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Robbsboat update.

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  • joe_mapango
    Hello All. I got a chance to work on my Robbsbost project today. When I started this morning I had the basic bulkheads cut out. Today, I finished drafting
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 27 4:45 PM
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      Hello All. I got a chance to work on my Robbsbost project today.
      When I started this morning I had the basic bulkheads cut out. Today,
      I finished drafting the inside lines, and made up the fancy round
      inside corners in the bulkheads that get them. I then used my trusty
      cordless circular saw and cut out the insides. I followed up by
      finishing the fancy inside corners with a jigsaw. I have no
      intention of making a museum piece out of this boat, but after making
      so many mistakes with my philsboat, I'm trying to do better. So
      after cutting out the insides, I used my 30+ year old free router with
      1/4 round bit and rounded all the inside cuts. It gave the bulkheads
      a nice smooth feeling inside and now sanding will be minimal.

      After that was all done, I started cutting out all the bulkhead logs.
      Due to not having an ideal flat surface for all the bulkheads, I'll
      have to glue the logs on one at a time (mostly!). I went ahead and
      cut all the logs I'll need oversize and put them with each bulkhead.
      Another thing I'm doing differently, is all the bulkheads are cut
      oversize. After the logs are glued, I'll do the bevel cuts. To some
      that would be obvious, but the when I built philsboat it was not.
      This time, cutting the bevel will be much cleaner.

      Lastly, I screwed and glued the temporary bulkhead that sits in the
      cabin/cockpit to hold everything apart.

      I'm hoping to get some more bulkhead gluing done tomorrow, but I wont
      end up getting them all done. I'm using weldwood glue (a bit like
      regular carpenters glue) because I have it. If I had enough 5
      minute epoxy, I'd use that so I could get more done, but I don't. Out
      in the sticks where I live, you cant buy epoxy in anything but really
      small tubes.

      I expect to have all the bulkheads done next week, and possibly be
      able to go 3D. That is when things will get interesting. I'm
      thinking about using a sanding sealer and sealing the interior of the
      sides, and finishing all the bulkheads. I'm thinking about doing
      this, so when I'm ready to paint the interior, I'll just have to
      fillet the joints, sand and seal them, and then just paint. I'm
      thinking this will make the interior easier to paint, due to the fact
      that I don't really like sanding too much.

      Do any of you think this is a good plan?

      What brand/type of sanding sealer would you use?

      Chris Curtis
    • PAUL DELORY
      Joe: I found something at Home Depot and I understand they have it at Lowe s too. A varnish substitute that upon inspection of the packaging appears to be 1:1
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 29 5:49 AM
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        Joe: I found something at Home Depot and I understand they have it at Lowe's too. A varnish
        substitute that upon inspection of the packaging appears to be 1:1 ratio epoxy. My local HD had it at @ $20.00 quart and Lowe's at about $17.00 quart. Last year I purchased a quart of the same ratio epoxy at the yacht repair place and it was $40.00 quart. So, as I believe Dave Carnell said "epoxy is epoxy, the real difference is in the hardeners". I haven't had a chance to use it yet, but am planning to try it tonight. I will let you know if seems to perform like the Yacht shop "Everlast" expoy.
        BubbaP



        To: Michalak@yahoogroups.comFrom: ccurtis-keyword-sailboat.a927b9@...: Sat, 27 Sep 2008 23:45:33 +0000Subject: [Michalak] Robbsboat update.




