Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

copper green

Expand Messages
  • John Huft
    Has anybody every tried copper or zink wood preservatives on their boat. Has anybody ever tried it under epoxy? Thanks, John Boy [Non-text portions of this
    Message 1 of 21 , Dec 6, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Has anybody every tried copper or zink wood preservatives on their boat. Has anybody ever tried it under epoxy?
      Thanks,
      John Boy





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • nichollstown
      I grew up using the green Cuprinol stuff on commercial fishing boats. It worked very well, but was not very compatable with Polyester or Epoxy, from what I
      Message 2 of 21 , Dec 6, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        I grew up using the green Cuprinol stuff on commercial fishing boats. It worked very well, but was not very compatable with Polyester or Epoxy, from what I remember. I do remember that it was not as good as Red Lead or Tar for isolating mating pieces of wood, like rib faces or chine logs. It really would be of little advantage on plywood, as the glue would only allow it to penetrate on layer of ply.

        Regards
        Don Carson

        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, John Huft <t1ro2003@...> wrote:
        >
        > Has anybody every tried copper or zink wood preservatives on their boat. Has anybody ever tried it under epoxy?
        > Thanks,
        > John Boy
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • jhargrovewright2
        Cuprinol is nasty dangerous stuff.... if it is still available? Don t touch smell it, drip it, or even get close enough to see it.. Ultimate bad stuff.
        Message 3 of 21 , Dec 6, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Cuprinol is nasty dangerous stuff.... if it is still available? Don't
          touch smell it, drip it, or even get close enough to see it.. Ultimate
          bad stuff. Disclaimer... I am not careful about protection from all the
          many chemicals, and I have many.. Cuprinol is super bad...or a lot worse
          than that. But, it was the only thing to keep expensive shrimp nets
          (when made of cotton cord) from rotting in just couple of months.
          johninbastrop

          On Sun, 06 Dec 2009 14:35:20 -0000 "nichollstown"
          <nichollstown@...> writes:

          I grew up using the green Cuprinol stuff on commercial fishing boats. It
          worked very well, but was not very compatable with Polyester or Epoxy,
          from what I remember. I do remember that it was not as good as Red Lead
          or Tar for isolating mating pieces of wood, like rib faces or chine logs.
          It really would be of little advantage on plywood, as the glue would only
          allow it to penetrate on layer of ply.

          Regards
          Don Carson

          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, John Huft <t1ro2003@...> wrote:
          >
          > Has anybody every tried copper or zink wood preservatives on their
          boat. Has anybody ever tried it under epoxy?
          > Thanks,
          > John Boy
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >



          ____________________________________________________________
          Diet Help
          Cheap Diet Help Tips. Click here.
          http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2141/c?cp=CIN3gjjcui84O7j75IEozwAAJ1A6Dj4GjgZ5WZ8EehT9sL1JAAYAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAADNAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAYQAAAAAA=

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • mocap1
          I have a small schooner that has developed soft spots in its painted pine deck. I have dug them out, poured in Cuprinol, filled them with Bondo, and then
          Message 4 of 21 , Dec 7, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            I have a small schooner that has developed soft spots in its painted pine deck. I have dug them out, poured in Cuprinol, filled them with Bondo, and then painted over them, at the suggestion of an experienced Nova Scotia boat builder who owns the boatyard and marina where I keep the boat. I have been doing this for several years, and it seems to work fine. I have noticed that when I pour in the Cuprinol it seeps into the wood considerably beyond the holes I have made; no doubt a good thing.

            I have also used Cuprinol on various outdoor projects around home, such as under planks laminated with nails but not glue on to plywood to make large doors. They have stood out in the weather for about ten years now and there is no sign of rot.

            Mort

            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, John Huft <t1ro2003@...> wrote:
            >
            > Has anybody every tried copper or zink wood preservatives on their boat. Has anybody ever tried it under epoxy?
            > Thanks,
            > John Boy
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Douglas Pollard
            In My opinion you are making a mistake. It will work to some degree to slow rot. The problem is that at some point you will have a boat that has enough filled
            Message 5 of 21 , Dec 7, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              In My opinion you are making a mistake. It will work to some degree to
              slow rot. The problem is that at some point you will have a boat that
              has enough filled places in it that it will be easier to burn it and
              build a new boat than repair it. IF you have a bad spot in a plank pull
              it out and replace it. It is not that hard! What you are doing is ok for
              a temporary fix until the sailing season is over. During the winter you
              can replace the plank. If you don't have shelter to work in then do it
              in the spring. Git Rot, coprenol and filling a hole with epoxy are at
              best a very temporary fix. IF I have a rotten spot it has always been my
              practice to replace the plank at the same time I also replace the plank
              next to it at the same time. Most likely the rot has spread to nearby
              planks as well. At the same time don't fix the plank with a shorter
              piece because at some point you will have a weakened boat full of short
              planks and that is only slightly better than a rotten one. The rot in
              the plank may have dripped all over the frame under it now while the
              frame is still solid scrape off the paint and saturate it with coprenol.
              Before the rot starts is the time to use copper. If the rotted space is
              leaking inside, the water is likely to have run downhill on the under
              side of the plank to the nearest frame. That may be the place to use
              cuprinol. If there are a lot of rotten spots on deck you may have to
              forget it the boat may well be too far gone with rot working in all her
              framing. She may even look sound. Rot is like the Flu the damage is done
              before the fever starts. Cracking and peeling paint are usually the
              first signs.
              Doug




              mocap1 wrote:
              >
              > I have a small schooner that has developed soft spots in its painted
              > pine deck. I have dug them out, poured in Cuprinol, filled them with
              > Bondo, and then painted over them, at the suggestion of an experienced
              > Nova Scotia boat builder who owns the boatyard and marina where I keep
              > the boat. I have been doing this for several years, and it seems to
              > work fine. I have noticed that when I pour in the Cuprinol it seeps
              > into the wood considerably beyond the holes I have made; no doubt a
              > good thing.
              >
              > I have also used Cuprinol on various outdoor projects around home,
              > such as under planks laminated with nails but not glue on to plywood
              > to make large doors. They have stood out in the weather for about ten
              > years now and there is no sign of rot.
              >
              > Mort
              >
              > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Michalak%40yahoogroups.com>,
              > John Huft <t1ro2003@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Has anybody every tried copper or zink wood preservatives on their
              > boat. Has anybody ever tried it under epoxy?
              > > Thanks,
              > > John Boy
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              >
            • Nels A
              Hi Mort, How small is your schooner? Would love to see a photo or two, so feel free to post some. This group is not ALL about Michalak designs. Thanks also
              Message 6 of 21 , Dec 7, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Mort,

                How "small" is your schooner? Would love to see a photo or two, so feel
                free to post some. This group is not ALL about Michalak designs.

                Thanks also for sharing your experience.

