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Re: sink weight again

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  • Nels
    ... Hi Wojtek, I think the leeboard is held down and adjusted by using a rope tied to the top of the board and lead to what is called an Auto-release
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 1, 2007
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      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "wwbaginski" <wwbaginski@...> wrote:
      >
      > Now (making a leeboard) I'm surprised with no sink weight on a
      > leeboard in saiboats drawings. There's much more plywood than in
      > rudder blade. Do you mean leebord is not self-adjusting at all? How it
      > works in reality? Has anybody made sink weight on a leebord ?
      >
      > wojtek

      Hi Wojtek,

      I think the leeboard is held down and adjusted by using a rope tied to
      the top of the board and lead to what is called an "Auto-release
      Clamcleat."

      It is available at duckworks.

      <http://www.duckworksbbs.com/hardware/cleats/sd002570/index.htm>

      You might post your question at the discussion group there and Chuck
      might help you as that is what he has on his boat. Other than that
      there is no sink weight added to sink the board that I am aware of.

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/duckworks/

      What are you building now?

      Nels
    • wwbaginski
      ... How it ... tied to ... Chuck ... Hi Nels, thanks a lot for comments. I ve never seen this smart device before. I have to look for it in local stores. Looks
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 1, 2007
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        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Nels" <arvent@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "wwbaginski" <wwbaginski@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Now (making a leeboard) I'm surprised with no sink weight on a
        > > leeboard in saiboats drawings. There's much more plywood than in
        > > rudder blade. Do you mean leebord is not self-adjusting at all?
        How it
        > > works in reality? Has anybody made sink weight on a leebord ?
        > >
        > > wojtek
        >
        > Hi Wojtek,
        >
        > I think the leeboard is held down and adjusted by using a rope
        tied to
        > the top of the board and lead to what is called an "Auto-release
        > Clamcleat."
        >
        > It is available at duckworks.
        >
        > <http://www.duckworksbbs.com/hardware/cleats/sd002570/index.htm>
        >
        > You might post your question at the discussion group there and
        Chuck
        > might help you as that is what he has on his boat. Other than that
        > there is no sink weight added to sink the board that I am aware of.
        >
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/duckworks/
        >
        > What are you building now?
        >
        > Nels
        >

        Hi Nels, thanks a lot for comments. I've never seen this smart
        device before. I have to look for it in local stores. Looks that the
        same rope would work twice: for sinking a board, and another time to
        keep it off the water constantly. So it's even better that there's
        no sink weight on a leeboard.

        I'm rigging my polepunt (which is accidentaly presented in Jim's
        current newsletter)to get her sailing version ready for autumn river
        cruises. I've got drawings from Jim a year ago.

        wojtek
      • Rob Rohde-Szudy
        Hey Wojtek, I never had any trouble on mine with no hold-down at all. Most of the time the pressure of the boat against the water holds it down. If the axle
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 1, 2007
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          Hey Wojtek, I never had any trouble on mine with no hold-down at all. Most of the time the pressure of the boat against the water holds it down. If the axle bolt is loose it can float up when tacking or on a downwind run, but I kept it just snug enough that it would stay where I put it. Better to keep it light, I'd say.
          --Rob


          sink weight again
          Posted by: "wwbaginski" wwbaginski@... wwbaginski
          Date: Tue Jul 31, 2007 10:15 pm ((PDT))

          Now (making a leeboard) I'm surprised with no sink weight on a
          leeboard in saiboats drawings. There's much more plywood than in
          rudder blade. Do you mean leebord is not self-adjusting at all? How it
          works in reality? Has anybody made sink weight on a leebord ?

          wojtek



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        • Thomas Hamernik
          If I were to build another of Michalak s leeboards, I would add just enough lead to make it neutrally buoyant. ...
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 1, 2007
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            If I were to build another of Michalak's leeboards, I
            would add just enough lead to make it neutrally
            buoyant.


            --- Rob Rohde-Szudy <robrohdeszudy@...> wrote:

            > Hey Wojtek, I never had any trouble on mine with no
            > hold-down at all. Most of the time the pressure of
            > the boat against the water holds it down. If the
            > axle bolt is loose it can float up when tacking or
            > on a downwind run, but I kept it just snug enough
            > that it would stay where I put it. Better to keep it
            > light, I'd say.
            > --Rob
            >
            >
            > sink weight again
            > Posted by: "wwbaginski" wwbaginski@...
            > wwbaginski
            > Date: Tue Jul 31, 2007 10:15 pm ((PDT))
            >
            > Now (making a leeboard) I'm surprised with no sink
            > weight on a
            > leeboard in saiboats drawings. There's much more
            > plywood than in
            > rudder blade. Do you mean leebord is not
            > self-adjusting at all? How it
            > works in reality? Has anybody made sink weight on a
            > leebord ?
            >
            > wojtek
            >
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Be a better Heartthrob. Get better relationship
            > answers from someone who knows.
            > Yahoo! Answers - Check it out.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been
            > removed]
            >
            >