        Hello All. I got a chance to work on my Robbsbost project today. When I started this morning I had the basic bulkheads cut out. Today,I finished drafting the inside lines, and made up the fancy roundinside corners in the bulkheads that get them. I then used my trustycordless circular saw and cut out the insides. I followed up byfinishing the fancy inside corners with a jigsaw. I have nointention of making a museum piece out of this boat, but after makingso many mistakes with my philsboat, I'm trying to do better. Soafter cutting out the insides, I used my 30+ year old free router with1/4 round bit and rounded all the inside cuts. It gave the bulkheadsa nice smooth feeling inside and now sanding will be minimal. After that was all done, I started cutting out all the bulkhead logs.Due to not having an ideal flat surface for all the bulkheads, I'llhave to glue the logs on one at a time (mostly!). I went ahead andcut all the logs I'll need oversize and put them with each bulkhead. Another thing I'm doing differently, is all the bulkheads are cutoversize. After the logs are glued, I'll do the bevel cuts. To somethat would be obvious, but the when I built philsboat it was not. This time, cutting the bevel will be much cleaner. Lastly, I screwed and glued the temporary bulkhead that sits in thecabin/cockpit to hold everything apart.I'm hoping to get some more bulkhead gluing done tomorrow, but I wontend up getting them all done. I'm using weldwood glue (a bit likeregular carpenters glue) because I have it. If I had enough 5minute epoxy, I'd use that so I could get more done, but I don't. Outin the sticks where I live, you cant buy epoxy in anything but reallysmall tubes. I expect to have all the bulkheads done next week, and possibly beable to go 3D. That is when things will get interesting. I'mthinking about using a sanding sealer and sealing the interior of thesides, and finishing all the bulkheads. I'm thinking about doingthis, so when I'm ready to paint the interior, I'll just have tofillet the joints, sand and seal them, and then just paint. I'mthinking this will make the interior easier to paint, due to the factthat I don't really like sanding too much.Do any of you think this is a good plan?What brand/type of sanding sealer would you use?Chris Curtis





        _________________________________________________________________
        See how Windows connects the people, information, and fun that are part of your life.
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • joe_mapango
        Thanks Paul. I actually don t want to epoxy the interior. I just want to paint it. Normal paint seems to get hairy on unprepared wood. So, I was asking
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 29 8:32 AM
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          Thanks Paul. I actually don't want to epoxy the interior. I just
          want to paint it. Normal paint seems to get "hairy" on unprepared
          wood. So, I was asking for advice on what sealer would be a good
          choice. I'm just trying to minimize how much time I need to spend
          twisted up in really small spaces painting the interior.

          My thinking is, if I prep the wood right, then painting the interior
          will be easier. I have not done this yet, so I'm hoping to glean
          wisdom from a wiser person!

          Chris Curtis

          P.S. Joe mapango is a derogatory nickname given to me by my beloved
          siblings when we were growing up. It translates to Joe "toothless
          Ape" in Swahili!