                Nels

                --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "mocap1" <mocap1@...> wrote:
                >
                > I have a small schooner that has developed soft spots in its painted
                pine deck. I have dug them out, poured in Cuprinol, filled them with
                Bondo, and then painted over them, at the suggestion of an experienced
                Nova Scotia boat builder who owns the boatyard and marina where I keep
                the boat. I have been doing this for several years, and it seems to work
                fine. I have noticed that when I pour in the Cuprinol it seeps into the
                wood considerably beyond the holes I have made; no doubt a good thing.
                >
                > I have also used Cuprinol on various outdoor projects around home,
                such as under planks laminated with nails but not glue on to plywood to
                make large doors. They have stood out in the weather for about ten years
                now and there is no sign of rot.
                >
                > Mort
                >
                > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, John Huft t1ro2003@ wrote:
                > >
                > > Has anybody every tried copper or zink wood preservatives on their
                boat. Has anybody ever tried it under epoxy?
                > > Thanks,
                > > John Boy
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                >
              • Nels A
                I built a new cradle for my Micro using pressure treated wood and Plywood and used cuprinol to impregnate all the cut edges. I agree both products are very
                Message 7 of 21 , Dec 7, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  I built a new cradle for my Micro using pressure treated wood and
                  Plywood and used cuprinol to impregnate all the cut edges.

                  I agree both products are very dangerous and require a good mask.

                  Not a chance I would use it again though, or on a boat.

                  Same goes for creosote.

                  Nels


                  --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Douglas Pollard <dougpol1@...> wrote:
                  >
                • nichollstown
                  If you want a real preservative, that is cheap and has been proven for centuries, try pine tar oil. I have used this stuff my whole life and have alway found
                  Message 8 of 21 , Dec 7, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    If you want a real preservative, that is cheap and has been proven for centuries, try pine tar oil. I have used this stuff my whole life and have alway found it to really protect, seal, and have a really nice smell. It is what used to be known as "Stockholm tar" on the square riggers. Great for slushing on interiors of boats, to prevent rot. Not bad for you, as they make soap out of it. It turns a pleasing gray color if it is left to weather for years, like an old lobster trap. And yes, it works on plywood like a dream. You can get it cheap at:

                    http://www.solventfreepaint.com/pine-tar.htm

                    I regularly treat the hull of my 1928 trawler with pine tar oil, as did her past owners, which is why she is 81 years old,has no rot, and smells fresh inside.

                    Don


                    --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Nels A" <arvent@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I built a new cradle for my Micro using pressure treated wood and
                    > Plywood and used cuprinol to impregnate all the cut edges.
                    >
                    > I agree both products are very dangerous and require a good mask.
                    >
                    > Not a chance I would use it again though, or on a boat.
                    >
                    > Same goes for creosote.
                    >
                    > Nels
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Douglas Pollard <dougpol1@> wrote:
                    > >
                    >
                  • Nels A
                    Hi Don. Any photos of your trawler? I have to agree that is great stuff - as is the Falun Red Exterior paint - having recently visited Sweden and Norway - and
                    Message 9 of 21 , Dec 7, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Hi Don.

                      Any photos of your trawler?

                      I have to agree that is great stuff - as is the Falun Red Exterior paint
                      - having recently visited Sweden and Norway - and saw countless examples
                      of houses and boats that are over 100 years old in which both products
                      were used.

                      Not very easy to obtain - where I live at least - in Canada. Does the
                      price include shipping? I tried to order some and they only accept pay
                      pal which I do not have.

                      I read in WB magazine the European Union were taking steps to ban its
                      import to other countries. Why - I don't know.

                      How often do you treat your boat?

                      I am also interested in what Norwegians use on their bright finished
                      hulls?

                      Nels



                      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "nichollstown" <nichollstown@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > If you want a real preservative, that is cheap and has been proven for
                      centuries, try pine tar oil. I have used this stuff my whole life and
                      have alway found it to really protect, seal, and have a really nice
                      smell. It is what used to be known as "Stockholm tar" on the square
                      riggers. Great for slushing on interiors of boats, to prevent rot.
                      Not bad for you, as they make soap out of it. It turns a pleasing gray
                      color if it is left to weather for years, like an old lobster trap. And
                      yes, it works on plywood like a dream. You can get it cheap at:
                      >
                      > http://www.solventfreepaint.com/pine-tar.htm
                      >
                      > I regularly treat the hull of my 1928 trawler with pine tar oil, as
                      did her past owners, which is why she is 81 years old,has no rot, and
                      smells fresh inside.
                      >
                      > Don
                      >
                    • John Huft
                      I like the sound (smell) of this idea, especially since I live in an area where forest products are a big business. Around here old pine stumps are called
                      Message 10 of 21 , Dec 7, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I like the sound (smell) of this idea, especially since I live in an area where forest products are a big business. Around here old pine stumps are called "fat lighter" because of all the pine tar in them and because slivers of it are great for starting fires. In fact, I live in an old house made of first growth pine. The one downside is that it'll burn like the Fires of Hades but on the plus side, you will be warm while the fire roars.
                        John Boy




                        ________________________________
                        From: nichollstown <nichollstown@...>
                        To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Mon, December 7, 2009 2:51:02 PM
                        Subject: [Michalak] Re: copper green


                        If you want a real preservative, that is cheap and has been proven for centuries, try pine tar oil. I have used this stuff my whole life and have alway found it to really protect, seal, and have a really nice smell. It is what used to be known as "Stockholm tar" on the square riggers. Great for slushing on interiors of boats, to prevent rot. Not bad for you, as they make soap out of it. It turns a pleasing gray color if it is left to weather for years, like an old lobster trap. And yes, it works on plywood like a dream. You can get it cheap at:

                        http://www.solventf reepaint. com/pine- tar.htm

                        I regularly treat the hull of my 1928 trawler with pine tar oil, as did her past owners, which is why she is 81 years old,has no rot, and smells fresh inside.

                        Don

                        --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, "Nels A" <arvent@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I built a new cradle for my Micro using pressure treated wood and
                        > Plywood and used cuprinol to impregnate all the cut edges.
                        >
                        > I agree both products are very dangerous and require a good mask.
                        >
                        > Not a chance I would use it again though, or on a boat.
                        >
                        > Same goes for creosote.
                        >
                        > Nels
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, Douglas Pollard <dougpol1@> wrote:
                        > >
                        >







                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • nichollstown
                        Nels and John I will post a pic of th,e old trawler, tomorrow, all my good ones are in my office oomputer, She was actually built by a Norweigan in Seattle
                        Message 11 of 21 , Dec 7, 2009
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Nels and John

                          I will post a pic of th,e old trawler, tomorrow, all my good ones are in my office oomputer, She was actually built by a Norweigan in Seattle Washington in 1928. I am sure those first generation immigrants continued to do things like they did in Norway, when they came to the U.S. The hull is planked in 2" Alaskan yellow cedar, which still looks new, when I drilled for a through hull, last year.

                          I re-tar about once a year, or less, depending on how hard I use her. Since she still occasionally works for a living, some years I re-tar 2 or 3 times. Inside the hull is all unpainted, just a bit of varnish , and the rest is tar/linseed oil. The smell is fantastic, and gives an authentic aroma to match the ol' salt looks. I am a staunch believer in allowing the interior wood to breathe. The tar finish allows the wood to breath while waterproofing the wood.

