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Re: Batto cover/deck for rough waters?

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  • Rob Rohde-Szudy
    Hey there. I too have Batto plans, but haven t done anything with them yet. My understanding is that you simply DON T reboard Batto. Don t fall out! On the
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 10 6:31 AM
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      Hey there. I too have Batto plans, but haven't done anything with them yet. My understanding is that you simply DON'T reboard Batto. Don't fall out! On the other hand, it is based on Pete Culler's "Otter". He lived in Maine, so I would think he would have rowed in some nasty stuff, but maybe someone from "Nooinglun" can elaborate? I do, however, remember that this boat demands expert handling and punishes mistakes sternly. So maybe it's like Chris said - you'll use the kayak when there are waves. I guess a deck doesn't help you much if you dump it and can't get back in. If I DID deck a Batto, I'd keep it very light. Maybe a cambered deck of 1/8" door skin.
      --Rob


      Batto cover/deck for rough waters?
      Posted by: "atukomeyer" atukomeyer@... atukomeyer
      Date: Tue Jul 10, 2007 1:58 am ((PDT))

      Aloha! I've had the plans for Batto for a while and been waiting for a
      chance to build it but I think I may have a problem. I was out in the
      waters I usually paddle with my kayak and while sloshing through the
      chop/waves I realized that Batto has low sides and would probably be
      taking on quite a bit of water if she was out here now. What can I do
      to keep the water out? Should I make a cockpit cover (tarp)or deck the
      rest of the boat? I choose Batto because I wanted something fast but
      light and easy enough to cartop and its low profile so I won't get
      blown around by the winds. Also, if you happen to flip, how do you get
      back in? Any suggestions are greatly appreciated. Mahalo, Atsuko



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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • adventures_in_astrophotography
      Hi Atsuko, ... a chance to build it but I think I may have a problem. I was out in ... do ... the ... get ... I row in high elevation lakes and reservoirs that
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 10 6:51 AM
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        Hi Atsuko,

        > Aloha! I've had the plans for Batto for a while and been waiting for
        a chance to build it but I think I may have a problem. I was out in
        > the
        > waters I usually paddle with my kayak and while sloshing through the
        > chop/waves I realized that Batto has low sides and would probably be
        > taking on quite a bit of water if she was out here now. What can I
        do
        > to keep the water out? Should I make a cockpit cover (tarp)or deck
        the
        > rest of the boat? I choose Batto because I wanted something fast but
        > light and easy enough to cartop and its low profile so I won't get
        > blown around by the winds. Also, if you happen to flip, how do you
        get
        > back in? Any suggestions are greatly appreciated. Mahalo, Atsuko

        I row in high elevation lakes and reservoirs that can get pretty rough
        quickly, so my problem is somewhat similar to yours. I looked at
        Batto, but eventually decided on Robote, partly because it has more
        beam and you can actually stand up in it, although clumsily because of
        the v-bottom. I'm sure Batto is faster than Robote, but Robote is
        plenty fast itself, and it can built just as light for cartopping.

        To make the boat drier and hopefully allow me to re-enter if I was
        knocked overboard, I decked the ends and installed 1/4-turn hatches.
        I keep a bailing scoop in one compartment, but so far I have not had
        to use it. Robote is actually quite good in rough water (rough by my
        standards) thanks to the v-bottom, and I've never taken more that a
        few drops of spray aboard, even rowing into a stiff wind. One guy
        actually rowed an undecked Robote in the Blackburn Challenge, an ocean
        rowing race around Cape Ann in Massachusetts. BTW, I think the sharp
        v-bottom also allows straighter tracking in crosswinds.

        A couple of years ago I asked Phil Bolger for a rough water rowboat
        for two crew, and he suggested his 19'-6" Long Light Dory. I built
        that boat, too, and greatly enjoy it, but I wouldn't try to cartop it,
        and least not alone. This boat is also used in the Blackburn
        Challenge by two-man teams.

        I think that if you decked over Batto, it might get too heavy to
        easily cartop alone. I'd suggest Robote, or perhaps Vireo14. The
        original 15'-6" Bolger Light Dory (aka Gloucester Gull) is also a
        possibility, but might be too heavy to cartop.

