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A couple of questions for you guys from a newbie-

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  • CHARLES
    I know a couple of you, but for the rest, I have been lurking here for some time-sail a Potter 19 and a Boston Whaler Harpoon. I ve done the Texas 200 twice in
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 11, 2010
      I know a couple of you, but for the rest, I have been lurking here for some time-sail a Potter 19 and a Boston Whaler Harpoon. I've done the Texas 200 twice in the P19 and have been exposed to a lot of Michalak designs on those trips and have decided that I need to build a Mayfly 14. Not necessarily to do that trip with, but something that will sail in shallow water that doesn't take 45 minutes to rig. I will use epoxy to glue the boat up, but can't afford to epoxy/fiberglass the bottom.

      This boat will be beached on fine oyster shell a fair amount and I am worried about depending on oil based Glidden Porch and Floor to protect the bottom (although it has held up on the P19 rudder I built last year and it does cure quite hard).

      A buddy of mine has me thinking about adding a couple of sacrificial strips (keels?) on the bottom to help protect the bottom when beaching. These would terminate at the stern in skegs for better directional control when rowing. Anybody see any potential pitfalls to this?

      Thanks

      Chuck P
    • jhargrovewright2@juno.com
      Chuck,Just paint it again when you get home. More paint is good. Hard to have too many coats. JIB ... From: CHARLES To:
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 11, 2010
        Chuck,Just paint it again when you get home. More paint is good. Hard to have too many coats.
        JIB
        ---------- Original Message ----------
        From: "CHARLES" <chuckpierce@...>
        To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Michalak] A couple of questions for you guys from a newbie-
        Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2010 23:08:38 -0000


        <!--CTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dt--><p><span style="display: none;"> </span></p> <!--~-|**|PrettyHtmlStartT|**|-~--><div id="ygrp-mlmsg" style="position: relative;"><div id="ygrp-msg" style="z-index: 1;"><!--~-|**|PrettyHtmlEndT|**|-~--><div id="ygrp-text"><p>I know a couple of you, but for the rest, I have been lurking here for some time-sail a Potter 19 and a Boston Whaler Harpoon. I've done the Texas 200 twice in the P19 and have been exposed to a lot of Michalak designs on those trips and have decided that I need to build a Mayfly 14. Not necessarily to do that trip with, but something that will sail in shallow water that doesn't take 45 minutes to rig. I will use epoxy to glue the boat up, but can't afford to epoxy/fiberglass the bottom. <br><br>This boat will be beached on fine oyster shell a fair amount and I am worried about depending on oil based Glidden Porch and Floor to protect the bottom (although it has held up on the P19 rudder I built last year and it does cure quite hard). <br><br>A buddy of mine has me thinking about adding a couple of sacrificial strips (keels?) on the bottom to help protect the bottom when beaching. These would terminate at the stern in skegs for better directional control when rowing. Anybody see any potential pitfalls to this?<br><br>Thanks<br><br>Chuck P<br><br></p></div><!--~-|**|PrettyHtmlStart|**|-~--><div style="color: #fff; height: 0;"></div><!--~-|**|PrettyHtmlEnd|**|-~--><!--~-|**|PrettyHtmlStart|**|-~--><!--~-|**|PrettyHtmlEnd|**|-~--><!-- end group email --></html>

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Mark Albanese
        Yacht stuff two part polyurethanes are widly recognized as pretty tough, but spends more than for epoxy on a Mayfly. The desperate still turn to that $40
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 11, 2010
          Yacht stuff two part polyurethanes are widly recognized as pretty
          tough, but spends more than for epoxy on a Mayfly. The desperate
          still turn to that $40 gallon of polyester. It will outlast your
          effort by quite a lot.

          A pair of inch and a half thick skids will absorb much of the weight
          beached, and possibly help both sail and rowing. Twin skegs are
          redundant. A single, about the shape derived at the stern on the
          plans -in line with the transom and the bottom datum- was common on
          this type of boat some years ago.

          Do both and you'll have one tough customer. Or just make it disposable!
          Mark




          On Nov 11, 2010, at 3:08 PM, CHARLES wrote:

          > I know a couple of you, but for the rest, I have been lurking here
          > for some time-sail a Potter 19 and a Boston Whaler Harpoon. I've
          > done the Texas 200 twice in the P19 and have been exposed to a lot
          > of Michalak designs on those trips and have decided that I need to
          > build a Mayfly 14. Not necessarily to do that trip with, but
          > something that will sail in shallow water that doesn't take 45
          > minutes to rig. I will use epoxy to glue the boat up, but can't
          > afford to epoxy/fiberglass the bottom.
          >
          > This boat will be beached on fine oyster shell a fair amount and I
          > am worried about depending on oil based Glidden Porch and Floor to
          > protect the bottom (although it has held up on the P19 rudder I
          > built last year and it does cure quite hard).
          >
          > A buddy of mine has me thinking about adding a couple of
          > sacrificial strips (keels?) on the bottom to help protect the
          > bottom when beaching. These would terminate at the stern in skegs
          > for better directional control when rowing. Anybody see any
          > potential pitfalls to this?
          >
          > Thanks
          >
          > Chuck P
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • KEN
          fiberglasssite.com probably the cheepest freshest resin and cloth. tips I ve picked up, thin the resin for 1st coat with acetone to penetrate into the wood,
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 12, 2010
            fiberglasssite.com probably the cheepest freshest resin and cloth.
            tips I've picked up, thin the resin for 1st coat with acetone to penetrate into the wood, then resin-squeegee on some 6-8 oz cloth, then a couple squeegeed smoothing coats, sand and paint, should be a really tough skin.

            idk about desperate for using polyester, its pretty tough done right :)

            --- On Thu, 11/11/10, Mark Albanese <marka97203@...> wrote:

            > From: Mark Albanese <marka97203@...>
            > Subject: [Michalak] Re: A couple of questions for you guys from a newbie-
            > To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Thursday, November 11, 2010, 9:19 PM
            > Yacht stuff two part polyurethanes
            > are widly recognized as pretty 
            > tough, but spends more than for epoxy on a Mayfly. The
            > desperate 
            > still turn to that  $40 gallon of polyester. It will
            > outlast your 
            > effort by quite a lot.
            >
            > A pair of inch and a half thick skids will absorb much of
            > the weight 
            > beached, and possibly help both sail and rowing. Twin skegs
            > are 
            > redundant. A single, about the shape derived at the stern
            > on the 
            > plans  -in line with the transom and the bottom
            > datum-  was common on 
            > this type of boat some years ago.
            >
            > Do both and you'll have one tough customer. Or just make it
            > disposable!
            > Mark
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > On Nov 11, 2010, at 3:08 PM, CHARLES wrote:
            >
            > > I know a couple of you, but for the rest, I have been
            > lurking here 
            > > for some time-sail a Potter 19 and a Boston Whaler
            > Harpoon. I've 
            > > done the Texas 200 twice in the P19 and have been
            > exposed to a lot 
            > > of Michalak designs on those trips and have decided
            > that I need to 
            > > build a Mayfly 14. Not necessarily to do that trip
            > with, but 
            > > something that will sail in shallow water that doesn't
            > take 45 
            > > minutes to rig. I will use epoxy to glue the boat up,
            > but can't 
            > > afford to epoxy/fiberglass the bottom.
            > >
            > > This boat will be beached on fine oyster shell a fair
            > amount and I 
            > > am worried about depending on oil based Glidden Porch
            > and Floor to 
            > > protect the bottom (although it has held up on the P19
            > rudder I 
            > > built last year and it does cure quite hard).
            > >
            > > A buddy of mine has me thinking about adding a couple
            > of 
            > > sacrificial strips (keels?) on the bottom to help
            > protect the 
            > > bottom when beaching. These would terminate at the
            > stern in skegs 
            > > for better directional control when rowing. Anybody
            > see any 
            > > potential pitfalls to this?
            > >
            > > Thanks
            > >
            > > Chuck P
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >     Michalak-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
          • Mark Albanese
            Ken, It s generally agreed that epoxy has better peel strength, abrasion resistance and shelf life than polyester. You re correct that poly can be quite good
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 12, 2010
              Ken,

              It's generally agreed that epoxy has better peel strength, abrasion
              resistance and shelf life than polyester. You're correct that poly
              can be quite good enough, though. Perhaps the right word is frugal.

              Prices vary, and there are at least three types of polyester resin.
              fiberglasssite looks good.

              On a small project, it's worth considering the difference between
              polyester and epoxy can shrink to the price of a good sandwich by the
              time we add the fabric itself, the little accessories, thinner and
              sand paper.

              I had a polyester covered bottom, treated very poorly that lasted
              15 years before starting to peel off. I'm with you. But I'm cheap.
              Mark

              On Nov 12, 2010, at 11:32 AM, KEN wrote:
              >
              > idk about desperate for using polyester, its pretty tough done
              > right :)
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Hajo Smulders
              You can get, cheap generic epoxies for about $40-$50 per gallon through different distributors. (I buy by the 3 or 6 gallons at a time. The stuff does not
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 12, 2010
                You can get, cheap generic epoxies for about $40-$50 per gallon through
                different distributors. (I buy by the 3 or 6 gallons at a time. The stuff
                does not really have a short shelf life).
                The cheapest polyester I have found is about $35 a gallon. For an average of
                about $10 per gallon more I'm sticking with epoxy.
                I would only use polyester nowadays if I needed the quick cure. (Say if I
                wanted to build a boat on a beach, race it for a few days and then burn it;
                but who the hell would be crazy enough to do something like that?!?)