                          If you have the pine stumps available, it is not hard to make the tar yourself. Essentially you put the wood in a big can with a lid, and a drain tube out the bottom, and build a fire around the can. The wood gets hot and oozes the tar out, which drips to the bottm and out the tube to a collection container. We made some, years ago, in the Bahamas, using an old pressure cooker. The forrests there are loaded with old growth long leaf yellow pine, lots of resin!!!

                          For longevity in a non-epoxy coated hull, I would rate pine tar and red lead as tops for preventing rot.

                          Another product I use alot is Elastomeric Roof Sealer, which is a white, thick, latex type glop, which people in the south use to seal roofs on houses and mobile homes. Its about $15 a gal at home depot.
                          It is not good for using inside the hull below the waterline, but it is fantastic on decks and cabins. It totally seals and waterproofs the wood, and can be painted over with enamal or latex paint. I have fixed alot of leaky decks and cabin tops with this stuff. It is also a good bedding compound for above the waterline stuff.

                          Its amazing what you can use in place of expensive "Marine stuff", heck I use plain old oil based Rustoleum to paint ($6 a quart) to paint most of my boats, it lasts for years and does not crack!

                          Don Carson

                          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Nels A" <arvent@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi Don.
                          >
                          > Any photos of your trawler?
                          >
                          > I have to agree that is great stuff - as is the Falun Red Exterior paint
                          > - having recently visited Sweden and Norway - and saw countless examples
                          > of houses and boats that are over 100 years old in which both products
                          > were used.
                          >
                          > Not very easy to obtain - where I live at least - in Canada. Does the
                          > price include shipping? I tried to order some and they only accept pay
                          > pal which I do not have.
                          >
                          > I read in WB magazine the European Union were taking steps to ban its
                          > import to other countries. Why - I don't know.
                          >
                          > How often do you treat your boat?
                          >
                          > I am also interested in what Norwegians use on their bright finished
                          > hulls?
                          >
                          > Nels
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "nichollstown" <nichollstown@>
                          > wrote:
                          > >
                          > > If you want a real preservative, that is cheap and has been proven for
                          > centuries, try pine tar oil. I have used this stuff my whole life and
                          > have alway found it to really protect, seal, and have a really nice
                          > smell. It is what used to be known as "Stockholm tar" on the square
                          > riggers. Great for slushing on interiors of boats, to prevent rot.
                          > Not bad for you, as they make soap out of it. It turns a pleasing gray
                          > color if it is left to weather for years, like an old lobster trap. And
                          > yes, it works on plywood like a dream. You can get it cheap at:
                          > >
                          > > http://www.solventfreepaint.com/pine-tar.htm
                          > >
                          > > I regularly treat the hull of my 1928 trawler with pine tar oil, as
                          > did her past owners, which is why she is 81 years old,has no rot, and
                          > smells fresh inside.
                          > >
                          > > Don
                          > >
                          >
                        • John Huft
                          Don, The Stockholm Tar website said to cut it with linseed oil to make it thin enough to spread and penetrate. How long does it take to dry and how do you
                          Message 12 of 21 , Dec 7, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Don,
                            The Stockholm Tar website said to cut it with linseed oil to make it thin enough to spread and penetrate. How long does it take to dry and how do you keep it from being tacky?

                            Living in the Red Neck Riviera like I do, I know me some Cool Seal. You said not to use Cool Seal inside below the water line. Did you mean to say outside? I would suspect that the hydraulic pressure would force water through over time.
                            Thanks,
                            John Boy


                            ________________________________
                            From: nichollstown <nichollstown@...>
                            To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Mon, December 7, 2009 5:59:36 PM
                            Subject: [Michalak] Re: copper green (Stockholm Tar)


                            Nels and John

                            I will post a pic of th,e old trawler, tomorrow, all my good ones are in my office oomputer, She was actually built by a Norweigan in Seattle Washington in 1928. I am sure those first generation immigrants continued to do things like they did in Norway, when they came to the U.S. The hull is planked in 2" Alaskan yellow cedar, which still looks new, when I drilled for a through hull, last year.

                            I re-tar about once a year, or less, depending on how hard I use her. Since she still occasionally works for a living, some years I re-tar 2 or 3 times. Inside the hull is all unpainted, just a bit of varnish , and the rest is tar/linseed oil. The smell is fantastic, and gives an authentic aroma to match the ol' salt looks. I am a staunch believer in allowing the interior wood to breathe. The tar finish allows the wood to breath while waterproofing the wood.

                            If you have the pine stumps available, it is not hard to make the tar yourself. Essentially you put the wood in a big can with a lid, and a drain tube out the bottom, and build a fire around the can. The wood gets hot and oozes the tar out, which drips to the bottm and out the tube to a collection container. We made some, years ago, in the Bahamas, using an old pressure cooker. The forrests there are loaded with old growth long leaf yellow pine, lots of resin!!!

                            For longevity in a non-epoxy coated hull, I would rate pine tar and red lead as tops for preventing rot.

                            Another product I use alot is Elastomeric Roof Sealer, which is a white, thick, latex type glop, which people in the south use to seal roofs on houses and mobile homes. Its about $15 a gal at home depot.
                            It is not good for using inside the hull below the waterline, but it is fantastic on decks and cabins. It totally seals and waterproofs the wood, and can be painted over with enamal or latex paint. I have fixed alot of leaky decks and cabin tops with this stuff. It is also a good bedding compound for above the waterline stuff.

                            Its amazing what you can use in place of expensive "Marine stuff", heck I use plain old oil based Rustoleum to paint ($6 a quart) to paint most of my boats, it lasts for years and does not crack!

                            Don Carson

                            --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, "Nels A" <arvent@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hi Don.
                            >
                            > Any photos of your trawler?
                            >
                            > I have to agree that is great stuff - as is the aintFalun Red Exterior p
                            > - having recently visited Sweden and Norway - and saw countless examples
                            > of houses and boats that are over 100 years old in which both products
                            > were used.
                            >
                            > Not very easy to obtain - where I live at least - in Canada. Does the
                            > price include shipping? I tried to order some and they only accept pay
                            > pal which I do not have.
                            >
                            > I read in WB magazine the European Union were taking steps to ban its
                            > import to other countries. Why - I don't know.
                            >
                            > How often do you treat your boat?
                            >
                            > I am also interested in what Norwegians use on their bright finished
                            > hulls?
                            >
                            > Nels
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, "nichollstown" <nichollstown@ >
                            > wrote:
                            > >
                            > > If you want a real preservative, that is cheap and has been proven for
                            > centuries, try pine tar oil. I have used this stuff my whole life and
                            > have alway found it to really protect, seal, and have a really nice
                            > smell. It is what used to be known as "Stockholm tar" on the square
                            > riggers. Great for slushing on interiors of boats, to prevent rot.
                            > Not bad for you, as they make soap out of it. It turns a pleasing gray
                            > color if it is left to weather for years, like an old lobster trap. And
                            > yes, it works on plywood like a dream. You can get it cheap at:
                            > >
                            > > http://www.solventf reepaint. com/pine- tar.htm
                            > >
                            > > I regularly treat the hull of my 1928 trawler with pine tar oil, as
                            > did her past owners, which is why she is 81 years old,has no rot, and
                            > smells fresh inside.
                            > >
                            > > Don
                            > >
                            >