        Robote: http://www.kolbsadventures.com/robote_8.htm
        Long Light Dory: http://www.kolbsadventures.com/long_dory_7.htm

        Jon Kolb
        www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
      • John and Kathy Trussell
        I recently finished LHF 17 and added end decks to bulkheads for water tight flotation. LFH17 is based on the original Hereshoff rowboat and not Gardener s
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 14 3:16 PM
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          I recently finished LHF 17 and added end decks to bulkheads for water tight
          flotation. LFH17 is based on the original Hereshoff rowboat and not
          Gardener's modified version. Correspondence to Gardner indicated that the
          original Herreshoff boat would ' knife ' into waves, so I added the decks.
          So far, I haven't had a wave over the bow, but you never know..



          LFH 17 is one of Jim's more complicated designs, but it sure is pretty.



          John T



          _____

          From: Michalak@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Michalak@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
          Of adventures_in_astrophotography
          Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2007 9:51 AM
          To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Michalak] Re: Batto cover/deck for rough waters?



          Hi Atsuko,

          > Aloha! I've had the plans for Batto for a while and been waiting for
          a chance to build it but I think I may have a problem. I was out in
          > the
          > waters I usually paddle with my kayak and while sloshing through the
          > chop/waves I realized that Batto has low sides and would probably be
          > taking on quite a bit of water if she was out here now. What can I
          do
          > to keep the water out? Should I make a cockpit cover (tarp)or deck
          the
          > rest of the boat? I choose Batto because I wanted something fast but
          > light and easy enough to cartop and its low profile so I won't get
          > blown around by the winds. Also, if you happen to flip, how do you
          get
          > back in? Any suggestions are greatly appreciated. Mahalo, Atsuko

          I row in high elevation lakes and reservoirs that can get pretty rough
          quickly, so my problem is somewhat similar to yours. I looked at
          Batto, but eventually decided on Robote, partly because it has more
          beam and you can actually stand up in it, although clumsily because of hf 17
          the v-bottom. I'm sure Batto is faster than Robote, but Robote is
          plenty fast itself, and it can built just as light for cartopping.

          To make the boat drier and hopefully allow me to re-enter if I was
          knocked overboard, I decked the ends and installed 1/4-turn hatches.
          I keep a bailing scoop in one compartment, but so far I have not had
          to use it. Robote is actually quite good in rough water (rough by my
          standards) thanks to the v-bottom, and I've never taken more that a
          few drops of spray aboard, even rowing into a stiff wind. One guy
          actually rowed an undecked Robote in the Blackburn Challenge, an ocean
          rowing race around Cape Ann in Massachusetts. BTW, I think the sharp
          v-bottom also allows straighter tracking in crosswinds.

          A couple of years ago I asked Phil Bolger for a rough water rowboat
          for two crew, and he suggested his 19'-6" Long Light Dory. I built
          that boat, too, and greatly enjoy it, but I wouldn't try to cartop it,
          and least not alone. This boat is also used in the Blackburn
          Challenge by two-man teams.

          I think that if you decked over Batto, it might get too heavy to
          easily cartop alone. I'd suggest Robote, or perhaps Vireo14. The
          original 15'-6" Bolger Light Dory (aka Gloucester Gull) is also a
          possibility, but might be too heavy to cartop.

          Robote: http://www.kolbsadv <http://www.kolbsadventures.com/robote_8.htm>
          entures.com/robote_8.htm
          Long Light Dory: http://www.kolbsadv
          <http://www.kolbsadventures.com/long_dory_7.htm> entures.com/long_dory_7.htm

          Jon Kolb
          www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • vexatious2001
          ... water tight ... that the ... decks. ... pretty. ... Not sure why, but the message above got side tracked because yahoo thought it was spam. While
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 17 5:32 AM
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            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "John and Kathy Trussell"
            <jtrussell2@...> wrote:
            >
            > I recently finished LHF 17 and added end decks to bulkheads for
            water tight
            > flotation. LFH17 is based on the original Hereshoff rowboat and not
            > Gardener's modified version. Correspondence to Gardner indicated
            that the
            > original Herreshoff boat would ' knife ' into waves, so I added the
            decks.
            > So far, I haven't had a wave over the bow, but you never know..
            >
            >
            >
            > LFH 17 is one of Jim's more complicated designs, but it sure is
            pretty.
            >
            >
            >
            > John T
            >
            >




            Not sure why, but the message above got "side tracked" because
            yahoo thought it was spam.

            While messages that ARE spam post-though just fine.

            Go figure.


            Max
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