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          • Nels
            ... I would agree. Neutering your leeboard would make it more docile:-) Bolger s Dovekie was the boat that likely first exposed sailing folks in NA to the
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 1, 2007
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              --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Hamernik
              <awellbalancedgun@...> wrote:
              >
              > If I were to build another of Michalak's leeboards, I
              > would add just enough lead to make it neutrally
              > buoyant.
              >
              I would agree.

              Neutering your leeboard would make it more docile:-)

              Bolger's Dovekie was the boat that likely first exposed sailing folks
              in NA to the advantages of leeboards. The prototype version only had
              one deep leeboard and would out-sail the production version by a large
              margin according to PCB.

              The Dovekies used a friction device on the inside of the hull to
              adjust the tension on the axle bolts. With Chuck's solution the
              leeboard depth can be adjusted from the helm station. But having
              enough weight so that it naturally hangs vertically would seem to be
              an advantage.

              Jim Michalak has mentioned as well that the leeboard can be of great
              help when motoring into a cross-wind. You can dial in enough board to
              keep the boat tracking on course. This is also when you might consider
              sending the first mate below to tighten the tension on the axle - and
              have them stay there for balance:-)

              Nels
            • pgochnour@aol.com
              And if you don t need a lot of weight you can embed split shot lead sinkers or even bb shot in epoxy rather than casting lead ... less fuss and bother, maybe
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 1, 2007
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                And if you don't need a lot of weight you can embed split shot lead
                sinkers or even bb shot in epoxy rather than casting lead ... less fuss and
                bother, maybe less toxic....make a hole, bevel edges to form a key, pack in the
                shot, then pour epoxy...

                Tyson in Galveston.


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              • Nels
                ... lead ... fuss and ... pack in the ... ... or a section of steel plate laminated into the lower section? Nels
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 1, 2007
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                  --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, pgochnour@... wrote:
                  >
                  > And if you don't need a lot of weight you can embed split shot
                  lead
                  > sinkers or even bb shot in epoxy rather than casting lead ... less
                  fuss and
                  > bother, maybe less toxic....make a hole, bevel edges to form a key,
                  pack in the
                  > shot, then pour epoxy...
                  >
                  > Tyson in Galveston.

                  ... or a section of steel plate laminated into the lower section?

                  Nels
                • john h wright
                  Choosing the right material for sink weight for a wood lee or center board almost does not make any difference. Because it is replacing wood not displacing
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 1, 2007
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                    Choosing the right material for "sink weight" for a wood lee or center
                    board almost does not make any difference. Because it is replacing wood
                    not displacing water, any heaver material can be used including lead or
                    steel shot in an epoxy or polyester matrix. Lead (708 lb) Steel (495 lb)
                    Alum.(165 lb) Conc. (150 lb) per cubic foot. The limiting factors are
                    cost, ease of construction, structural, health, availability. Steel is a
                    good compromise except that it will rust given the chance. Any of these
                    materials can provide the same performance if constructed correctly.

                    Because a steel or lead bulb keel boat needs to move the weight as low as
                    possible, the material choice becomes important to performance because
                    the material used displaces water at 62 lbs (appx.) a cubic foot which
                    must be subtracted from the weight. 708-62=646 lb. net per cubic foot for
                    lead. Concrete 160-62=98 lb. net per cubic foot for concrete. Lead is
                    six times as effective. In that case lead is a much better choice.

                    I had an International 110 that had a cast steel bulb (key) keel that
                    must have weighted about 500 lb. It did not rust even keeping it in salt
                    water 360 days a year because it was in water and was painted. When it
                    was pulled out of the water it rusted quickly. I dropped the keel out
                    when I hauled it because I was worried about the bolts holding it on to
                    the boat. A couple of the bolts were almost gone.

                    John in Bastrop



                    I had a piece of 3/8"steel

                    On Wed, 01 Aug 2007 17:12:33 -0000 "Nels" <arvent@...> writes:
                    --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, pgochnour@... wrote:
                    >
                    > And if you don't need a lot of weight you can embed split shot
                    lead
                    > sinkers or even bb shot in epoxy rather than casting lead ... less
                    fuss and
                    > bother, maybe less toxic....make a hole, bevel edges to form a key,
                    pack in the
                    > shot, then pour epoxy...
                    >
                    > Tyson in Galveston.

                    ... or a section of steel plate laminated into the lower section?

                    Nels




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