                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • nichollstown
                            John If you use good grade linseed oil, it will dry and not be tacky, but it takes a week or so. Also, a pinch of Japan Drier helps. I have found that after
                            Message 13 of 21 , Dec 8, 2009
                            • 0 Attachment
                              John

                              If you use good grade linseed oil, it will dry and not be tacky, but it takes a week or so. Also, a pinch of Japan Drier helps. I have found that after several applications, I let it bake in the sun for a day or so, then give it a good rubdown with a clean rag, to get any pooled areas off. Then just let it sit for a few more days, and it will all soak in and be non-tacky. It takes patience, but it is well worth it, compared to fiddling with epoxy and such.

                              I usually pre-treat anything that is not being glued/caulked, before it is installed, that way it can be done ahead of time and dry for installation. Don't tar any area that is going to be glued or caulked, till after installation, as the tar will hinder the bond of the adhesive.

                              As far as the coolseal, I have found it does not stay put on boat bottoms, even inside, as the moisture content of the wood is too high. It is fine on the sides above the waterline, where they get occasional wetting. It is great for bedding rubrails, toerails, and cabin sides. Also great as a deck material, when put over nylon screen material (window screen). I built several houseboats out of nothing but 1/4" ply and covered it with coolseal and window screen. The last one survived 3 hurricanes, without a leak in the cabin!!!
                              I call it poor mans fiberglass, but it really is a superior way to go, as it stays flexible for decades.

                              I posted a shot of my old trawler in the photo section as "1928"

                              Don

                              --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, John Huft <t1ro2003@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Don,
                              > The Stockholm Tar website said to cut it with linseed oil to make it thin enough to spread and penetrate. How long does it take to dry and how do you keep it from being tacky?
                              >
                              > Living in the Red Neck Riviera like I do, I know me some Cool Seal. You said not to use Cool Seal inside below the water line. Did you mean to say outside? I would suspect that the hydraulic pressure would force water through over time.
                              > Thanks,
                              > John Boy
                              >
                              >
                              > ________________________________
                              > From: nichollstown <nichollstown@...>
                              > To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
                              > Sent: Mon, December 7, 2009 5:59:36 PM
                              > Subject: [Michalak] Re: copper green (Stockholm Tar)
                              >
                              >
                              > Nels and John
                              >
                              > I will post a pic of th,e old trawler, tomorrow, all my good ones are in my office oomputer, She was actually built by a Norweigan in Seattle Washington in 1928. I am sure those first generation immigrants continued to do things like they did in Norway, when they came to the U.S. The hull is planked in 2" Alaskan yellow cedar, which still looks new, when I drilled for a through hull, last year.
                              >
                              > I re-tar about once a year, or less, depending on how hard I use her. Since she still occasionally works for a living, some years I re-tar 2 or 3 times. Inside the hull is all unpainted, just a bit of varnish , and the rest is tar/linseed oil. The smell is fantastic, and gives an authentic aroma to match the ol' salt looks. I am a staunch believer in allowing the interior wood to breathe. The tar finish allows the wood to breath while waterproofing the wood.
                              >
                              > If you have the pine stumps available, it is not hard to make the tar yourself. Essentially you put the wood in a big can with a lid, and a drain tube out the bottom, and build a fire around the can. The wood gets hot and oozes the tar out, which drips to the bottm and out the tube to a collection container. We made some, years ago, in the Bahamas, using an old pressure cooker. The forrests there are loaded with old growth long leaf yellow pine, lots of resin!!!
                              >
                              > For longevity in a non-epoxy coated hull, I would rate pine tar and red lead as tops for preventing rot.
                              >
                              > Another product I use alot is Elastomeric Roof Sealer, which is a white, thick, latex type glop, which people in the south use to seal roofs on houses and mobile homes. Its about $15 a gal at home depot.
                              > It is not good for using inside the hull below the waterline, but it is fantastic on decks and cabins. It totally seals and waterproofs the wood, and can be painted over with enamal or latex paint. I have fixed alot of leaky decks and cabin tops with this stuff. It is also a good bedding compound for above the waterline stuff.
                              >
                              > Its amazing what you can use in place of expensive "Marine stuff", heck I use plain old oil based Rustoleum to paint ($6 a quart) to paint most of my boats, it lasts for years and does not crack!
                              >
                              > Don Carson
                              >
                              > --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, "Nels A" <arvent@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Hi Don.
                              > >
                              > > Any photos of your trawler?
                              > >
                              > > I have to agree that is great stuff - as is the aintFalun Red Exterior p
                              > > - having recently visited Sweden and Norway - and saw countless examples
                              > > of houses and boats that are over 100 years old in which both products
                              > > were used.
                              > >
                              > > Not very easy to obtain - where I live at least - in Canada. Does the
                              > > price include shipping? I tried to order some and they only accept pay
                              > > pal which I do not have.
                              > >
                              > > I read in WB magazine the European Union were taking steps to ban its
                              > > import to other countries. Why - I don't know.
                              > >
                              > > How often do you treat your boat?
                              > >
                              > > I am also interested in what Norwegians use on their bright finished
                              > > hulls?
                              > >
                              > > Nels
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, "nichollstown" <nichollstown@ >
                              > > wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > If you want a real preservative, that is cheap and has been proven for
                              > > centuries, try pine tar oil. I have used this stuff my whole life and
                              > > have alway found it to really protect, seal, and have a really nice
                              > > smell. It is what used to be known as "Stockholm tar" on the square
                              > > riggers. Great for slushing on interiors of boats, to prevent rot.
                              > > Not bad for you, as they make soap out of it. It turns a pleasing gray
                              > > color if it is left to weather for years, like an old lobster trap. And
                              > > yes, it works on plywood like a dream. You can get it cheap at:
                              > > >
                              > > > http://www.solventf reepaint. com/pine- tar.htm
                              > > >
                              > > > I regularly treat the hull of my 1928 trawler with pine tar oil, as
                              > > did her past owners, which is why she is 81 years old,has no rot, and
                              > > smells fresh inside.
                              > > >
                              > > > Don
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                            • BrianA
                              Hi Don, The folder is there, but the trawler photo didn t make it somehow. Another source for the pine tar is at http://www.tarsmell.com/ They also sell Le
                              Message 14 of 21 , Dec 8, 2009
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Hi Don,

                                The folder is there, but the trawler photo didn't make it somehow.

                                Another source for the pine tar is at

                                http://www.tarsmell.com/

                                They also sell Le Tonkinoise Varnish which I think is the bees knees if you are into brightwork - in any it is a natural resin linseed and tung oil varnish that is solvent free and non-toxic.

