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Re: Mayfly 14 - complete list of lumber?

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  • svagene
    ... Mayfly ... first ... says enough ... start ... has ... and the ... rudder ... lumber ... off with ... transom ... enquiry from ... Nels, The word
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 5, 2009
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      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Nels" <arvent@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "svagene" <svagene@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello!
      > > Does anyone have a total overview of the lumber needed for a
      Mayfly
      > > 14? I already have the plywood.
      > >
      > > The book (Yes, I bought it - TWICE - darn airport people lost my
      first
      > > one) says the dimensions, but a lot of places it only
      says "enough
      > > 3/4inch x 1,5inch", "some 2x4" etc. I'm just looking for an easy
      > > shopping list if anyone has any experience to share. Thanks!
      > >
      > > Sig
      > > Bergen, Norway
      > >
      > > PS: Will post my first pictures this weekend of the shop and the
      start
      > > of the boat. And heck, I might even throw in one of all the snow
      > > outside.
      > >
      >
      > Sorry I can't help you very much but looking in the book sheet #2
      has
      > the plywood cutting pattern that shows 5 sheets of 1/4" plywood,
      and the
      > photo on the front cover shows 6 - 14 ft. sticks and some 1X4 inch
      > framing lumber. But I think that is for the basic rowing version.
      >
      > For the sailing version you need a sheet of 1/2" plywood for the
      rudder
      > and leeboard and guard etc. and probably 3 times the amount of
      lumber
      > shown in the cover photo for mast and yards. tiller etc.
      >
      > And remember the chines and wales are beveled so you have start
      off with
      > wider sticks than the final measurements state. Same with the
      transom
      > framing.
      >
      > May I ask what kind of plywood you are using? I have had an
      enquiry from
      > a person in Norway who was wondering about one called " Kryssfinèr
      > Lauan-Meranti plater" Have you heard of it?
      >
      > Nels
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >

      Nels,
      "
      The word "Kryssfinèr" is the Norwegian word for "plywood",
      and "plater" is the word for "sheet". "Lauan-Meranti" is the name of
      the wood it self, I believe this is a kind of lower-quality wood.
      I've seen on some other forums that they recommend against using
      Meranti (which is a sort of fast-growing pine), since it often
      contains voids and air inside the sheets.

      I use Marine quality Okoume plywood in what is known as a BS 1088-
      standard.

      As for plywood, I'm all set for my Mayfly, it's 3 sheets of 1/4" and
      2 sheets of 1/2".

      Have a nice day!

      Sig
    • svagene
      ... pretty ... Don t ... wood ... Mayfly ... first ... says enough ... start ... Ok, thanks for the tips! I will just buy enough so I have some left overs
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 5, 2009
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        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Feller" <chrisbfeller@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Jim is pretty good about giving you the plywood requirements on his
        > plans but does not include a lumber list. You can calculate it
        pretty
        > easily by adding up the length and dimensions from the plans.
        Don't
        > forget to account for waste from saw cuts and lengths that don't
        > divide equally.
        >
        > I usually just get more than enough and have some left over for the
        > next boat. I have found I build a boat every 1-2 years so extra
        wood
        > is never a problem for me.
        >
        > Chris Feller
        >
        > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "svagene" <svagene@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hello!
        > > Does anyone have a total overview of the lumber needed for a
        Mayfly
        > > 14? I already have the plywood.
        > >
        > > The book (Yes, I bought it - TWICE - darn airport people lost my
        first
        > > one) says the dimensions, but a lot of places it only
        says "enough
        > > 3/4inch x 1,5inch", "some 2x4" etc. I'm just looking for an easy
        > > shopping list if anyone has any experience to share. Thanks!
        > >
        > > Sig
        > > Bergen, Norway
        > >
        > > PS: Will post my first pictures this weekend of the shop and the
        start
        > > of the boat. And heck, I might even throw in one of all the snow
        > > outside.
        > >
        >

        Ok, thanks for the tips!

        I will just buy enough so I have some left overs then, I guess I can
        always use it for something...

        Have a nice day!

        Sig
      • Nels
        ... Thanks Sig, I believe there is some meranti that is BS1088 certified - but I doubt this was it - based on the price mentioned. Here is a quote from the
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 5, 2009
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          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "svagene" <svagene@...> wrote:
          > Nels,
          > "
          > The word "Kryssfinèr" is the Norwegian word for "plywood",
          > and "plater" is the word for "sheet". "Lauan-Meranti" is the name of
          > the wood it self, I believe this is a kind of lower-quality wood.
          > I've seen on some other forums that they recommend against using
          > Meranti (which is a sort of fast-growing pine), since it often
          > contains voids and air inside the sheets.
          >
          > I use Marine quality Okoume plywood in what is known as a BS 1088-
          > standard.
          >
          > As for plywood, I'm all set for my Mayfly, it's 3 sheets of 1/4" and
          > 2 sheets of 1/2".
          >
          > Have a nice day!
          >
          > Sig

          Thanks Sig,

          I believe there is some meranti that is BS1088 certified - but I doubt
          this was it - based on the price mentioned. Here is a quote from the
          person who inquired.