                Hajo
                --
                "The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the
                filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of
                animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps!" (E.
                Roosevelt)


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Mark Albanese
                Nobody we know!
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 12, 2010
                  Nobody we know!

                  > I would only use polyester nowadays if I needed the quick cure.
                  > (Say if I
                  > wanted to build a boat on a beach, race it for a few days and then
                  > burn it;
                  > but who the hell would be crazy enough to do something like that?!?)
                  >
                  >
                • Bill Howard
                  Sounds like you want to build a Bolger June Bug. Good boat, particularly if you use the Michalak kick up rudder, as I did on mine. No fiberglass on bottom
                  Message 8 of 9 , Dec 3, 2010
                    Sounds like you want to build a Bolger June Bug. Good boat, particularly if
                    you use the Michalak kick up rudder, as I did on mine. No fiberglass on
                    bottom except on chines, and three 1x2 stringers on the bottom.

                    enjoy!

                    Bill Howard
                    Nellysford VA

                    On Thu, Nov 11, 2010 at 6:08 PM, CHARLES <chuckpierce@...> wrote:

                    >
                    >
                    > I know a couple of you, but for the rest, I have been lurking here for some
                    > time-sail a Potter 19 and a Boston Whaler Harpoon. I've done the Texas 200
                    > twice in the P19 and have been exposed to a lot of Michalak designs on those
                    > trips and have decided that I need to build a Mayfly 14. Not necessarily to
                    > do that trip with, but something that will sail in shallow water that
                    > doesn't take 45 minutes to rig. I will use epoxy to glue the boat up, but
                    > can't afford to epoxy/fiberglass the bottom.
                    >
                    > This boat will be beached on fine oyster shell a fair amount and I am
                    > worried about depending on oil based Glidden Porch and Floor to protect the
                    > bottom (although it has held up on the P19 rudder I built last year and it
                    > does cure quite hard).
                    >
                    > A buddy of mine has me thinking about adding a couple of sacrificial strips
                    > (keels?) on the bottom to help protect the bottom when beaching. These would
                    > terminate at the stern in skegs for better directional control when rowing.
                    > Anybody see any potential pitfalls to this?
                    >
                    > Thanks
                    >
                    > Chuck P
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • tsgosnell
                    I love my mayfly 14. I glassed and graphited the bottom, no skeg. I do however think your idea about the bottom runners will work just fine, I have another
                    Message 9 of 9 , Dec 3, 2010
                      I love my mayfly 14. I glassed and graphited the bottom, no skeg. I do however think your idea about the bottom runners will work just fine, I have another small boat built with the runners on the bottom, no glass, and it has held up well. Mayflys a great boat!
                      Scott

                      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Bill Howard <billh39@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Sounds like you want to build a Bolger June Bug. Good boat, particularly if
                      > you use the Michalak kick up rudder, as I did on mine. No fiberglass on
                      > bottom except on chines, and three 1x2 stringers on the bottom.
                      >
                      > enjoy!
                      >
                      > Bill Howard
                      > Nellysford VA
                      >
                      > On Thu, Nov 11, 2010 at 6:08 PM, CHARLES <chuckpierce@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > I know a couple of you, but for the rest, I have been lurking here for some
                      > > time-sail a Potter 19 and a Boston Whaler Harpoon. I've done the Texas 200
                      > > twice in the P19 and have been exposed to a lot of Michalak designs on those
                      > > trips and have decided that I need to build a Mayfly 14. Not necessarily to
                      > > do that trip with, but something that will sail in shallow water that
                      > > doesn't take 45 minutes to rig. I will use epoxy to glue the boat up, but
                      > > can't afford to epoxy/fiberglass the bottom.
                      > >
                      > > This boat will be beached on fine oyster shell a fair amount and I am
                      > > worried about depending on oil based Glidden Porch and Floor to protect the
                      > > bottom (although it has held up on the P19 rudder I built last year and it
                      > > does cure quite hard).
                      > >
                      > > A buddy of mine has me thinking about adding a couple of sacrificial strips
                      > > (keels?) on the bottom to help protect the bottom when beaching. These would
                      > > terminate at the stern in skegs for better directional control when rowing.
                      > > Anybody see any potential pitfalls to this?
                      > >
                      > > Thanks
                      > >
                      > > Chuck P
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
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