                                I also remember somebody saying you could get it a saddle and livestock shops.

                                Cheers, Brian

                                --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "nichollstown" <nichollstown@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > John
                                >
                                > If you use good grade linseed oil, it will dry and not be tacky, but it takes a week or so. Also, a pinch of Japan Drier helps. I have found that after several applications, I let it bake in the sun for a day or so, then give it a good rubdown with a clean rag, to get any pooled areas off. Then just let it sit for a few more days, and it will all soak in and be non-tacky. It takes patience, but it is well worth it, compared to fiddling with epoxy and such.
                                >
                                > I usually pre-treat anything that is not being glued/caulked, before it is installed, that way it can be done ahead of time and dry for installation. Don't tar any area that is going to be glued or caulked, till after installation, as the tar will hinder the bond of the adhesive.
                                >
                                > As far as the coolseal, I have found it does not stay put on boat bottoms, even inside, as the moisture content of the wood is too high. It is fine on the sides above the waterline, where they get occasional wetting. It is great for bedding rubrails, toerails, and cabin sides. Also great as a deck material, when put over nylon screen material (window screen). I built several houseboats out of nothing but 1/4" ply and covered it with coolseal and window screen. The last one survived 3 hurricanes, without a leak in the cabin!!!
                                > I call it poor mans fiberglass, but it really is a superior way to go, as it stays flexible for decades.
                                >
                                > I posted a shot of my old trawler in the photo section as "1928"
                                >
                                > Don
                                >
                                > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, John Huft <t1ro2003@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Don,
                                > > The Stockholm Tar website said to cut it with linseed oil to make it thin enough to spread and penetrate. How long does it take to dry and how do you keep it from being tacky?
                                > >
                                > > Living in the Red Neck Riviera like I do, I know me some Cool Seal. You said not to use Cool Seal inside below the water line. Did you mean to say outside? I would suspect that the hydraulic pressure would force water through over time.
                                > > Thanks,
                                > > John Boy
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > ________________________________
                                > > From: nichollstown <nichollstown@>
                                > > To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
                                > > Sent: Mon, December 7, 2009 5:59:36 PM
                                > > Subject: [Michalak] Re: copper green (Stockholm Tar)
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > Nels and John
                                > >
                                > > I will post a pic of th,e old trawler, tomorrow, all my good ones are in my office oomputer, She was actually built by a Norweigan in Seattle Washington in 1928. I am sure those first generation immigrants continued to do things like they did in Norway, when they came to the U.S. The hull is planked in 2" Alaskan yellow cedar, which still looks new, when I drilled for a through hull, last year.
                                > >
                                > > I re-tar about once a year, or less, depending on how hard I use her. Since she still occasionally works for a living, some years I re-tar 2 or 3 times. Inside the hull is all unpainted, just a bit of varnish , and the rest is tar/linseed oil. The smell is fantastic, and gives an authentic aroma to match the ol' salt looks. I am a staunch believer in allowing the interior wood to breathe. The tar finish allows the wood to breath while waterproofing the wood.
                                > >
                                > > If you have the pine stumps available, it is not hard to make the tar yourself. Essentially you put the wood in a big can with a lid, and a drain tube out the bottom, and build a fire around the can. The wood gets hot and oozes the tar out, which drips to the bottm and out the tube to a collection container. We made some, years ago, in the Bahamas, using an old pressure cooker. The forrests there are loaded with old growth long leaf yellow pine, lots of resin!!!
                                > >
                                > > For longevity in a non-epoxy coated hull, I would rate pine tar and red lead as tops for preventing rot.
                                > >
                                > > Another product I use alot is Elastomeric Roof Sealer, which is a white, thick, latex type glop, which people in the south use to seal roofs on houses and mobile homes. Its about $15 a gal at home depot.
                                > > It is not good for using inside the hull below the waterline, but it is fantastic on decks and cabins. It totally seals and waterproofs the wood, and can be painted over with enamal or latex paint. I have fixed alot of leaky decks and cabin tops with this stuff. It is also a good bedding compound for above the waterline stuff.
                                > >
                                > > Its amazing what you can use in place of expensive "Marine stuff", heck I use plain old oil based Rustoleum to paint ($6 a quart) to paint most of my boats, it lasts for years and does not crack!
                                > >
                                > > Don Carson
                                > >
                                > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, "Nels A" <arvent@> wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > Hi Don.
                                > > >
                                > > > Any photos of your trawler?
                                > > >
                                > > > I have to agree that is great stuff - as is the aintFalun Red Exterior p
                                > > > - having recently visited Sweden and Norway - and saw countless examples
                                > > > of houses and boats that are over 100 years old in which both products
                                > > > were used.
                                > > >
                                > > > Not very easy to obtain - where I live at least - in Canada. Does the
                                > > > price include shipping? I tried to order some and they only accept pay
                                > > > pal which I do not have.
                                > > >
                                > > > I read in WB magazine the European Union were taking steps to ban its
                                > > > import to other countries. Why - I don't know.
                                > > >
                                > > > How often do you treat your boat?
                                > > >
                                > > > I am also interested in what Norwegians use on their bright finished
                                > > > hulls?
                                > > >
                                > > > Nels
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, "nichollstown" <nichollstown@ >
                                > > > wrote:
                                > > > >
                                > > > > If you want a real preservative, that is cheap and has been proven for
                                > > > centuries, try pine tar oil. I have used this stuff my whole life and
                                > > > have alway found it to really protect, seal, and have a really nice
                                > > > smell. It is what used to be known as "Stockholm tar" on the square
                                > > > riggers. Great for slushing on interiors of boats, to prevent rot.
                                > > > Not bad for you, as they make soap out of it. It turns a pleasing gray
                                > > > color if it is left to weather for years, like an old lobster trap. And
                                > > > yes, it works on plywood like a dream. You can get it cheap at:
                                > > > >
                                > > > > http://www.solventf reepaint. com/pine- tar.htm
                                > > > >
                                > > > > I regularly treat the hull of my 1928 trawler with pine tar oil, as
                                > > > did her past owners, which is why she is 81 years old,has no rot, and
                                > > > smells fresh inside.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Don
                                > > > >
                                > > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                > >
                                >
                              • Nels A
                                Brian, Seemed to work for me. Great photo - would like to see more:-) Nels ... if you are into brightwork - in any it is a natural resin linseed and tung oil
                                Message 15 of 21 , Dec 8, 2009
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Brian,

                                  Seemed to work for me. Great photo - would like to see more:-)

                                  Nels

                                  --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "BrianA" <bawrytr@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Hi Don,
                                  >
                                  > The folder is there, but the trawler photo didn't make it somehow.
                                  >
                                  > Another source for the pine tar is at
                                  >
                                  > http://www.tarsmell.com/
                                  >
                                  > They also sell Le Tonkinoise Varnish which I think is the bees knees
                                  if you are into brightwork - in any it is a natural resin linseed and
                                  tung oil varnish that is solvent free and non-toxic.
                                  >
                                  > I also remember somebody saying you could get it a saddle and
                                  livestock shops.
                                  >
                                  > Cheers, Brian
                                  >
                                • BrianA
                                  Yes, it s up now. Must have just looked too soon.
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Dec 8, 2009
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Yes, it's up now. Must have just looked too soon.