          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, PAUL DELORY <PAULDELORY@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Joe: I found something at Home Depot and I understand they have it
          at Lowe's too. A varnish
          > substitute that upon inspection of the packaging appears to be 1:1
          ratio epoxy. My local HD had it at @ $20.00 quart and Lowe's at about
          $17.00 quart. Last year I purchased a quart of the same ratio epoxy
          at the yacht repair place and it was $40.00 quart. So, as I believe
          Dave Carnell said "epoxy is epoxy, the real difference is in the
          hardeners". I haven't had a chance to use it yet, but am planning to
          try it tonight. I will let you know if seems to perform like the
          Yacht shop "Everlast" expoy.
          > BubbaP
          >
          >
          >
          > To: Michalak@...: ccurtis-keyword-sailboat.a927b9@...: Sat, 27 Sep
          2008 23:45:33 +0000Subject: [Michalak] Robbsboat update.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Hello All. I got a chance to work on my Robbsbost project today.
          When I started this morning I had the basic bulkheads cut out. Today,I
          finished drafting the inside lines, and made up the fancy roundinside
          corners in the bulkheads that get them. I then used my trustycordless
          circular saw and cut out the insides. I followed up byfinishing the
          fancy inside corners with a jigsaw. I have nointention of making a
          museum piece out of this boat, but after makingso many mistakes with
          my philsboat, I'm trying to do better. Soafter cutting out the
          insides, I used my 30+ year old free router with1/4 round bit and
          rounded all the inside cuts. It gave the bulkheadsa nice smooth
          feeling inside and now sanding will be minimal. After that was all
          done, I started cutting out all the bulkhead logs.Due to not having an
          ideal flat surface for all the bulkheads, I'llhave to glue the logs on
          one at a time (mostly!). I went ahead andcut all the logs I'll need
          oversize and put them with each bulkhead. Another thing I'm doing
          differently, is all the bulkheads are cutoversize. After the logs are
          glued, I'll do the bevel cuts. To somethat would be obvious, but the
          when I built philsboat it was not. This time, cutting the bevel will
          be much cleaner. Lastly, I screwed and glued the temporary bulkhead
          that sits in thecabin/cockpit to hold everything apart.I'm hoping to
          get some more bulkhead gluing done tomorrow, but I wontend up getting
          them all done. I'm using weldwood glue (a bit likeregular carpenters
          glue) because I have it. If I had enough 5minute epoxy, I'd use that
          so I could get more done, but I don't. Outin the sticks where I live,
          you cant buy epoxy in anything but reallysmall tubes. I expect to have
          all the bulkheads done next week, and possibly beable to go 3D. That
          is when things will get interesting. I'mthinking about using a sanding
          sealer and sealing the interior of thesides, and finishing all the
          bulkheads. I'm thinking about doingthis, so when I'm ready to paint
          the interior, I'll just have tofillet the joints, sand and seal them,
          and then just paint. I'mthinking this will make the interior easier to
          paint, due to the factthat I don't really like sanding too much.Do any
          of you think this is a good plan?What brand/type of sanding sealer
          would you use?Chris Curtis
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > _________________________________________________________________
          > See how Windows connects the people, information, and fun that are
          part of your life.
          > http://clk.atdmt.com/MRT/go/msnnkwxp1020093175mrt/direct/01/
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Nels
          ... Hey Joe I haven t tried this yet, but is what I plan to try.Like you I want to stay away from epoxy as much as possible. This is probably the best primer
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 29 9:21 AM
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            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "joe_mapango"
            <ccurtis-keyword-sailboat.a927b9@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks Paul. I actually don't want to epoxy the interior. I just
            > want to paint it. Normal paint seems to get "hairy" on unprepared
            > wood. So, I was asking for advice on what sealer would be a good
            > choice. I'm just trying to minimize how much time I need to spend
            > twisted up in really small spaces painting the interior.
            >
            > My thinking is, if I prep the wood right, then painting the interior
            > will be easier. I have not done this yet, so I'm hoping to glean
            > wisdom from a wiser person!
            >
            > Chris Curtis

            Hey Joe

            I haven't tried this yet, but is what I plan to try.Like you I want to
            stay away from epoxy as much as possible.

            This is probably the best primer sealer available and ain't cheap but
            you won't need much on a boat this size. If you tint it you may not
            even have to use paint on the interior.

            http://www.ximbonder.com/products_detail.asp?id=33

            I also plan to finish the panels on the inside before assembly. Do you
            see any problems with that? Edge all the glue lines with blue masking
            tape. If you do need two coats - you have to sand a bit between - and
            easier to sand separate flat panels.

            Nels
          • PAUL DELORY
            Actually I thinking you could make glue out of it. To: Michalak@yahoogroups.comFrom: ccurtis-keyword-sailboat.a927b9@mval.netDate: Mon, 29 Sep 2008 15:32:52
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 29 10:39 AM
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              Actually I thinking you could make glue out of it.




              To: Michalak@yahoogroups.comFrom: ccurtis-keyword-sailboat.a927b9@...: Mon, 29 Sep 2008 15:32:52 +0000Subject: [Michalak] Re: Robbsboat update.




