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Re: Gulf Cruising and Jewelbox Jr

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  • GarthAB
    ... I coulda sworn Rick Bedard wrote somewhere about how JB Jr. handles chop. But after about five minutes of searching this group s messages, and searching
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 4, 2008
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      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "hawkinsamps" <hawkinsamps@...> wrote:
      > I'm leaning towards the JB jr , but my only reservation is ; how does
      > it handle chop or rough water ?


      I coulda sworn Rick Bedard wrote somewhere about how JB Jr. handles
      chop. But after about five minutes of searching this group's messages,
      and searching Duckworks, I haven't found what I thought I remembered.
      Anyway, the gist of my (possibly illusory) memory is: if you sail it
      heeled over a bit it presents a V to the waves, and does surprisingly
      well.

      He also wrote about his technique for rigging a bridle to hold the
      boat at anchor at an angle to the waves to eliminate wave-slap. Back
      in August-September 2007 we had a great go-round of questions and
      answers about JB Jr.

      Search for "sctree" in this group -- it'll bring up all Rick's
      postings. Also, check out
      http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/03/r/outings/peaches/ and do a quick
      Google search of the Duckworks site for his other articles. It's hard
      to read them and not begin immediately building a JB Jr.

      Garth
      (still just in the dreaming-of-JB-Jr phase, watching the rain fall and
      melt our snow)
    • hawkinsamps
      Thanks Garth , Did the sctree search here on the board . Haven t read it all , but I m sold . I read the Peaches article on Duckworks a couple days ago and
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 4, 2008
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        Thanks Garth ,

        Did the sctree search here on the board . Haven't read it all , but
        I'm sold . I read the "Peaches" article on Duckworks a couple days ago
        and really enjoyed it .

        Chad

        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "GarthAB" <garth@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "hawkinsamps" <hawkinsamps@> wrote:
        > > I'm leaning towards the JB jr , but my only reservation is ; how does
        > > it handle chop or rough water ?
        >
        >
        > I coulda sworn Rick Bedard wrote somewhere about how JB Jr. handles
        > chop. But after about five minutes of searching this group's messages,
        > and searching Duckworks, I haven't found what I thought I remembered.
        > Anyway, the gist of my (possibly illusory) memory is: if you sail it
        > heeled over a bit it presents a V to the waves, and does surprisingly
        > well.
        >
        > He also wrote about his technique for rigging a bridle to hold the
        > boat at anchor at an angle to the waves to eliminate wave-slap. Back
        > in August-September 2007 we had a great go-round of questions and
        > answers about JB Jr.
        >
        > Search for "sctree" in this group -- it'll bring up all Rick's
        > postings. Also, check out
        > http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/03/r/outings/peaches/ and do a quick
        > Google search of the Duckworks site for his other articles. It's hard
        > to read them and not begin immediately building a JB Jr.
        >
        > Garth
        > (still just in the dreaming-of-JB-Jr phase, watching the rain fall and
        > melt our snow)
        >
      • Alan
        See MSG#12472...That the one? also 12428 100 nights some sort of record? Lots of others around then as you said. Alan. ... does ... messages, ... remembered.
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 4, 2008
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          See MSG#12472...That the one?
          also 12428 "100 nights" some sort of record?
          Lots of others around then as you said.
          Alan.

          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "GarthAB" <garth@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "hawkinsamps" <hawkinsamps@> wrote:
          > > I'm leaning towards the JB jr , but my only reservation is ; how
          does
          > > it handle chop or rough water ?
          >
          >
          > I coulda sworn Rick Bedard wrote somewhere about how JB Jr. handles
          > chop. But after about five minutes of searching this group's
          messages,
          > and searching Duckworks, I haven't found what I thought I
          remembered.
          > Anyway, the gist of my (possibly illusory) memory is: if you sail it
          > heeled over a bit it presents a V to the waves, and does
          surprisingly
          > well.
          >
          > He also wrote about his technique for rigging a bridle to hold the
          > boat at anchor at an angle to the waves to eliminate wave-slap. Back
          > in August-September 2007 we had a great go-round of questions and
          > answers about JB Jr.
          >
          > Search for "sctree" in this group -- it'll bring up all Rick's
          > postings. Also, check out
          > http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/03/r/outings/peaches/ and do a
          quick
          > Google search of the Duckworks site for his other articles. It's
          hard
          > to read them and not begin immediately building a JB Jr.
          >
          > Garth
          > (still just in the dreaming-of-JB-Jr phase, watching the rain fall
          and
          > melt our snow)
          >
        • vexatious2001
          ... I think I would move gear over to one side, and also swing the boom/sprit out to one side with a bucket of water or something on the end of it, to give the
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 5, 2008
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            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "GarthAB" <garth@...> wrote:
            >
            > He also wrote about his technique for rigging a bridle to hold the
            > boat at anchor at an angle to the waves to eliminate wave-slap.





            I think I would move gear over to one side, and also swing the
            boom/sprit out to one side with a bucket of water or something
            on the end of it, to give the boat some heel to help with
            the wave slap.



            Max
          • John Kohnen
            JB, Jr. is initially pretty tender. I like to sleep over in the starboard bilge so I can prop my pillow up against the aft bulkhead, and leave a space waddling
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 7, 2008
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              JB, Jr. is initially pretty tender. I like to sleep over in the starboard
              bilge so I can prop my pillow up against the aft bulkhead, and leave a
              space waddling (4' headroom <g>) to port. This heels the boat over a fair
              amount. So far, slapping at anchor hasn't kept me awake, but I haven't
              given it a good test yet. My roughest night was tied up at the end of a
              dock in St. Helens and the seas were coming from aft. Sage (an honorary
              steamboat that weekend) jumped around quite a bit, but I managed to sleep
              pretty well anyway...

              I know that heeling the boat doesn't eliminate being awakened in the
              middle of the night, though. Last September at the Port Townsend Wooden
              Boat Festival I was tied up at a sheltered piece of dock, but on both
              Friday and Saturday nights I was awakened by well intentioned (but well
              lubricated) passers by who thought Sage was sinking because she was heeled
              over! I think I'll make a big sign for next time -- "THIS BOAT ISN'T
              SINKING, I'M JUST TRYING TO SLEEP!" ;o)

              On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 18:30:13 -0800, Max wrote:

              > I think I would move gear over to one side, and also swing the
              > boom/sprit out to one side with a bucket of water or something
              > on the end of it, to give the boat some heel to help with
              > the wave slap.

              --
              John <jkohnen@...>
              School days, I believe, are the unhappiest in the whole span of
              human existence . They are full of dull, unintelligible tasks,
              new and unpleasant ordinances, brutal violations of common sense
              and common decency. <H. L. Mencken>
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