                                    --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Nels A" <arvent@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Brian,
                                    >
                                    > Seemed to work for me. Great photo - would like to see more:-)
                                    >
                                    > Nels
                                    >
                                    > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "BrianA" <bawrytr@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > Hi Don,
                                    > >
                                    > > The folder is there, but the trawler photo didn't make it somehow.
                                    > >
                                    > > Another source for the pine tar is at
                                    > >
                                    > > http://www.tarsmell.com/
                                    > >
                                    > > They also sell Le Tonkinoise Varnish which I think is the bees knees
                                    > if you are into brightwork - in any it is a natural resin linseed and
                                    > tung oil varnish that is solvent free and non-toxic.
                                    > >
                                    > > I also remember somebody saying you could get it a saddle and
                                    > livestock shops.
                                    > >
                                    > > Cheers, Brian
                                    > >
                                    >
                                  • John Huft
                                    Great looking boat Don. Where you snap that photo at? Looks like somewhere in the Bahamas. John Boy ________________________________ From: nichollstown
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Dec 8, 2009
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Great looking boat Don. Where you snap that photo at? Looks like somewhere in the Bahamas.
                                      John Boy




                                      ________________________________
                                      From: nichollstown <nichollstown@...>
                                      To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Tue, December 8, 2009 7:42:50 AM
                                      Subject: [Michalak] Re: copper green (Stockholm Tar)


                                      John

                                      If you use good grade linseed oil, it will dry and not be tacky, but it takes a week or so. Also, a pinch of Japan Drier helps. I have found that after several applications, I let it bake in the sun for a day or so, then give it a good rubdown with a clean rag, to get any pooled areas off. Then just let it sit for a few more days, and it will all soak in and be non-tacky. It takes patience, but it is well worth it, compared to fiddling with epoxy and such.

                                      I usually pre-treat anything that is not being glued/caulked, before it is installed, that way it can be done ahead of time and dry for installation. Don't tar any area that is going to be glued or caulked, till after installation, as the tar will hinder the bond of the adhesive.

                                      As far as the coolseal, I have found it does not stay put on boat bottoms, even inside, as the moisture content of the wood is too high. It is fine on the sides above the waterline, where they get occasional wetting. It is great for bedding rubrails, toerails, and cabin sides. Also great as a deck material, when put over nylon screen material (window screen). I built several houseboats out of nothing but 1/4" ply and covered it with coolseal and window screen. The last one survived 3 hurricanes, without a leak in the cabin!!!
                                      I call it poor mans fiberglass, but it really is a superior way to go, as it stays flexible for decades.

                                      I posted a shot of my old trawler in the photo section as "1928"

                                      Don

                                      --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, John Huft <t1ro2003@.. .> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Don,
                                      > The Stockholm Tar website said to cut it with linseed oil to make it thin enough to spread and penetrate. How long does it take to dry and how do you keep it from being tacky?
                                      >
                                      > Living in the Red Neck Riviera like I do, I know me some Cool Seal. You said not to use Cool Seal inside below the water line. Did you mean to say outside? I would suspect that the hydraulic pressure would force water through over time.
                                      > Thanks,
                                      > John Boy
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ____________ _________ _________ __
                                      > From: nichollstown <nichollstown@ ...>
                                      > To: Michalak@yahoogroup s.com
                                      > Sent: Mon, December 7, 2009 5:59:36 PM
                                      > Subject: [Michalak] Re: copper green (Stockholm Tar)
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Nels and John
                                      >
                                      > I will post a pic of th,e old trawler, tomorrow, all my good ones are in my office oomputer, She was actually built by a Norweigan in Seattle Washington in 1928. I am sure those first generation immigrants continued to do things like they did in Norway, when they came to the U.S. The hull is planked in 2" Alaskan yellow cedar, which still looks new, when I drilled for a through hull, last year.
                                      >
                                      > I re-tar about once a year, or less, depending on how hard I use her. Since she still occasionally works for a living, some years I re-tar 2 or 3 times. Inside the hull is all unpainted, just a bit of varnish , and the rest is tar/linseed oil. The smell is fantastic, and gives an authentic aroma to match the ol' salt looks. I am a staunch believer in allowing the interior wood to breathe. The tar finish allows the wood to breath while waterproofing the wood.
                                      >
                                      > If you have the pine stumps available, it is not hard to make the tar yourself. Essentially you put the wood in a big can with a lid, and a drain tube out the bottom, and build a fire around the can. The wood gets hot and oozes the tar out, which drips to the bottm and out the tube to a collection container. We made some, years ago, in the Bahamas, using an old pressure cooker. The forrests there are loaded with old growth long leaf yellow pine, lots of resin!!!
                                      >
                                      > For longevity in a non-epoxy coated hull, I would rate pine tar and red lead as tops for preventing rot.
                                      >
                                      > Another product I use alot is Elastomeric Roof Sealer, which is a white, thick, latex type glop, which people in the south use to seal roofs on houses and mobile homes. Its about $15 a gal at home depot.
                                      > It is not good for using inside the hull below the waterline, but it is fantastic on decks and cabins. It totally seals and waterproofs the wood, and can be painted over with enamal or latex paint. I have fixed alot of leaky decks and cabin tops with this stuff. It is also a good bedding compound for above the waterline stuff.
                                      >
                                      > Its amazing what you can use in place of expensive "Marine stuff", heck I use plain old oil based Rustoleum to paint ($6 a quart) to paint most of my boats, it lasts for years and does not crack!
                                      >
                                      > Don Carson
                                      >
                                      > --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, "Nels A" <arvent@> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > > Hi Don.
                                      > >
                                      > > Any photos of your trawler?
                                      > >
                                      > > I have to agree that is great stuff - as is the aintFalun Red Exterior p
                                      > > - having recently visited Sweden and Norway - and saw countless examples
                                      > > of houses and boats that are over 100 years old in which both products
                                      > > were used.
                                      > >
                                      > > Not very easy to obtain - where I live at least - in Canada. Does the
                                      > > price include shipping? I tried to order some and they only accept pay
                                      > > pal which I do not have.
                                      > >
                                      > > I read in WB magazine the European Union were taking steps to ban its
                                      > > import to other countries. Why - I don't know.
                                      > >
                                      > > How often do you treat your boat?
                                      > >
                                      > > I am also interested in what Norwegians use on their bright finished
                                      > > hulls?
                                      > >
                                      > > Nels
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, "nichollstown" <nichollstown@ >
                                      > > wrote:
                                      > > >
                                      > > > If you want a real preservative, that is cheap and has been proven for
                                      > > centuries, try pine tar oil. I have used this stuff my whole life and
                                      > > have alway found it to really protect, seal, and have a really nice
                                      > > smell. It is what used to be known as "Stockholm tar" on the square
                                      > > riggers. Great for slushing on interiors of boats, to prevent rot.
                                      > > Not bad for you, as they make soap out of it. It turns a pleasing gray
                                      > > color if it is left to weather for years, like an old lobster trap. And
                                      > > yes, it works on plywood like a dream. You can get it cheap at:
                                      > > >
                                      > > > http://www.solventf reepaint. com/pine- tar.htm
                                      > > >
                                      > > > I regularly treat the hull of my 1928 trawler with pine tar oil, as
                                      > > did her past owners, which is why she is 81 years old,has no rot, and
                                      > > smells fresh inside.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Don
                                      > > >
                                      > >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      >