              Thanks Paul. I actually don't want to epoxy the interior. I justwant to paint it. Normal paint seems to get "hairy" on unpreparedwood. So, I was asking for advice on what sealer would be a goodchoice. I'm just trying to minimize how much time I need to spendtwisted up in really small spaces painting the interior.My thinking is, if I prep the wood right, then painting the interiorwill be easier. I have not done this yet, so I'm hoping to gleanwisdom from a wiser person!Chris CurtisP.S. Joe mapango is a derogatory nickname given to me by my belovedsiblings when we were growing up. It translates to Joe "toothlessApe" in Swahili! --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, PAUL DELORY <PAULDELORY@...> wrote:>> > Joe: I found something at Home Depot and I understand they have itat Lowe's too. A varnish > substitute that upon inspection of the packaging appears to be 1:1ratio epoxy. My local HD had it at @ $20.00 quart and Lowe's at about$17.00 quart. Last year I purchased a quart of the same ratio epoxyat the yacht repair place and it was $40.00 quart. So, as I believeDave Carnell said "epoxy is epoxy, the real difference is in thehardeners". I haven't had a chance to use it yet, but am planning totry it tonight. I will let you know if seems to perform like theYacht shop "Everlast" expoy.> BubbaP> > > > To: Michalak@...: ccurtis-keyword-sailboat.a927b9@...: Sat, 27 Sep2008 23:45:33 +0000Subject: [Michalak] Robbsboat update.> > > > > Hello All. I got a chance to work on my Robbsbost project today.When I started this morning I had the basic bulkheads cut out. Today,Ifinished drafting the inside lines, and made up the fancy roundinsidecorners in the bulkheads that get them. I then used my trustycordlesscircular saw and cut out the insides. I followed up byfinishing thefancy inside corners with a jigsaw. I have nointention of making amuseum piece out of this boat, but after makingso many mistakes withmy philsboat, I'm trying to do better. Soafter cutting out theinsides, I used my 30+ year old free router with1/4 round bit androunded all the inside cuts. It gave the bulkheadsa nice smoothfeeling inside and now sanding will be minimal. After that was alldone, I started cutting out all the bulkhead logs.Due to not having anideal flat surface for all the bulkheads, I'llhave to glue the logs onone at a time (mostly!). I went ahead andcut all the logs I'll needoversize and put them with each bulkhead. Another thing I'm doingdifferently, is all the bulkheads are cutoversize. After the logs areglued, I'll do the bevel cuts. To somethat would be obvious, but thewhen I built philsboat it was not. This time, cutting the bevel willbe much cleaner. Lastly, I screwed and glued the temporary bulkheadthat sits in thecabin/cockpit to hold everything apart.I'm hoping toget some more bulkhead gluing done tomorrow, but I wontend up gettingthem all done. I'm using weldwood glue (a bit likeregular carpentersglue) because I have it. If I had enough 5minute epoxy, I'd use thatso I could get more done, but I don't. Outin the sticks where I live,you cant buy epoxy in anything but reallysmall tubes. I expect to haveall the bulkheads done next week, and possibly beable to go 3D. Thatis when things will get interesting. I'mthinking about using a sandingsealer and sealing the interior of thesides, and finishing all thebulkheads. I'm thinking about doingthis, so when I'm ready to paintthe interior, I'll just have tofillet the joints, sand and seal them,and then just paint. I'mthinking this will make the interior easier topaint, due to the factthat I don't really like sanding too much.Do anyof you think this is a good plan?What brand/type of sanding sealerwould you use?Chris Curtis > > > > > > __________________________________________________________> See how Windows connects the people, information, and fun that arepart of your life.> http://clk.atdmt.com/MRT/go/msnnkwxp1020093175mrt/direct/01/> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]>





              _________________________________________________________________
              See how Windows connects the people, information, and fun that are part of your life.
              http://clk.atdmt.com/MRT/go/msnnkwxp1020093175mrt/direct/01/

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Nels
              ... Good thought and worth a try - what s it called? Nels
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 29 12:27 PM
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                --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, PAUL DELORY <PAULDELORY@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Actually I thinking you could make glue out of it.