          2'x4' is called Justert (adjusted) K-virke C-18, 48x098mm I
          guess. It cost kr.16,90 per length meter.



          Plywood is Kryssfinèr Lauan-Meranti plater (sheets) ("as used
          commonly in building houses in America," the guy said):

          All are 122x244 (I guess that is CM in this case)



          Thicknesses as follows: 6mm=kr.189

          9mm=kr.289

          12mm=kr.369

          15mm=kr.459

          22mm=kr.679

          This from an American lady now living near Drammen.

          2X4 "adjusted price" is about $3/ft USD - so I can see why you don't
          want to buy more than you require!


          Nels










          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • svagene
          ... name of ... 1088- ... and ... doubt ... the ... don t ... Nels, Actually, wood is not a very expensive material here in Norway compared to other things.
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 5, 2009
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            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Nels" <arvent@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "svagene" <svagene@> wrote:
            > > Nels,
            > > "
            > > The word "Kryssfinèr" is the Norwegian word for "plywood",
            > > and "plater" is the word for "sheet". "Lauan-Meranti" is the
            name of
            > > the wood it self, I believe this is a kind of lower-quality wood.
            > > I've seen on some other forums that they recommend against using
            > > Meranti (which is a sort of fast-growing pine), since it often
            > > contains voids and air inside the sheets.
            > >
            > > I use Marine quality Okoume plywood in what is known as a BS
            1088-
            > > standard.
            > >
            > > As for plywood, I'm all set for my Mayfly, it's 3 sheets of 1/4"
            and
            > > 2 sheets of 1/2".
            > >
            > > Have a nice day!
            > >
            > > Sig
            >
            > Thanks Sig,
            >
            > I believe there is some meranti that is BS1088 certified - but I
            doubt
            > this was it - based on the price mentioned. Here is a quote from
            the
            > person who inquired.
            >
            >
            > 2'x4' is called Justert (adjusted) K-virke C-18, 48x098mm I
            > guess. It cost kr.16,90 per length meter.
            >
            >
            >
            > Plywood is Kryssfinèr Lauan-Meranti plater (sheets) ("as used
            > commonly in building houses in America," the guy said):
            >
            > All are 122x244 (I guess that is CM in this case)
            >
            >
            >
            > Thicknesses as follows: 6mm=kr.189
            >
            > 9mm=kr.289
            >
            > 12mm=kr.369
            >
            > 15mm=kr.459
            >
            > 22mm=kr.679
            >
            > This from an American lady now living near Drammen.
            >
            > 2X4 "adjusted price" is about $3/ft USD - so I can see why you
            don't
            > want to buy more than you require!
            >
            >
            > Nels
            >
            >
            >

            Nels,

            Actually, wood is not a very expensive material here in Norway
            compared to other things. (Everything else is though, pint of beer =
            $10, gallon of gas = $9.50)

            A price of 16.90kr per length meter equals to about $2.20 per meter
            or about $0.70 per foot. I have no idea what the prices are in USA
            though :-)

            Real marine plywood however, is VERY expensive. For the top quality
            stuff I bought, I paid about $1000 for 5 sheets, 2*1/2" and 3*1/4".

            Sig
          • Nels
            ... The NOK has dropped in value from the last time I was there 4 years ago. I live in BC Canada and can often get construction grade SPF (Spruce/pine/fir)
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 6, 2009
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              --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "svagene" <svagene@...> wrote:

              > Nels,
              >
              > Actually, wood is not a very expensive material here in Norway
              > compared to other things. (Everything else is though, pint of beer =
              > $10, gallon of gas = $9.50)
              >
              > A price of 16.90kr per length meter equals to about $2.20 per meter
              > or about $0.70 per foot. I have no idea what the prices are in USA
              > though :-)
              >
              > Real marine plywood however, is VERY expensive. For the top quality
              > stuff I bought, I paid about $1000 for 5 sheets, 2*1/2" and 3*1/4".
              >
              > Sig

              The NOK has dropped in value from the last time I was there 4 years ago.

              I live in BC Canada and can often get "construction grade" SPF
              (Spruce/pine/fir) 2X4's for about that price and the yard I go to
              allows going through the pile - now they trust that I will re-stack it
              properly.

              But clear douglas-fir or spruce is very expensive. Clear meranti
              "mahogany" ironically is about the best buy and is really nice to work
              with.

              http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/meranti.htm

              I have advised the lady to purchase 1/2 sheet of that meranti plywood,
              cut off a piece and run it through the dish-washer a few times to see
              how it holds up. She asked about marine grade paint and the guy
              mentioned 2-part epoxy porch and deck enamel would work if the boat
              was stored ashore. What do you think of that idea?

              I imagine epoxy is quite pricey as well?

              Nels
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