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fitting out

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  • Norman Wolfe
    I have not fitted bow chocks to my NormsBoat. Instead, I cleat the anchor rode to the fore-deck cleat, then take a turn around the stem head (which I wish were
    Message 1 of 16 , Aug 31, 2005
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      I have not fitted bow chocks to my NormsBoat. Instead, I cleat the
      anchor rode to the fore-deck cleat, then take a turn around the stem
      head (which I wish were about 6" high, rather than 3"). This has worked
      well in the protected waters I where I anchor. In fact, the stem head
      has worked so well that I installed 2 oak sampson posts in the stern, in
      the aft corners of the motor well, and have the aft cleats near the
      cockpit. Aft line leads from the cleat, once around a sampson post, then
      to the stern anchor.

      If I need a better lead from the bow, I use a line from the trailer eye
      which is centered on the stem, and tie it to the anchor rode with a
      rolling hitch.

      Norm Wolfe
    • John B. Trussell
      Kevin--I m going through the same process on my Toon 19. One of the nice things about building your own boat is that you get to put fittings where you want,
      Message 2 of 16 , Sep 1, 2005
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        Kevin--I'm going through the same process on my Toon 19. One of the nice
        things about building your own boat is that you get to put fittings where
        you want, and this is a good thing because the designer often leaves these
        "details" to the builder.

        I find I can get by with one bow chock which I mount as close to the stem as
        possible. The forward cleat will have to be strong enough to hold the boat
        against the pull of the anchor or the pull of a tow line. I am not familiar
        with the structure of Norm's boat, but I run a 2x4 under the foredeck from
        the stem to the forward bulkhead, build the deck on that, and through bolt
        the cleat through the deck and 2x4. If you are talking about through
        bolting through the deck, I would suggest adding a plywood backing plate
        under the deck to spread the stresses as much as possible.

        You will also need a similiar cleat somewhere on the aft quarter. This is
        necessary if you ever need to tow someone. A line to the forward cleat and
        the aft cleat will be off great help when you are tied up to a dock or when
        you are trying to coax the boat onto a trailer in a cross wind. Just be
        aware that the sheet on your sail has a propensity for entangling itself at
        the slightest provacation, or none at all! Consider this possibility when
        locating the aft cleat.

        John T

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "emmons_kevin" <emmons_kevin@...>
        To: <Michalak@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2005 4:50 PM
        Subject: [Michalak] fitting out