                Good thought and worth a try - what's it called?

                Nels
              • Lincoln Ross
                Suggest that, if you re going to use some kind of primer or sanding sealer on the inside, that you mask off the area that will have fillets or any other
                Message 7 of 8 , Sep 30 7:26 PM
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                  Suggest that, if you're going to use some kind of primer or sanding
                  sealer on the inside, that you mask off the area that will have fillets
                  or any other structural attachment. Also suggest that epoxy really is a
                  good primer, at least if you wash off the blush or only work in warm,
                  dry weather. Latex paint seems to stick to it nicely. Plus, no masking
                  will be required. Best bond occurs if you can glue to it within two or
                  three days, depending on temperature. I wouldn't use 5 minute epoxy for
                  anything important on a boat. The slow curing stuff is better. Although
                  it's been a few years, I used Raka epoxy to build my boat and was quite
                  happy with it You can tailor the mix for the temperature. It's fairly
                  thin so it wets out cloth ok. If you need glue, you can mix in wood
                  flour, fumed silica, etc. . If you're going to prime with epoxy, it's a
                  good idea to warm up the wood first or else work when temperatures are
                  dropping. Or you can just hit it with a heat gun immediately. This way
                  the warm air bubbles out, things cool off, and then the epoxy is drawn
                  in instead of having bubbles come up through it.
                • joe_mapango
                  Thanks for your comments Lincoln. I had planned to mask off the chine and bulkhead areas first. I m just trying to do what I can before the boat gets glued
                  Message 8 of 8 , Sep 30 8:40 PM
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                    Thanks for your comments Lincoln.

                    I had planned to mask off the chine and bulkhead areas first. I'm
                    just trying to do what I can before the boat gets glued 3D. Anything
                    to make it easier on my 47 year old frame! Nels suggested some
                    primer, but it is not available locally, and at 40+ a gallon I'm not
                    really interested in shipping it! Another person suggsted I use Kilz
                    primer. I remember using that stuff years ago in a bathroom in
                    Maryland. It painted right over some mold and was a great base.
                    Possibly someone could comment on that if they know.

                    As a general rule I don't use 5 minute epoxy either, but this boat is
                    so overbuilt, WAY overbuilt, I would have used it on my inner
                    bulkheads to save time. I ended up using a mixture of Resoursnal and
                    Titebond wood glue (not at the same time!). All places I could
                    control the joint with no gaps and plenty of clamping pressure.

                    I have about a gallon of non thickened epoxy left over from another
                    boat project and some 11oz cloth. I'm hoping it will be enough to
                    finish the sides and bottom of the boat! I'm possibly deluding
                    myself, but I'm good at that ;"

                    Thanks again for your comments!


                    Chris Curtis

                    --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Lincoln Ross <lincolnr@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Suggest that, if you're going to use some kind of primer or sanding
                    > sealer on the inside, that you mask off the area that will have fillets
                    > or any other structural attachment. Also suggest that epoxy really is a
                    > good primer, at least if you wash off the blush or only work in warm,
                    > dry weather. Latex paint seems to stick to it nicely. Plus, no masking
                    > will be required. Best bond occurs if you can glue to it within two or
                    > three days, depending on temperature. I wouldn't use 5 minute epoxy
                    for
                    > anything important on a boat. The slow curing stuff is better. Although
                    > it's been a few years, I used Raka epoxy to build my boat and was quite
                    > happy with it You can tailor the mix for the temperature. It's fairly
                    > thin so it wets out cloth ok. If you need glue, you can mix in wood
                    > flour, fumed silica, etc. . If you're going to prime with epoxy, it's a
                    > good idea to warm up the wood first or else work when temperatures are
                    > dropping. Or you can just hit it with a heat gun immediately. This way
                    > the warm air bubbles out, things cool off, and then the epoxy is drawn
                    > in instead of having bubbles come up through it.
                    >
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