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Re: IMB on a kitesurfing rig

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  • zoomclimber
    And a few very interesting discussions: http://boatdesign.net/forums/showthread.php?t=6641 www.kiteship.com http://www.instructables.com/id/EQ3R34Q8B3EP287BU8/
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 4 8:19 PM
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      And a few very interesting discussions:

      http://boatdesign.net/forums/showthread.php?t=6641

      www.kiteship.com

      http://www.instructables.com/id/EQ3R34Q8B3EP287BU8/

      http://www.dcss.org/speedsl/KI1088.html

      There's some good info out there. I'm getting hooked on the idea.

      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "zoomclimber" <drue_apple@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I did see something in Popular Science or Popular Mechanics
      recently
      > about this idea for potential use on tankers. Even if it just
      saved
      > them 15-20% on their fuel costs it'd be a big deal. I was
      thinking
      > about it before then, but I'm sure the convergance of the idea is
      > about to come together for several folks. So I'm not inventing
      > anything.
      >
      > I think it has some pluses and some minuses. You get a better
      view
      > of what's around you, but also a greater chance of wrapping your
      > kite around whatever is around you. Even a little Potter or
      Compac
      > in between you and your kite could ruin your day.
      >
      > Also, they trim themselves pretty well, but because you have close
      > to 100% of the vector pulling at all times, it makes speed and
      > balance on a close-haul tack a bit of a challenge. Might require
      a
      > bigger and more authoritative rudder to trim.
      >
      > A nice, fat pram shape like the IMB might be a little more
      forgiving
      > of that than a skinny, top-heavy kayak.
      >
      > Finally, they really do pull, and instant reefing isn't an
      option.
      > If you misjudge the size for the wind, you might wind up going
      > airborne and then submarining on the downward trip. So on a run,
      > you better be trimmed; you might take off like a 747.
      >
      > Slowing down in a regular sailboat is a lot easier because you can
      > get real draggy real fast. With the kite you have to grab a riser
      > end (and or A and B lines) on one side and get the thing to spill
      so
      > it stalls and drops. Then you can slow the boat down.
      >
      > I'll probably start with a smaller kite and experiment a little.
      >
      > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "saillips" <saillips@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > > Anyone have some thoughts on this or know someone who has
      tried
      > this?
      > > >
      > > Google "kite sail" and you should come up with a web site for
      some
      > > people in Australia using BIG (40-60 meters ?!?) kites on
      offshore
      > boats.
      > > No mast or standing rigging as the lines are led to the deck
      from
      > the
      > > kite, so less "arm" to heel the boat resulting in a fast,
      stable
      > hull.
      > > I think it has great potential for small boats from, as you say,
      > > kayaks to shoal draft little cruisers.
      > >
      >
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