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Lining up leeboard supports

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  • BrianA
    I am getting ready to install a Michalak-style leeboard on a 15 flat-bottomed boat, but have been scratching my head a bit as to a good way of making sure the
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 8, 2009
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      I am getting ready to install a Michalak-style leeboard on a 15' flat-bottomed boat, but have been scratching my head a bit as to a good way of making sure the pivot board and the retaining board/slot at the gunwale are lined up with each other and parallel to the centerline.

      Anybody got any good ideas?

      Cheers, Brian
    • Alan Shapcott
      If you have no cabin and can therefore run something down the center-line, then I guess you could clamp a long straight stick to the guide components and
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 8, 2009
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        If you have no cabin and can therefore run something down the center-line,
        then I guess you could clamp a long straight 'stick' to the guide components and measure out to its ends from the center-line?
         
        --- On Thu, 8/10/09, BrianA <bawrytr@...> wrote:

        From: BrianA <bawrytr@...>
        Subject: [Michalak] Lining up leeboard supports
        To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
        Received: Thursday, 8 October, 2009, 8:01 PM

        I am getting ready to install a Michalak-style leeboard on a 15' flat-bottomed boat, but have been scratching my head a bit as to a good way of making sure the pivot board and the retaining board/slot at the gunwale are lined up with each other and parallel to the centerline.

        Anybody got any good ideas?

        Cheers, Brian



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      • gary
        There s got to be an easier way, but here s what I do. Make sure the centerline is drawn clearly on the outside of the transom. Cut out the lower guard a few
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 8, 2009
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          There's got to be an easier way, but here's what I do. Make sure the centerline is drawn clearly on the outside of the transom. Cut out the lower guard a few inches wider than it needs to be, scribe it to fit the curve of the hull, and temporarily fasten it in place. Clamp or temporarily fasten a stick to the transom parallel to the waterline and at the same height as the leeboard guard. It should extend at least to the centerline on the inboard end and several inches beyond the widest part of the hull on the outboard end. (My Frolic2 is 5' wide, the stick would be 30 inches to be the half width of the hull, plus 1.5 inches to the minimum width of the guard, plus a few extra inches for good measure, or about 35-36 inches overall.) Tie a string to the stick, about 34 inches from the centerline. Get a helper to hold a stick at the bow. Tie the string to this stick the same distance from the bow centerline as it is from the transom centerline. where it passes over the leeboard will be parallel to the board centerline. Mark it. When you figure out the final width of the guard, simply draw that line parallel to the one you've established.

          An alternate method would be to run a string or plank down centerline of the hull on top of the bulkheads & frames. Tie a plumb bob to a stick at the proper distance (34 inches or so in the case of my Frolic2) and use that to establish the parallel line on the guard. (Caveat, I don't have and have never used a plumb bob, but it seems like this would work!).

          Repeat either method for the upper guard . . .

          Hope this helps.

          Gary

          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "BrianA" <bawrytr@...> wrote:
          >
          > I am getting ready to install a Michalak-style leeboard on a 15' flat-bottomed boat, but have been scratching my head a bit as to a good way of making sure the pivot board and the retaining board/slot at the gunwale are lined up with each other and parallel to the centerline.
          >
          > Anybody got any good ideas?
          >
          > Cheers, Brian
          >
        • cmdrslmdr
          Gary, I actually used a plumb bob to help me accomplish this task. You have to level the boat side to side beforehand. Here is my explanation of how I lined up
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 8, 2009
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            Gary,

            I actually used a plumb bob to help me accomplish this task. You have to level the boat side to side beforehand.

            Here is my explanation of how I lined up the upper leeboard guard:

            http://buildingladybug.wordpress.com/2008/06/24/10195-june-18-232008-leeboard/

            And lining up the lower leeboard support:

            http://buildingladybug.wordpress.com/2008/06/25/4199-leeboard-guards-nearly-done/

            Here is one photo of a few that I took while lining this up. There are more in that Flickr set:

            http://www.flickr.com/photos/kommander05/2943755182/in/set-72157607999845304/

            All very similar to what has been previously mentioned.

