Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

AF3 motor refit - beefing up the transom?

Expand Messages
  • Frank San Miguel
    I built my AF3, Creamcheese, for sailing on desert and mountain lakes in the west. For those locations, oars were a perfect mode auxiliary of power. I have
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 1, 2008
      I built my AF3, Creamcheese, for sailing on desert and mountain lakes
      in the west. For those locations, oars were a perfect mode auxiliary
      of power. I have since relocated to the East Coast and haven't sailed
      her much lately because the tides are a little too strong here in the
      Upper Chesapeake Bay (2-3mph at times). It is too inconvenient to
      schedule my sailing around the lunar cycles.

      After a lot of power-boating in the past few years(Bolger Cabin Clam
      Skiff), I'm getting the itch to go sailing again and want to put a
      little 4-cyc 2hp on Creamcheese (I'll probably sell my old British
      Seagull on ebay). I'm planning to use a swing-up motor bracket
      mounted to the port side of the transom.

      I built my transom as designed, which isn't sufficient for a motor.
      I'm considering my options for how to strengthen it. Max beefed his
      up by using 5/8 ply.

      Does anyone have any suggestions?

      David Cassidy, I've been following your AF3 progress with pleasure.
      It looks great! How did you strengthen the transom?

      Thanks,

      Frank
      http://www.fsanmiguel.com/boat
    • Rob Rohde-Szudy
      I d stick with the seagull, myself. They have a 4:1 reduction gear, which is twice the ratio you ll find on any other high thrust outboard. This means a
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 1, 2008
        I'd stick with the seagull, myself. They have a 4:1 reduction gear, which is twice the ratio you'll find on any other "high thrust" outboard. This means a bigger prop and a LOT more thrust at the speeds relevant to a sailboat. With tides, I'd want that thrust. Consider hanging onto it. (Otherwise let us know when you post it to Ebay!) Don't let its age worry you. With some maintenance they can last a very, very long time.

        As for the transom, I'd go with what Max did. It worked well. Though if you're going to use a metal bracket you could probably just add framing lumber where it bolts on and skip the plywood. Just make sure there's MORE framing lumber in front of it, screwed to the sides or wales to transfer the force to the hull more broadly. Just remember that the strongest parts are the chines and wales, then get the motor's force transferred to them and you'll be fine.

        Best, --Rob


        AF3 motor refit - beefing up the transom?
        Posted by: "Frank San Miguel" sanmi@... sanmi
        Date: Sun Jun 1, 2008 5:24 am ((PDT))


        I built my AF3, Creamcheese, for sailing on desert and mountain lakes
        in the west. For those locations, oars were a perfect mode auxiliary
        of power. I have since relocated to the East Coast and haven't sailed
        her much lately because the tides are a little too strong here in the
        Upper Chesapeake Bay (2-3mph at times). It is too inconvenient to
        schedule my sailing around the lunar cycles.

        After a lot of power-boating in the past few years(Bolger Cabin Clam
        Skiff), I'm getting the itch to go sailing again and want to put a
        little 4-cyc 2hp on Creamcheese (I'll probably sell my old British
        Seagull on ebay). I'm planning to use a swing-up motor bracket
        mounted to the port side of the transom.

        I built my transom as designed, which isn't sufficient for a motor.
        I'm considering my options for how to strengthen it. Max beefed his
        up by using 5/8 ply.

        Does anyone have any suggestions?

        David Cassidy, I've been following your AF3 progress with pleasure.
        It looks great! How did you strengthen the transom?

        Thanks,

        Frank
        http://www.fsanmiguel.com/boat




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • vexatious2001
        ... gear, which is twice the ratio you ll find on any other high thrust outboard. This means a bigger prop and a LOT more thrust at the speeds relevant to a
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 1, 2008
          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Rob Rohde-Szudy <robrohdeszudy@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I'd stick with the seagull, myself. They have a 4:1 reduction
          gear, which is twice the ratio you'll find on any other "high
          thrust" outboard. This means a bigger prop and a LOT more thrust at
          the speeds relevant to a sailboat. With tides, I'd want that thrust.
          Consider hanging onto it. (Otherwise let us know when you post it to
          Ebay!) Don't let its age worry you. With some maintenance they can
          last a very, very long time.





          I don't know what horsepower the Seagull is but there is a lot
          to be said for using what you already have. It sure does not
          take much h.p. to push an AF3; I used an old 2 hp and almost
          never went over 1/2 throttle.




          >
          > As for the transom, I'd go with what Max did. It worked well.
          Though if you're going to use a metal bracket you could probably
          just add framing lumber where it bolts on and skip the plywood. Just
          make sure there's MORE framing lumber in front of it, screwed to the
          sides or wales to transfer the force to the hull more broadly. Just
          remember that the strongest parts are the chines and wales, then get
          the motor's force transferred to them and you'll be fine.







          I would probably add a backing pad of plywood (say 1/2 inch or so)
          on the inside of the transom where the bracket bolts, and put
          some framing inside the "lazarette" to tie that pad into
          the bulkhead ahead of the transom.

          Also, an outboard mounted to one side of an AF3 is in danger of
          dunking in a capsize. I would give some thought to re-mounting
          the rudder off to one side so that the motor can be mounted
          closer to the center of the transom.