        > Fitting out this Normsboat is sort of driving me crazy as there are
        > no details to go by. Right now I'm figuring the bow chocks, anchor
        > cleat, and deck cleats. The only sailing I've done is on glass boats
        > and they're complete when you get them.
        >
        > I'm going to put a six inch galvanized cleat above the forward vent
        > so that it can be bolted through. That's to secure the anchor. The
        > anchor will have it's permanent attachent below the vent to an eye
        > bolt that I'll secure to a board glued and screwed below the vent to
        > the frames of the bulkhead. After the anchor is thown, the line will
        > be cleated and should then lead to the bow chocks (bolted through the
        > mahogany gunwhales, damn the looks of it) which I've estimated to be
        > six inches or so behind the stem, either side. Does this sound right?
        > I hate to drill all of those holes and have to fill them again. With
        > the backing that I've mentioned does this seem secure?
        >
        > I thought about a bit for the anchor line but there really is not
        > room for it, and besides, it would block the vent if in the anchor
        > well.
        >
        > Any comments or suggestions are appreciated.
        >
        > Kevin
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > No virus found in this incoming message.
        > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
        > Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.10.16/83 - Release Date: 8/26/2005
        >
        >
      • emmons_kevin
        ... the nice ... where ... leaves these ... the stem as ... the boat ... familiar ... foredeck from ... through bolt ... through ... plate ... This is ...
        Message 3 of 16 , Sep 2, 2005
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          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "John B. Trussell"
          <John.Trussell@w...> wrote:
          > Kevin--I'm going through the same process on my Toon 19. One of
          the nice
          > things about building your own boat is that you get to put fittings
          where
          > you want, and this is a good thing because the designer often
          leaves these
          > "details" to the builder.
          >
          > I find I can get by with one bow chock which I mount as close to
          the stem as
          > possible. The forward cleat will have to be strong enough to hold
          the boat
          > against the pull of the anchor or the pull of a tow line. I am not
          familiar
          > with the structure of Norm's boat, but I run a 2x4 under the
          foredeck from
          > the stem to the forward bulkhead, build the deck on that, and
          through bolt
          > the cleat through the deck and 2x4. If you are talking about
          through
          > bolting through the deck, I would suggest adding a plywood backing
          plate
          > under the deck to spread the stresses as much as possible.
          >
          > You will also need a similiar cleat somewhere on the aft quarter.
          This is
          > necessary if you ever need to tow someone. A line to the forward
          cleat and
          > the aft cleat will be off great help when you are tied up to a dock
          or when
          > you are trying to coax the boat onto a trailer in a cross wind.
          Just be
          > aware that the sheet on your sail has a propensity for entangling
          itself at
          > the slightest provacation, or none at all! Consider this
          possibility when
          > locating the aft cleat.
          >
          > John T
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "emmons_kevin" <emmons_kevin@y...>
          > To: <Michalak@yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2005 4:50 PM
          > Subject: [Michalak] fitting out
          >
          >
          > > Fitting out this Normsboat is sort of driving me crazy as there
          are
          > > no details to go by. Right now I'm figuring the bow chocks, anchor
          > > cleat, and deck cleats. The only sailing I've done is on glass
          boats
          > > and they're complete when you get them.
          > >
          > > I'm going to put a six inch galvanized cleat above the forward
          vent
          > > so that it can be bolted through. That's to secure the anchor. The
          > > anchor will have it's permanent attachent below the vent to an eye
          > > bolt that I'll secure to a board glued and screwed below the vent
          to
          > > the frames of the bulkhead. After the anchor is thown, the line
          will
          > > be cleated and should then lead to the bow chocks (bolted through
          the
          > > mahogany gunwhales, damn the looks of it) which I've estimated to
          be
          > > six inches or so behind the stem, either side. Does this sound
          right?
          > > I hate to drill all of those holes and have to fill them again.
          With
          > > the backing that I've mentioned does this seem secure?
          > >
          > > I thought about a bit for the anchor line but there really is not
          > > room for it, and besides, it would block the vent if in the anchor
          > > well.
          > >
          > > Any comments or suggestions are appreciated.
          > >
          > > Kevin
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --
          > > No virus found in this incoming message.
          > > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
          > > Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.10.16/83 - Release Date:
          8/26/2005
          > >

          Thanks John, it seems that it worked as planned with the layout
          mentioned. I bought the bow chocks from Duckworks and they come in a
          pair. I put them 5 inches behind the stem and eliminated the eyebolt
          as the six inch cleat (now just above the vent so as to avoid
          stepping on it when stepping on the "stepdeck") will easily accept
          the terminal end of the anchor line and and a few wraps after
          dropping the iron. I through bolted all of the cleats and cushioned
          them with polyurethane glue to absorb the shock.

          Thanks again

          Kevin
          > >
        • emmons_kevin
          ... worked ... head ... in ... then ... eye ... I hadn t considered a stern anchor yet, but I have a spare and might as well put it in. The waters I m going to
          Message 4 of 16 , Sep 2, 2005
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            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, Norman Wolfe <norman.wolfe@v...> wrote:
            > I have not fitted bow chocks to my NormsBoat. Instead, I cleat the
            > anchor rode to the fore-deck cleat, then take a turn around the stem
            > head (which I wish were about 6" high, rather than 3"). This has
            worked
            > well in the protected waters I where I anchor. In fact, the stem
            head
            > has worked so well that I installed 2 oak sampson posts in the stern,
            in
            > the aft corners of the motor well, and have the aft cleats near the
            > cockpit. Aft line leads from the cleat, once around a sampson post,
            then
            > to the stern anchor.
            >
            > If I need a better lead from the bow, I use a line from the trailer
            eye
            > which is centered on the stem, and tie it to the anchor rode with a
            > rolling hitch.
            >
            > Norm Wolfe



            I hadn't considered a stern anchor yet, but I have a spare and might as
            well put it in. The waters I'm going to be in are similar to yours,
            Barnegat Bay, etc., so it shouldn't be difficult to set two anchors. I
            split my stem by accident and it became a two inch stem, I did't feel
            like gluing it. The bow chocks work excellent, however, and keep the
            rop over and above any wook for abrasion purposes.

