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Re: [Michalak] Re: Getting a smooth surface to epoxy finish.

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  • Andres Espino
    One coat to encapsulate the wood is enough, but if you are forced to sand half of it off to smooth it then you end up doing several coats.  I think most
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 5, 2010
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      One coat to encapsulate the wood is enough, but if you are forced to sand half of it off to smooth it then you end up doing several coats.  I think most people use thickener which is what we must add to make fillets in stitch and glue boats.  As I read about it... seems you only add a small amount to reduce runs.

      Andrew


      --- On Tue, 10/5/10, prairiedog2332 <nelsarv@...> wrote:

      From: prairiedog2332 <nelsarv@...>
      Subject: [Michalak] Re: Getting a smooth surface to epoxy finish.
      To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, October 5, 2010, 2:26 PM







       









      You can add a thickener to the 2nd and 3rd applications to lessen runs

      and sags.



      http://www.duckworksbbs.com/supplies/additives/silica/index.htm



      Also they can be scraped off smooth with a scraper when the epoxy is at

      the green stage, rather than having to sand.



      What are the supposed advantages of applying several coats of epoxy over

      plywood anyway if you are painting with a waterproof paint?



      Nels



      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Hajo Smulders <hajosmulders@...> wrote:

      >

      > Epoxy runs for hours after applying. You can watch like a hawk and run

      your

      > brush regularly over the work till it gums up (I don't recommend

      this); OR

      > use a squeegie. I apply with a brush and then squeegie over it. It

      gets rid

      > of quite a bit of epoxy (Lighter!) and keeps that excess epoxy from

      running.

      > I use the pink body work squeegies one can buy at automotive

      do-it-yourself

      > stores.

      >

      >

      > Hajo

      > --

      > "People [are] being persuaded to spend money we don't have, on things

      we

      > don't need, to create impressions that won't last, on people we don't

      care

      > about." (Tim Jackson)

      >

      >

      > On Tue, Oct 5, 2010 at 12:44 PM, can14riv kirkerpoint@... wrote:

      >

      > >

      > >

      > > Building a small rowboat at the present I am applying epoxy coatings

      to the

      > > hull,but experiencing runs in the finish which is sanded out.

      > >

      > > I have applied two coats of epoxy to the hull, sanding the runs

      between

      > > coats. It maybe I am simply trying to apply too thick a coat at one

      time,

      > > however, it seems like sanding removes what I just put on( I am not

      sanding

      > > to the point of going into the wood there still epoxy covered wood).

      My goal

      > > in this project is three coats of epoxy then paint the hull. The

      requirement

      > > for the final coat of epoxy may not be as critical as that for a

      bright

      > > finish. I tried using foam and cheap bristle bushes for application.

      There

      > > must be a better technique to apply epoxy ( than what I am doing) to

      > > minimize sanding. Bob

      > >

      >

      >

      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      >

























      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • gary
      Bob: What epoxy are you using? I frequently use an inexpensive epoxy from Fiberglass Coatings Inc (www.fgci.com) that s pretty thick, even without fillers.
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 5, 2010
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        Bob:
        What epoxy are you using? I frequently use an inexpensive epoxy from Fiberglass Coatings Inc (www.fgci.com) that's pretty thick, even without fillers. When I paint it on a vertical surface, it always runs. Currently I'm using some epoxy from Duckworks and some MAS epoxy that I picked up on sale. With some care in application, I've not had any problems with either running, which simplifies finishing a lot. both are thinner than the FGCI stuff. Likewise WEST is an even thinner epoxy and I've no problems with it running. depending on the finish you want, it might be worth more to pay a little extra for thinner epoxy.

        Thinning thick epoxy with rubbing alcohol or acetone can help, but too much thinner could after the waterproofness of the coating.

        Gary

        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "can14riv" <kirkerpoint@...> wrote:
        >
        > Building a small rowboat at the present I am applying epoxy coatings to the hull,but experiencing runs in the finish which is sanded out.
        >
        > I have applied two coats of epoxy to the hull, sanding the runs between coats. It maybe I am simply trying to apply too thick a coat at one time, however, it seems like sanding removes what I just put on( I am not sanding to the point of going into the wood there still epoxy covered wood). My goal in this project is three coats of epoxy then paint the hull. The requirement for the final coat of epoxy may not be as critical as that for a bright finish. I tried using foam and cheap bristle bushes for application. There must be a better technique to apply epoxy ( than what I am doing) to minimize sanding. Bob
        >
      • prairiedog2332
        I think also if the hull is small enough you can tilt it so that you are applying the epoxy on a more level surface. Some builders recommend applying it to the
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 5, 2010
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          I think also if the hull is small enough you can tilt it so that you are
          applying the epoxy on a more level surface. Some builders recommend
          applying it to the flat parts prior to assembly. The epoxy essentially
          becomes the sealer prior to painting.

