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Leeboard "water climb"

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  • buildboats
    I had my Trilars out for a sail last weekend in 15+ winds which was great fun. At about 5.5 MPH I had one hull out of the water, but still stable as a dock.
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 9, 2009
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      I had my Trilars out for a sail last weekend in 15+ winds which was great fun. At about 5.5 MPH I had one hull out of the water, but still stable as a dock. I did experience an interesing situation with the leedboard at higher speeds. The water seemed to climb up the leeboard through the guard and into the boat. Has anyone else had anything like this happen? If so what did you do about it?

      Also what have folks used to hold the leeboard up when there are no lateral forces helping, has anyone used one of those special cleats that release under pressure?

      Thanks All

      Tom
    • John and Kathy Trussell
      I can t help with water climbing the leeboard-maybe some sort of wood strip to block the water? I have used the cleat ( auto release cam cleat from Duckworks)
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 9, 2009
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        I can't help with water climbing the leeboard-maybe some sort of wood strip
        to block the water?



        I have used the cleat ("auto release cam cleat" from Duckworks) and it works
        very well. I used it after I just brushed the bottom which caused the
        leeboard on my Toon 19 to float upward (which I did not notice at the time).
        The cleat releases with an audible "pop" which alerts me to the situation.



        Hope this helps.



        JohnT



        _____

        From: Michalak@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Michalak@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of buildboats
        Sent: Wednesday, September 09, 2009 7:39 AM
        To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Michalak] Leeboard "water climb"





        I had my Trilars out for a sail last weekend in 15+ winds which was great
        fun. At about 5.5 MPH I had one hull out of the water, but still stable as a
        dock. I did experience an interesing situation with the leedboard at higher
        speeds. The water seemed to climb up the leeboard through the guard and into
        the boat. Has anyone else had anything like this happen? If so what did you
        do about it?

        Also what have folks used to hold the leeboard up when there are no lateral
        forces helping, has anyone used one of those special cleats that release
        under pressure?

        Thanks All

        Tom





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • John and Kathy Trussell
        I can t help with water climbing the leeboard-maybe some sort of wood strip to block the water? I have used the cleat ( auto release cam cleat from Duckworks)
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 9, 2009
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          I can't help with water climbing the leeboard-maybe some sort of wood strip
          to block the water?



          I have used the cleat ("auto release cam cleat" from Duckworks) and it works
          very well. I used it after I just brushed the bottom which caused the
          leeboard on my Toon 19 to float upward (which I did not notice at the time).
          The cleat releases with an audible "pop" which alerts me to the situation.



          Hope this helps.



          JohnT



          _____

          From: Michalak@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Michalak@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
          Of buildboats
          Sent: Wednesday, September 09, 2009 7:39 AM
          To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Michalak] Leeboard "water climb"





          I had my Trilars out for a sail last weekend in 15+ winds which was great
          fun. At about 5.5 MPH I had one hull out of the water, but still stable as a
          dock. I did experience an interesing situation with the leedboard at higher
          speeds. The water seemed to climb up the leeboard through the guard and into
          the boat. Has anyone else had anything like this happen? If so what did you
          do about it?

          Also what have folks used to hold the leeboard up when there are no lateral
          forces helping, has anyone used one of those special cleats that release
          under pressure?

          Thanks All

          Tom





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • gbship
          Hi, Tom: Glad to hear the Trilars sails well! John is right, best thing to hold the leeboard down is one of Chuck s self releasing cleats. They re one of the
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 9, 2009
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            Hi, Tom:
            Glad to hear the Trilars sails well! John is right, best thing to hold the leeboard down is one of Chuck's self releasing cleats. They're one of the more expensive pieces of gear he sells, but not that bad and worth every penny. As John noted, they both hold the board down and alert you with an audible "pop" when the board hits bottom and releases.

            As for the water climbing, I suspect at higher speeds part of your bow wave is hitting the board, above where it's faired and the "flat face" section is funneling the water up the board. Try fairing a little further up. I seem to remember Bolger relating in one of his books he had a narrow flat section on one of his powerboats stems and at the right speed, a stream of water would climb up the stem and arc back in a graceful curve right into the helmsman's face . . .

            Gary

            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "buildboats" <buildboats@...> wrote:
            >
            > I had my Trilars out for a sail last weekend in 15+ winds which was great fun. At about 5.5 MPH I had one hull out of the water, but still stable as a dock. I did experience an interesing situation with the leedboard at higher speeds. The water seemed to climb up the leeboard through the guard and into the boat. Has anyone else had anything like this happen? If so what did you do about it?
            >
            > Also what have folks used to hold the leeboard up when there are no lateral forces helping, has anyone used one of those special cleats that release under pressure?
            >
            > Thanks All
            >
            > Tom
            >
          • traidna
            Thanks John and Gary, I ll need to order one from Chuck. Gary that makes sense about the leeboard, bow wave, and the leeboard angled due to slight heel and
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 10, 2009
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              Thanks John and Gary,

              I'll need to order one from Chuck.

              Gary that makes sense about the leeboard, bow wave, and the leeboard angled due to slight heel and lateral push inboard, which would explain why it was only happening on one tack. On a side note Jeff McLamb put a 500 gal/hour (small) bilge pump in his Trilars, might be worth thinking about for any extended Trilars voyages, especially in a 20' version.

              Tom
            • gbship
              Tom: So, how wet did you get? I ve had a feeling Trilars is a pretty wet craft in a breeze; all the sailing kayaks seem to be. I ve got one of those small 3
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 10, 2009
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                Tom:
                So, how wet did you get? I've had a feeling Trilars is a pretty wet craft in a breeze; all the sailing kayaks seem to be. I've got one of those small 3 D-cell powered bilge pumps that I expect will be essential equipment on ours. Also may look at a small dodger at the forward end as well as a good spray skirt.

                Gary

                --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "traidna" <traidna@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thanks John and Gary,
                >
                > I'll need to order one from Chuck.
                >
                > Gary that makes sense about the leeboard, bow wave, and the leeboard angled due to slight heel and lateral push inboard, which would explain why it was only happening on one tack. On a side note Jeff McLamb put a 500 gal/hour (small) bilge pump in his Trilars, might be worth thinking about for any extended Trilars voyages, especially in a 20' version.
                >
                > Tom
                >
              • traidna
                Gary, It really wasn t that wet just enough to puddle 1/2 I sit on a boat cushion and didn t really get wet. I keep a sham-wow handy for wiping up and
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 10, 2009
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                  Gary,

                  It really wasn't that wet just enough to puddle 1/2" I sit on a boat cushion and didn't really get wet. I keep a sham-wow handy for wiping up and bailing. If you hit the link to Jeff McLamb's site buildboats.com you'll see his front spray skirt.

                  When I was out on Sunday I ran into Jeff's friend and partner in boatbuilding in his Toto and he said the skirt stopped 80% of the spray.

                  The dodger would be way cool, I've been thinking about a convertable hard top - same idea in plywood, but I've also been thinking about a boat where I can sit on a seat :)

                  Tom
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