                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • nichollstown
                                      You are right, it is the Bahamas. That was taken last year at Morgans Bluff. North Andros. One of my favorite spots in the Bahamas, as it is not a Yachtie
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Dec 8, 2009
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        You are right, it is the Bahamas. That was taken last year at Morgans Bluff. North Andros. One of my favorite spots in the Bahamas, as it is not a "Yachtie" place, just a working harbor, with beautiful waters and nice folks. Hopefully by next summer I will have my latest sailboat restoration finished, and we will be back there again.
                                        Don

                                        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, John Huft <t1ro2003@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Great looking boat Don. Where you snap that photo at? Looks like somewhere in the Bahamas.
                                        > John Boy
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > ________________________________
                                        > From: nichollstown <nichollstown@...>
                                        > To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
                                        > Sent: Tue, December 8, 2009 7:42:50 AM
                                        > Subject: [Michalak] Re: copper green (Stockholm Tar)
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > John
                                        >
                                        > If you use good grade linseed oil, it will dry and not be tacky, but it takes a week or so. Also, a pinch of Japan Drier helps. I have found that after several applications, I let it bake in the sun for a day or so, then give it a good rubdown with a clean rag, to get any pooled areas off. Then just let it sit for a few more days, and it will all soak in and be non-tacky. It takes patience, but it is well worth it, compared to fiddling with epoxy and such.
                                        >
                                        > I usually pre-treat anything that is not being glued/caulked, before it is installed, that way it can be done ahead of time and dry for installation. Don't tar any area that is going to be glued or caulked, till after installation, as the tar will hinder the bond of the adhesive.
                                        >
                                        > As far as the coolseal, I have found it does not stay put on boat bottoms, even inside, as the moisture content of the wood is too high. It is fine on the sides above the waterline, where they get occasional wetting. It is great for bedding rubrails, toerails, and cabin sides. Also great as a deck material, when put over nylon screen material (window screen). I built several houseboats out of nothing but 1/4" ply and covered it with coolseal and window screen. The last one survived 3 hurricanes, without a leak in the cabin!!!
                                        > I call it poor mans fiberglass, but it really is a superior way to go, as it stays flexible for decades.
                                        >
                                        > I posted a shot of my old trawler in the photo section as "1928"
                                        >
                                        > Don
                                        >
                                        > --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, John Huft <t1ro2003@ .> wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > Don,
                                        > > The Stockholm Tar website said to cut it with linseed oil to make it thin enough to spread and penetrate. How long does it take to dry and how do you keep it from being tacky?
                                        > >
                                        > > Living in the Red Neck Riviera like I do, I know me some Cool Seal. You said not to use Cool Seal inside below the water line. Did you mean to say outside? I would suspect that the hydraulic pressure would force water through over time.
                                        > > Thanks,
                                        > > John Boy
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > > ____________ _________ _________ __
                                        > > From: nichollstown <nichollstown@ ...>
                                        > > To: Michalak@yahoogroup s.com
                                        > > Sent: Mon, December 7, 2009 5:59:36 PM
                                        > > Subject: [Michalak] Re: copper green (Stockholm Tar)
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > > Nels and John
                                        > >
                                        > > I will post a pic of th,e old trawler, tomorrow, all my good ones are in my office oomputer, She was actually built by a Norweigan in Seattle Washington in 1928. I am sure those first generation immigrants continued to do things like they did in Norway, when they came to the U.S. The hull is planked in 2" Alaskan yellow cedar, which still looks new, when I drilled for a through hull, last year.
                                        > >
                                        > > I re-tar about once a year, or less, depending on how hard I use her. Since she still occasionally works for a living, some years I re-tar 2 or 3 times. Inside the hull is all unpainted, just a bit of varnish , and the rest is tar/linseed oil. The smell is fantastic, and gives an authentic aroma to match the ol' salt looks. I am a staunch believer in allowing the interior wood to breathe. The tar finish allows the wood to breath while waterproofing the wood.
                                        > >
                                        > > If you have the pine stumps available, it is not hard to make the tar yourself. Essentially you put the wood in a big can with a lid, and a drain tube out the bottom, and build a fire around the can. The wood gets hot and oozes the tar out, which drips to the bottm and out the tube to a collection container. We made some, years ago, in the Bahamas, using an old pressure cooker. The forrests there are loaded with old growth long leaf yellow pine, lots of resin!!!
                                        > >
                                        > > For longevity in a non-epoxy coated hull, I would rate pine tar and red lead as tops for preventing rot.
                                        > >
                                        > > Another product I use alot is Elastomeric Roof Sealer, which is a white, thick, latex type glop, which people in the south use to seal roofs on houses and mobile homes. Its about $15 a gal at home depot.
                                        > > It is not good for using inside the hull below the waterline, but it is fantastic on decks and cabins. It totally seals and waterproofs the wood, and can be painted over with enamal or latex paint. I have fixed alot of leaky decks and cabin tops with this stuff. It is also a good bedding compound for above the waterline stuff.
                                        > >
                                        > > Its amazing what you can use in place of expensive "Marine stuff", heck I use plain old oil based Rustoleum to paint ($6 a quart) to paint most of my boats, it lasts for years and does not crack!
                                        > >
                                        > > Don Carson
                                        > >
                                        > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, "Nels A" <arvent@> wrote:
                                        > > >
                                        > > > Hi Don.
                                        > > >
                                        > > > Any photos of your trawler?
                                        > > >
                                        > > > I have to agree that is great stuff - as is the aintFalun Red Exterior p
                                        > > > - having recently visited Sweden and Norway - and saw countless examples
                                        > > > of houses and boats that are over 100 years old in which both products
                                        > > > were used.
                                        > > >
                                        > > > Not very easy to obtain - where I live at least - in Canada. Does the
                                        > > > price include shipping? I tried to order some and they only accept pay
                                        > > > pal which I do not have.
                                        > > >
                                        > > > I read in WB magazine the European Union were taking steps to ban its
                                        > > > import to other countries. Why - I don't know.
                                        > > >
                                        > > > How often do you treat your boat?
                                        > > >
                                        > > > I am also interested in what Norwegians use on their bright finished
                                        > > > hulls?
                                        > > >
                                        > > > Nels
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroup s.com, "nichollstown" <nichollstown@ >
                                        > > > wrote:
                                        > > > >
                                        > > > > If you want a real preservative, that is cheap and has been proven for
                                        > > > centuries, try pine tar oil. I have used this stuff my whole life and
                                        > > > have alway found it to really protect, seal, and have a really nice
                                        > > > smell. It is what used to be known as "Stockholm tar" on the square
                                        > > > riggers. Great for slushing on interiors of boats, to prevent rot.
                                        > > > Not bad for you, as they make soap out of it. It turns a pleasing gray
                                        > > > color if it is left to weather for years, like an old lobster trap. And
                                        > > > yes, it works on plywood like a dream. You can get it cheap at:
                                        > > > >
                                        > > > > http://www.solventf reepaint. com/pine- tar.htm
                                        > > > >
                                        > > > > I regularly treat the hull of my 1928 trawler with pine tar oil, as
                                        > > > did her past owners, which is why she is 81 years old,has no rot, and
                                        > > > smells fresh inside.
                                        > > > >
                                        > > > > Don
                                        > > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        > >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        >
                                      • John Kohnen
                                        The photo s there: http://tinyurl.com/yhqq6wm Looks like a nice little double-ended NW troller. Don t ever call a troller a trawler in the Bay Haven tavern
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Dec 9, 2009
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          The photo's there:

                                          http://tinyurl.com/yhqq6wm

                                          Looks like a nice little double-ended NW troller. Don't ever call a
                                          "troller" a "trawler" in the Bay Haven tavern on a Saturday night! ;o)
                                          Trolling is a fairly selective hook and line way to catch fish, and
                                          trollers are usually owned by the men or women who fish them. Troll
                                          fishermen consider themselves to be an elite breed and look down their
                                          noses at the trawlers (draggers) that drag big nets that scrape up
                                          everything indiscriminately.

                                          On Tue, 08 Dec 2009 06:21:18 -0800, Brian A wrote:

                                          > Hi Don,
                                          >
                                          > The folder is there, but the trawler photo didn't make it somehow.
                                          > ...

                                          --
                                          John (jkohnen@...)
                                          To read fast is as bad as to eat in a hurry. (Vilhelm Ekelund)
                                        • John Kohnen
                                          Is Cuprinol dark green in a noxious mineral spirits carrier, and does it dry leaving a waxy feeling coat on top of the wood? If so, it s copper naphthanate.
                                          Message 20 of 21 , Dec 9, 2009
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            Is Cuprinol dark green in a noxious mineral spirits carrier, and does it
                                            dry leaving a waxy feeling coat on top of the wood? If so, it's copper
                                            naphthanate. I've only used other brands of copper based preservative, so
                                            I gotta ask... Years ago, John Gardner wrote some articles for National
                                            Fisherman about wood preservatives and their dangers. About that time I
                                            went to work for the County repairing the homes of poor or elderly people
                                            (funded mostly by the feds) and some of the crews were slathering Penta
                                            all over everything, and themselves, when doing repairs to the
                                            underpinnings of houses. Of course Penta (pentachlorophenol, IIRC) is
                                            REALLY bad stuff. I posted Gardner's articles on the bulletin board and
                                            tried to convince people to use copper naphthanate (Green Guard was the
                                            brand I used) because Gardner thought that was the stuff that was least
                                            dangerous but also quite effective. I'm not saying copper naphthanate is
                                            _safe_, only relatively so. As far as immediate danger goes, I think the
                                            solvent carrier is the worst hazard. Copper is just a plain ordinary
                                            poison, not some weird invention with even weirder ways to do you in. <g>
                                            Copper naphthanate is hard to paint over, and I wouldn't expect adhesives
                                            or resins to stick to it very well.

                                            There was a beautiful Crocker designed cutter, Jinker, down on the Coast
                                            that an old fellow restored. He applied some awful kind of wood
                                            preservative to the whole inside of the boat. I was there when she went
                                            back in the water. He was a happy man! :o) Sometime later I talked to the
                                            people living on the boat in the slip next to Jinker. She looked kinda
                                            forlorn and empty. The fellow had been living aboard her, or at least
                                            spending many nights aboard her. He began to feel ill. Then really ill. It
                                            was the wood preservative. He had to go live with his kids in California,
                                            and I don't know if he ever got right again. :o( As for Jinker, the
                                            neighbor said that They said that the only way to, maybe, make her safe
                                            would be to scrub down the entire inside of the boat with lacquer thinner,
                                            or acetone, or something like that, and air her out for months! I don't
                                            know what ever happened to her, she's no longer in the marina...

                                            On Sun, 06 Dec 2009 08:00:32 -0800, johninbastrop wrote:

                                            > Cuprinol is nasty dangerous stuff.... if it is still available? Don't
                                            > touch smell it, drip it, or even get close enough to see it.. Ultimate
                                            > bad stuff. Disclaimer... I am not careful about protection from all the
                                            > many chemicals, and I have many.. Cuprinol is super bad...or a lot worse
                                            > than that. But, it was the only thing to keep expensive shrimp nets
                                            > (when made of cotton cord) from rotting in just couple of months.


                                            --
                                            John (jkohnen@...)
                                            I cannot help thinking that the people with motor boats miss a
                                            great deal. If they would only keep to rowboats or canoes, and
                                            use oar or paddle... they would get infinitely more benefit than
                                            by having their work done for them by gasoline. (Theodore
                                            Roosevelt)
                                          • nichollstown
                                            You are right John, it is an old Troller, but not a double ender, she has a nice little transom on her. I got out of the habit of calling her a troller, as
                                            Message 21 of 21 , Dec 9, 2009
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              You are right John, it is an old Troller, but not a double ender, she has a nice little transom on her. I got out of the habit of calling her a troller, as most people in Florida have no idea what that is. She was activly fished from 1928 till 1992, when she was trucked to Florida. I keep her in commercial registry, as she still a good little salvage boat, and to do the odd tow job. She's a great little boat, and has now sailed on all the major bodies of salt water, in the U.S., as we did the Gulf of Mexico last year. Not bad for an 81 fish boat!
                                              Don

                                              --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "John Kohnen" <jhkohnen@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > The photo's there:
                                              >
                                              > http://tinyurl.com/yhqq6wm
                                              >
                                              > Looks like a nice little double-ended NW troller. Don't ever call a
                                              > "troller" a "trawler" in the Bay Haven tavern on a Saturday night! ;o)
                                              > Trolling is a fairly selective hook and line way to catch fish, and
                                              > trollers are usually owned by the men or women who fish them. Troll
                                              > fishermen consider themselves to be an elite breed and look down their
                                              > noses at the trawlers (draggers) that drag big nets that scrape up
                                              > everything indiscriminately.
                                              >
                                              > On Tue, 08 Dec 2009 06:21:18 -0800, Brian A wrote:
                                              >
                                              > > Hi Don,
                                              > >
                                              > > The folder is there, but the trawler photo didn't make it somehow.
                                              > > ...
                                              >
                                              > --
                                              > John (jkohnen@...)
                                              > To read fast is as bad as to eat in a hurry. (Vilhelm Ekelund)
                                              >
                                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.