            Thanks

            Kevin
          • robrohdeszudy
            I haven t tried them yet, but I like the look of the chocks Pete Culler used to put on his boats. He fit a low bulwark to the sheer forward, then cut chocks
            Message 5 of 16 , Sep 2, 2005
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              I haven't tried them yet, but I like the look of the chocks Pete Culler
              used to put on his boats. He fit a low bulwark to the sheer forward,
              then cut chocks into the wood. This apparently works in conjunction
              with what he calls a "Nova Scotia Bitt". I can't tell how from the
              pictures. See what I mean in "Pete Culler's Boats", which you can get
              through inter-library loan.
              --Rob


              > I hadn't considered a stern anchor yet, but I have a spare and might
              as
              > well put it in. The waters I'm going to be in are similar to yours,
              > Barnegat Bay, etc., so it shouldn't be difficult to set two anchors.
              I
              > split my stem by accident and it became a two inch stem, I did't feel
              > like gluing it. The bow chocks work excellent, however, and keep the
              > rop over and above any wook for abrasion purposes.
              >
              > Thanks
              >
              > Kevin
            • awellbalancedgun
              Can you post a pic of these chocks, please? ... Culler ... forward, ... conjunction ... get ... might ... yours, ... anchors. ... feel ... the
              Message 6 of 16 , Sep 3, 2005
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                Can you post a pic of these chocks, please?


                --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "robrohdeszudy"
                <robrohdeszudy@y...> wrote:
                > I haven't tried them yet, but I like the look of the chocks Pete
                Culler
                > used to put on his boats. He fit a low bulwark to the sheer
                forward,
                > then cut chocks into the wood. This apparently works in
                conjunction
                > with what he calls a "Nova Scotia Bitt". I can't tell how from the
                > pictures. See what I mean in "Pete Culler's Boats", which you can
                get
                > through inter-library loan.
                > --Rob
                >
                >
                > > I hadn't considered a stern anchor yet, but I have a spare and
                might
                > as
                > > well put it in. The waters I'm going to be in are similar to
                yours,
                > > Barnegat Bay, etc., so it shouldn't be difficult to set two
                anchors.
                > I
                > > split my stem by accident and it became a two inch stem, I did't
                feel
                > > like gluing it. The bow chocks work excellent, however, and keep
                the
                > > rop over and above any wook for abrasion purposes.
                > >
                > > Thanks
                > >
                > > Kevin
              • robrohdeszudy
                Sure will. Gotta get something scanned, though! --Rob ... the ... did t ... keep
                Message 7 of 16 , Sep 6, 2005
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                  Sure will. Gotta get something scanned, though!
                  --Rob

                  --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "awellbalancedgun"
                  <awellbalancedgun@y...> wrote:
                  > Can you post a pic of these chocks, please?
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "robrohdeszudy"
                  > <robrohdeszudy@y...> wrote:
                  > > I haven't tried them yet, but I like the look of the chocks Pete
                  > Culler
                  > > used to put on his boats. He fit a low bulwark to the sheer
                  > forward,
                  > > then cut chocks into the wood. This apparently works in
                  > conjunction
                  > > with what he calls a "Nova Scotia Bitt". I can't tell how from
                  the
                  > > pictures. See what I mean in "Pete Culler's Boats", which you can
                  > get
                  > > through inter-library loan.
                  > > --Rob
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > > I hadn't considered a stern anchor yet, but I have a spare and
                  > might
                  > > as
                  > > > well put it in. The waters I'm going to be in are similar to
                  > yours,
                  > > > Barnegat Bay, etc., so it shouldn't be difficult to set two
                  > anchors.
                  > > I
                  > > > split my stem by accident and it became a two inch stem, I
                  did't
                  > feel
                  > > > like gluing it. The bow chocks work excellent, however, and
                  keep
                  > the
                  > > > rop over and above any wook for abrasion purposes.
                  > > >
                  > > > Thanks
                  > > >
                  > > > Kevin
                • robrohdeszudy
                  Hey guys, I posted some scans of the Pete Culler chocks I was talking about at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Michalak_Boats_Photos_Only/files/Culler% 20Files/
                  Message 8 of 16 , Sep 12, 2005
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                    Hey guys,
                    I posted some scans of the Pete Culler chocks I was talking about at

                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Michalak_Boats_Photos_Only/files/Culler%
                    20Files/

                    Culler calls the rail caps "Buffalo Rails". The chocks are cut into
                    these and work with the deck cleat he calls a "Nova Scotia Bitt". I
                    guess this must all be Maine-speak, since I've never heard of anything
                    of the kind in the middle of the country.