          Nels


          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Andres Espino
          <ima_very_cool_cowboy@...> wrote:
          >
          > One coat to encapsulate the wood is enough, but if you are forced to
          sand half of it off to smooth it then you end up doing several
          coats. I think most people use thickener which is what we must add
          to make fillets in stitch and glue boats. As I read about it...
          seems you only add a small amount to reduce runs.
          >
          > Andrew
          >
          >
          > --- On Tue, 10/5/10, prairiedog2332 nelsarv@... wrote:
          >
          > From: prairiedog2332 nelsarv@...
          > Subject: [Michalak] Re: Getting a smooth surface to epoxy finish.
          > To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Tuesday, October 5, 2010, 2:26 PM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Â
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > You can add a thickener to the 2nd and 3rd applications to
          lessen runs
          >
          > and sags.
          >
          >
          >
          > http://www.duckworksbbs.com/supplies/additives/silica/index.htm
          >
          >
          >
          > Also they can be scraped off smooth with a scraper when the epoxy is
          at
          >
          > the green stage, rather than having to sand.
          >
          >
          >
          > What are the supposed advantages of applying several coats of epoxy
          over
          >
          > plywood anyway if you are painting with a waterproof paint?
          >
          >
          >
          > Nels
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Hajo Smulders hajosmulders@ wrote:
          >
          > >
          >
          > > Epoxy runs for hours after applying. You can watch like a hawk and
          run
          >
          > your
          >
          > > brush regularly over the work till it gums up (I don't recommend
          >
          > this); OR
          >
          > > use a squeegie. I apply with a brush and then squeegie over it. It
          >
          > gets rid
          >
          > > of quite a bit of epoxy (Lighter!) and keeps that excess epoxy from
          >
          > running.
          >
          > > I use the pink body work squeegies one can buy at automotive
          >
          > do-it-yourself
          >
          > > stores.
          >
          > >
          >
          > >
          >
          > > Hajo
          >
          > > --
          >
          > > "People [are] being persuaded to spend money we don't have, on
          things
          >
          > we
          >
          > > don't need, to create impressions that won't last, on people we
          don't
          >
          > care
          >
          > > about." (Tim Jackson)
          >
          > >
          >
          > >
          >
          > > On Tue, Oct 5, 2010 at 12:44 PM, can14riv kirkerpoint@ wrote:
          >
          > >
          >
          > > >
          >
          > > >
          >
          > > > Building a small rowboat at the present I am applying epoxy
          coatings
          >
          > to the
          >
          > > > hull,but experiencing runs in the finish which is sanded out.
          >
          > > >
          >
          > > > I have applied two coats of epoxy to the hull, sanding the runs
          >
          > between
          >
          > > > coats. It maybe I am simply trying to apply too thick a coat at
          one
          >
          > time,
          >
          > > > however, it seems like sanding removes what I just put on( I am
          not
          >
          > sanding
          >
          > > > to the point of going into the wood there still epoxy covered
          wood).
          >
          > My goal
          >
          > > > in this project is three coats of epoxy then paint the hull. The
          >
          > requirement
          >
          > > > for the final coat of epoxy may not be as critical as that for a
          >
          > bright
          >
          > > > finish. I tried using foam and cheap bristle bushes for
          application.
          >
          > There
          >
          > > > must be a better technique to apply epoxy ( than what I am doing)
          to
          >
          > > > minimize sanding. Bob
          >
          > > >
          >
          > >
          >
          > >
          >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • David Calloway
          Hi Bob, I use silica thickener for vertical surfaces. Just a little helps a great deal. Dave ... From: can14riv [mailto:kirkerpoint@yahoo.com] Sent: Tuesday,
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 5, 2010
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            Hi Bob,

            I use silica thickener for vertical surfaces. Just a little helps a great deal.

            Dave

            -----Original Message-----
            From: can14riv [mailto:kirkerpoint@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, October 5, 2010 09:44 AM
            To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Michalak] Getting a smooth surface to epoxy finish.

            Building a small rowboat at the present I am applying epoxy coatings to the hull,but experiencing runs in the finish which is sanded out.

            I have applied two coats of epoxy to the hull, sanding the runs between coats. It maybe I am simply trying to apply too thick a coat at one time, however, it seems like sanding removes what I just put on( I am not sanding to the point of going into the wood there still epoxy covered wood). My goal in this project is three coats of epoxy then paint the hull. The requirement for the final coat of epoxy may not be as critical as that for a bright finish. I tried using foam and cheap bristle bushes for application. There must be a better technique to apply epoxy ( than what I am doing) to minimize sanding. Bob







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Dave Gentry
            You can very easily get to the painting portion by not applying any more epoxy. To apply another coat is to needlessly add time, effort, weight and expense to
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 6, 2010
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              You can very easily get to the painting portion by not applying any more epoxy. To apply another coat is to needlessly add time, effort, weight and expense to your project.

              Otherwise:
              Use a scraper on drips and runs, which will minimize sanding.
              You can also try "peel ply" for an ultra smooth finish, assuming you do it right. Here's a link to the process: http://www.clcboats.com/shoptips/epoxy_and_fiberglass/peel-ply-release-fabric.html

              There is also some good advice in the answers you have already been given. And some that is suspect. Caveat Emptor!

              Good luck!
              Dave Gentry
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