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RE: [Michalak] Re: Family Skiff in the Texas 200 Photos

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  • John and Kathy Trussell
    I’m an old guy with a variety of infirmities. I recently sold my LFH17 because the seating was very low and it was difficult for me to get up and down. I am
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 6, 2011
      I’m an old guy with a variety of infirmities. I recently sold my LFH17
      because the seating was very low and it was difficult for me to get up and
      down. I am replacing the LFH17 with a Beach Pea peapod which I selected
      because the thwarts are about 10 “ above the floorboards (as opposed to
      about 4” on the LFH17).



      The minimum seat height to allow comfort will, of course, vary with the
      height of the individual. 10” to 12” will probably work for a lot of folks.
      However, it is probably worthwhile to build a mock up of a seat and try it
      out before building thwarts into a boat. In some cases, it may be possible
      to raise thwarts along the sides of a boat by a couple of inches (at the
      expense of back support). Everything about a boat is a compromise and
      changing one element will affect others with consequences—both intended and
      unintended. On the other hand, one of the glories of building your own boat
      is that you can build it to suit yourself and not some hypothetical
      ‘average’ person dreamed up by a marketer.



      JohnT

      _____

      From: Michalak@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Michalak@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      Of scr243
      Sent: Tuesday, July 05, 2011 1:22 PM
      To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Michalak] Re: Family Skiff in the Texas 200 Photos





      You have to have a seat a minimum height above the floor to do much good for
      comfort issues. I tried a board seat at the chine level in the Piccup during
      the 2008 Tex 200 and it worked to allow me to face forward while sailing but
      was not high enough to do much for comfort. You might build a temporary set
      of brackets that hang on the gunwales and allow you to test out different
      seat heights. On a low freeboard boat the best option might be just strong
      side decks that you can sit on. Of course, as you sit higher in the boat
      your CG moves up and the boat stability goes rapidly downhill. This would
      not present much of a problem in light constant winds (less than 12 mph) but
      would require some racing dinghy acrobatics when the wind was strong or
      inconsistent. Also, the boom is harder to duck since it is lower relative to
      your head.

      Stan

      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Michalak%40yahoogroups.com> , Eugene
      Dixon <edixon193941@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi Stan
      >  Ref: Piccup Pram.  I have same problem with my pram as you do.
      > Only difference is I have alot of years on you., lower back want allow
      me to set  in bottom.
      > Â Â Am tinkering with adding bench seats down sides 14 to 15 inch's
      width.
      >  with your experience what would be your thoughts?
      > Â
      > Â Â Eugene
      > Port of Catoosa:
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      > >
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      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jon Larson
      I m another old guy with bad knees. The bench seats in my Ladybug were 10 inches off the floor. I had difficulty getting up and down and was generally
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 6, 2011
        I'm another old guy with bad knees. The bench seats in my Ladybug were 10 inches off the floor. I had difficulty getting up and down and was generally uncomfortable. Out came the benches and the cockpit is open. I sit comfortably on my ice chest which is 16 inches off the floor (including the cushion) and can stretch out in all directions. I can move side to side, front to back and can lurch to the gunwales when it gets exciting. The floor is covered with plastic lattice from Home Depot (thank you Chuck) which gives good traction when I move around. The open area is perfect for my air matress if I decide to sleep in the boat, which is my last choice. Yes, visibility is impaired but I've still got enough flexibility to look around. I haven't been decapitated by the boom so far - but give me time. Fair winds...

        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "scr243" <scr243@...> wrote:
        >
        > You have to have a seat a minimum height above the floor to do much good for comfort issues. I tried a board seat at the chine level in the Piccup during the 2008 Tex 200 and it worked to allow me to face forward while sailing but was not high enough to do much for comfort. You might build a temporary set of brackets that hang on the gunwales and allow you to test out different seat heights. On a low freeboard boat the best option might be just strong side decks that you can sit on. Of course, as you sit higher in the boat your CG moves up and the boat stability goes rapidly downhill. This would not present much of a problem in light constant winds (less than 12 mph) but would require some racing dinghy acrobatics when the wind was strong or inconsistent. Also, the boom is harder to duck since it is lower relative to your head.
        >
        > Stan
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