumber as well. Very similar to
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 3, 2012
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          I have heard nothing but good things about the plywood you mention, as
          well as plantation grown hoop pine in dimensional lumber as well. Very
          similar to Douglas Fir in weight I guess?

          When the work and effort to grow it - and quality control standards in
          manufacturing - are taken into consideration, it certainly seems logical
          it would cost much more than the Chinese products.

          Nels


          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, john colley <Helliconia54@...> wrote:
          >
          > In Australia they have their own standard for marine ply which is
          above 1088."A" grade faces and quality timber,but expensive and
          heavy.Using Hoop pine.
          >
          > http://www.australply.com.au/pr_marine.html
          >
          > Â
          > "There is magic in the feel of a paddle and the movement of a canoe, a
          magic compounded of distance, adventure, solitude, and peace."
          > -Sigurd Olson
          >
        • john colley
          I comes down to the timber used in the laminates in the end,As far as weight is concerned.I believe hoop pine is heavier than maranti . There is magic in the
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 3, 2012
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            I comes down to the timber used in the laminates in the end,As far as weight is concerned.I believe hoop pine is heavier than maranti .

            "There is magic in the feel of a paddle and the movement of a canoe, a magic compounded of distance, adventure, solitude, and peace."
            -Sigurd Olson


            ________________________________
            From: prairiedog2332 <nelsarv@...>
            To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, 4 February 2012 4:30 AM
            Subject: [Michalak] Re: Chinese Manufactured Underlayment


             

            I have heard nothing but good things about the plywood you mention, as
            well as plantation grown hoop pine in dimensional lumber as well. Very
            similar to Douglas Fir in weight I guess?

            When the work and effort to grow it - and quality control standards in
            manufacturing - are taken into consideration, it certainly seems logical
            it would cost much more than the Chinese products.

            Nels

            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, john colley <Helliconia54@...> wrote:
            >
            > In Australia they have their own standard for marine ply which is
            above 1088."A" grade faces and quality timber,but expensive and
            heavy.Using Hoop pine.
            >
            > http://www.australply.com.au/pr_marine.html
            >
            > Â
            > "There is magic in the feel of a paddle and the movement of a canoe, a
            magic compounded of distance, adventure, solitude, and peace."
            > -Sigurd Olson
            >




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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