          A lifting bracket heps with the vertical positioning
          of the engine; When you are sitting on the back deck
          and the stern is down, you don't want the powerhead to
          submerge, but when you go forward into the slot, the transom
          can raise quite a bit, pulling the prop and water intake out
          of the water.



          Max
        • Frank San Miguel
          ... which is twice the ratio you ll find on any other high thrust outboard. This means a bigger prop and a LOT more thrust at the speeds relevant to a
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 2, 2008
            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Rob Rohde-Szudy <robrohdeszudy@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I'd stick with the seagull, myself. They have a 4:1 reduction gear,
            which is twice the ratio you'll find on any other "high thrust"
            outboard. This means a bigger prop and a LOT more thrust at the speeds
            relevant to a sailboat. With tides, I'd want that thrust. Consider
            hanging onto it. (Otherwise let us know when you post it to Ebay!)
            Don't let its age worry you. With some maintenance they can last a
            very, very long time.

            This particular seagull has been in my family since the mid 1960's so
            it has some emotional value, and I do like the low gear ratio.
            However, I'd also like something that has a clutch and is cleaner and
            quieter. If I sell it, I post a note to the forum.

            >
            > As for the transom, I'd go with what Max did. It worked well. Though
            if you're going to use a metal bracket you could probably just add
            framing lumber where it bolts on and skip the plywood. Just make sure
            there's MORE framing lumber in front of it, screwed to the sides or
            wales to transfer the force to the hull more broadly. Just remember
            that the strongest parts are the chines and wales, then get the
            motor's force transferred to them and you'll be fine.

            Thanks for the suggestions!

            Frank

            >
            > Best, --Rob
            >
            >
            > AF3 motor refit - beefing up the transom?
            > Posted by: "Frank San Miguel" sanmi@... sanmi
            > Date: Sun Jun 1, 2008 5:24 am ((PDT))
            >
            >
            > I built my AF3, Creamcheese, for sailing on desert and mountain lakes
            > in the west. For those locations, oars were a perfect mode auxiliary
            > of power. I have since relocated to the East Coast and haven't sailed
            > her much lately because the tides are a little too strong here in the
            > Upper Chesapeake Bay (2-3mph at times). It is too inconvenient to
            > schedule my sailing around the lunar cycles.
            >
            > After a lot of power-boating in the past few years(Bolger Cabin Clam
            > Skiff), I'm getting the itch to go sailing again and want to put a
            > little 4-cyc 2hp on Creamcheese (I'll probably sell my old British
            > Seagull on ebay). I'm planning to use a swing-up motor bracket
            > mounted to the port side of the transom.
            >
            > I built my transom as designed, which isn't sufficient for a motor.
            > I'm considering my options for how to strengthen it. Max beefed his
            > up by using 5/8 ply.
            >
            > Does anyone have any suggestions?
            >
            > David Cassidy, I've been following your AF3 progress with pleasure.
            > It looks great! How did you strengthen the transom?
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > Frank
            > http://www.fsanmiguel.com/boat
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Frank San Miguel
            Max, Thanks for your suggestions. I enjoyed reading about your AF3 in duckworks, including the motor mount article. My main complaints with the seagull are
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 2, 2008
              Max,

              Thanks for your suggestions. I enjoyed reading about your AF3 in
              duckworks, including the motor mount article. My main complaints with
              the seagull are what it does to the environment and the noise.

              If I do this refit, I'll definitely go with a lifting bracket.

              Frank
              Landenberg, PA


              --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "vexatious2001" <cadbury112@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Rob Rohde-Szudy <robrohdeszudy@>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > I'd stick with the seagull, myself. They have a 4:1 reduction
              > gear, which is twice the ratio you'll find on any other "high
              > thrust" outboard. This means a bigger prop and a LOT more thrust at
              > the speeds relevant to a sailboat. With tides, I'd want that thrust.
              > Consider hanging onto it. (Otherwise let us know when you post it to
              > Ebay!) Don't let its age worry you. With some maintenance they can
              > last a very, very long time.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > I don't know what horsepower the Seagull is but there is a lot
              > to be said for using what you already have. It sure does not
              > take much h.p. to push an AF3; I used an old 2 hp and almost
              > never went over 1/2 throttle.
              >
              >

              >
              >
              > >
              > > As for the transom, I'd go with what Max did. It worked well.
              > Though if you're going to use a metal bracket you could probably
              > just add framing lumber where it bolts on and skip the plywood. Just
              > make sure there's MORE framing lumber in front of it, screwed to the
              > sides or wales to transfer the force to the hull more broadly. Just
              > remember that the strongest parts are the chines and wales, then get
              > the motor's force transferred to them and you'll be fine.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > I would probably add a backing pad of plywood (say 1/2 inch or so)
              > on the inside of the transom where the bracket bolts, and put
              > some framing inside the "lazarette" to tie that pad into
              > the bulkhead ahead of the transom.
              >
              > Also, an outboard mounted to one side of an AF3 is in danger of
              > dunking in a capsize. I would give some thought to re-mounting
              > the rudder off to one side so that the motor can be mounted
              > closer to the center of the transom.
              >
              > A lifting bracket heps with the vertical positioning
              > of the engine; When you are sitting on the back deck
              > and the stern is down, you don't want the powerhead to
              > submerge, but when you go forward into the slot, the transom
              > can raise quite a bit, pulling the prop and water intake out
              > of the water.
              >
              >
              >
              > Max
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.