            Cheers,

            Murray






            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "gary" <gbship@...> wrote:
            >
            > There's got to be an easier way, but here's what I do. Make sure the centerline is drawn clearly on the outside of the transom. Cut out the lower guard a few inches wider than it needs to be, scribe it to fit the curve of the hull, and temporarily fasten it in place. Clamp or temporarily fasten a stick to the transom parallel to the waterline and at the same height as the leeboard guard. It should extend at least to the centerline on the inboard end and several inches beyond the widest part of the hull on the outboard end. (My Frolic2 is 5' wide, the stick would be 30 inches to be the half width of the hull, plus 1.5 inches to the minimum width of the guard, plus a few extra inches for good measure, or about 35-36 inches overall.) Tie a string to the stick, about 34 inches from the centerline. Get a helper to hold a stick at the bow. Tie the string to this stick the same distance from the bow centerline as it is from the transom centerline. where it passes over the leeboard will be parallel to the board centerline. Mark it. When you figure out the final width of the guard, simply draw that line parallel to the one you've established.
            >
            > An alternate method would be to run a string or plank down centerline of the hull on top of the bulkheads & frames. Tie a plumb bob to a stick at the proper distance (34 inches or so in the case of my Frolic2) and use that to establish the parallel line on the guard. (Caveat, I don't have and have never used a plumb bob, but it seems like this would work!).
            >
            > Repeat either method for the upper guard . . .
            >
            > Hope this helps.
            >
            > Gary
            >
            > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "BrianA" <bawrytr@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I am getting ready to install a Michalak-style leeboard on a 15' flat-bottomed boat, but have been scratching my head a bit as to a good way of making sure the pivot board and the retaining board/slot at the gunwale are lined up with each other and parallel to the centerline.
            > >
            > > Anybody got any good ideas?
            > >
            > > Cheers, Brian
            > >
            >
          • BrianA
            You know the funny thing is that I bought a plumb bob at the start of the project to do the job, and with a garden project in mind. Plus I was in a museum a
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 8, 2009
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              You know the funny thing is that I bought a plumb bob at the start of the project to do the job, and with a garden project in mind. Plus I was in a museum a while back and saw one from the early middle ages and was interested to see that the design had not changed at all (I am a real tool geek when it comes to stuff like that). But somehow it has disappeared and after tearing the shop apart looking for the thing, I told myself "get it done" and ended up using a 1 meter water level.

              I ran a string down the centerline, clamped two boards about 5 feet apart athwartships with their butt ends lined up under the string and then leveled the boat out. I would have liked to put the boards farther apart, but was constrained by where I could clamp them. It was then relatively simple, but fiddly to get everything lined up using the level and a long piece of aluminum u-channel that I use when I need a long straightedge.

              I just measured out from the centerline on the two boards, clamped the u-channel in place to find the inner and outer edges of the guards and then used the water level to mark everything. I think the plumb bob would have been better though.

              As near as I can measure and eyeball, everything looks straight and square.

              The one small hitch was that I made the board very early in the project and made it more or less a foil shape. But for some reason I had a mind fart and carried the foil shape all the way up the board, and so there is only about a 4" width that is more or less flat to bear on the lower guard. I am not sure if this is going to be a problem or not, as the upper guard should serve to keep the board lined up. But we will see how it goes, and it would not be complicated to fill out the foil area flat so it bears all along the lower guard if I need to.

              Thanks and cheers, Brian

              --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "cmdrslmdr" <murrays@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Gary,
              >
              > I actually used a plumb bob to help me accomplish this task. You have to level the boat side to side beforehand.
              >
              > Here is my explanation of how I lined up the upper leeboard guard:
              >
              > http://buildingladybug.wordpress.com/2008/06/24/10195-june-18-232008-leeboard/
              >
              > And lining up the lower leeboard support:
              >
              > http://buildingladybug.wordpress.com/2008/06/25/4199-leeboard-guards-nearly-done/
              >
              > Here is one photo of a few that I took while lining this up. There are more in that Flickr set:
              >
              > http://www.flickr.com/photos/kommander05/2943755182/in/set-72157607999845304/
              >
              > All very similar to what has been previously mentioned.
              >
              > Cheers,
              >
              > Murray
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "gary" <gbship@> wrote:
              > >
              > > There's got to be an easier way, but here's what I do. Make sure the centerline is drawn clearly on the outside of the transom. Cut out the lower guard a few inches wider than it needs to be, scribe it to fit the curve of the hull, and temporarily fasten it in place. Clamp or temporarily fasten a stick to the transom parallel to the waterline and at the same height as the leeboard guard. It should extend at least to the centerline on the inboard end and several inches beyond the widest part of the hull on the outboard end. (My Frolic2 is 5' wide, the stick would be 30 inches to be the half width of the hull, plus 1.5 inches to the minimum width of the guard, plus a few extra inches for good measure, or about 35-36 inches overall.) Tie a string to the stick, about 34 inches from the centerline. Get a helper to hold a stick at the bow. Tie the string to this stick the same distance from the bow centerline as it is from the transom centerline. where it passes over the leeboard will be parallel to the board centerline. Mark it. When you figure out the final width of the guard, simply draw that line parallel to the one you've established.
              > >
              > > An alternate method would be to run a string or plank down centerline of the hull on top of the bulkheads & frames. Tie a plumb bob to a stick at the proper distance (34 inches or so in the case of my Frolic2) and use that to establish the parallel line on the guard. (Caveat, I don't have and have never used a plumb bob, but it seems like this would work!).
              > >
              > > Repeat either method for the upper guard . . .
              > >
              > > Hope this helps.
              > >
              > > Gary
              > >
              > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "BrianA" <bawrytr@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > I am getting ready to install a Michalak-style leeboard on a 15' flat-bottomed boat, but have been scratching my head a bit as to a good way of making sure the pivot board and the retaining board/slot at the gunwale are lined up with each other and parallel to the centerline.
              > > >
              > > > Anybody got any good ideas?
              > > >
              > > > Cheers, Brian
              > > >
              > >
              >
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