                    I can see how the arrangement would be handy. I can imagine that
                    hauling the boat in against a wind, you could catch the line under the
                    bitt's cross pin, and put your foot against the fordeck carlin to
                    really lean into it. And of course the bitt is inherently strong in the
                    right direction, putting most of its force against the stempost, which
                    ought to be strong.

                    If anyone's interested, I also have the article on "Otter", the boat
                    that Jim's "Batto" derives from.

                    --Rob
                  • graeme19121984
                    Hi Rob, thanks for that. The link doesn t work so I made this tiny one http://tinyurl.com/b73wh The Nova Scotia Bitt looks very much like a cleat Bolger
                    Message 9 of 16 , Sep 13, 2005
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                      Hi Rob,

                      thanks for that. The link doesn't work so I made this tiny one
                      http://tinyurl.com/b73wh

                      The "Nova Scotia Bitt" looks very much like a cleat Bolger sometimes
                      details and calls it a "Jonesport Cleat". I can't say I recollect it
                      being detailed along with those "Buffalo Rails". They're neat and
                      would indeed work very well with the cleat.

                      This "anyone" is interested in your "Otter" article, please post.

                      Graeme

                      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "robrohdeszudy"
                      <robrohdeszudy@y...> wrote:
                      > Hey guys,
                      > I posted some scans of the Pete Culler chocks I was talking about
                      >at
                      >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Michalak_Boats_Photos_Only/files/Culle
                      >r%20Files/

                      > If anyone's interested, I also have the article on "Otter", the
                      >boat
                      > that Jim's "Batto" derives from.
                      > --Rob
                    • robrohdeszudy
                      Hey there ... Thanks. ... sometimes ... it ... Yeah, it looks pretty useful, whatever those crazy easterners call it. ... Duly uploaded. I ve had Batto plans
                      Message 10 of 16 , Sep 13, 2005
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                        Hey there

                        > thanks for that. The link doesn't work so I made this tiny one
                        > http://tinyurl.com/b73wh

                        Thanks.

                        > The "Nova Scotia Bitt" looks very much like a cleat Bolger
                        sometimes
                        > details and calls it a "Jonesport Cleat". I can't say I recollect
                        it
                        > being detailed along with those "Buffalo Rails". They're neat and
                        > would indeed work very well with the cleat.

                        Yeah, it looks pretty useful, whatever those crazy easterners call it.

                        > This "anyone" is interested in your "Otter" article, please post.

                        Duly uploaded. I've had Batto plans for a few years, and I'm thinking
                        this winter might be the time. I'm thinking on 1/8" ply sides to keep
                        it light enough to sling over a shoulder.

                        --Rob
                      • jhkohnen@boat-links.com
                        Bolger calls that a Jonesport cleat . Jonesport is in Nova Scotia, I think... ... -- John http://www.boat-links.com/ I cannot help
                        Message 11 of 16 , Sep 16, 2005
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                          Bolger calls that a "Jonesport cleat". Jonesport is in Nova Scotia, I
                          think...

                          On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 13:43:59 -0000, Rob wrote:
                          > Hey guys,
                          > I posted some scans of the Pete Culler chocks I was talking about at
                          >
                          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Michalak_Boats_Photos_Only/files/Culler%
                          > 20Files/
                          >
                          > Culler calls the rail caps "Buffalo Rails". The chocks are cut into
                          > these and work with the deck cleat he calls a "Nova Scotia Bitt". I
                          > guess this must all be Maine-speak, since I've never heard of anything
                          > of the kind in the middle of the country.
                          > ...

                          --
                          John <jkohnen@...>
                          http://www.boat-links.com/
                          I cannot help thinking that the people with motor boats miss a great deal.
                          If they would only keep to rowboats or canoes, and use oar or paddle...
                          they would get infinitely more benefit than by having their work done for
                          them by gasoline. <Theodore Roosevelt>
                        • Howard Stephenson
                          Here s a clear photo of a Jonesport cleat: http://www.chebacco.com/chebuild/Image30.gif And here s a map showing a Jonesport in Maine:
                          Message 12 of 16 , Sep 16, 2005
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                            Here's a clear photo of a Jonesport cleat:

                            http://www.chebacco.com/chebuild/Image30.gif

                            And here's a map showing a Jonesport in Maine:

                            http://www.jonesportrealty.com/images/mp1.gif


                            Howard

                            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, jhkohnen@b... wrote:
                            > Bolger calls that a "Jonesport cleat". Jonesport is in Nova Scotia, I
                            > think...
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