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Re: Trailer set up for 14' June Bug

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  • Steven Lewis
    Just keep in mind...you gotta have enough weight on the tongue to keep it on the hitch. Experience talking here. Steve ... that boat ... axel. I ... even had
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 2, 2005
      Just keep in mind...you gotta have enough weight on the tongue to
      keep it on the hitch. Experience talking here.

      Steve

      --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Chuck Leinweber" <chuck@d...> wrote:
      > I once built a 29 foot Bolger Tennessee and at least 12 feet of
      that boat
      > hung out past the end of the trailer. The frame ended just past the
      axel. I
      > hauled that boat all over the place and never had any problems. It
      even had
      > a 9.9 Honda outboard on the transom.
      >
      > Remember to place the bunks directly under bulkheads. I think two
      is plenty
      > for a June Bug. I like to cover the bunks with astro-turf cut from
      welcome
      > mats found at Wal-Mart. Its quite slippery and gives good
      cushioning.
      >
      > Chuck
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Michalak@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Michalak@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf
      > Of junebugnj2003
      > Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 10:06 PM
      > To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Michalak] Trailer set up for 14' June Bug
      >
      > Hi folks. Haven't checked in here for a while. I wrote about a
      > year ago and was considering building the Viola 22. Since have
      > figured out that it's too much of a project for me and will
      probably
      > switch to a 14' Stevenson Pocket Cruiser. (I do plan on using JM's
      > slot-top design on the cabin however.) In any event I purchased a
      > used 12' trailer on e-bay and am trying to set it up for my 14'
      June
      > Bug, and eventually for the the Pocket Cruiser when built. I
      > remember seeing a discussion about using athwartship bunks for flat
      > bottomed sharpies so I plan on placing bunks directly under the
      stem
      > and the two frames of the boat. Here's the problem. I figured I'd
      > have 2' of overhang from the stern with a 14' boat. After getting
      > trailer home, I realized it has a winch post and the distance from
      > post to end of trailer is 9'. So now I have 5' of overhang. (Oh
      > well, experience is the best teacher.) This will be too much for a
      > 600lb Pocket Cruiser. Can I get away with this for the 150lb June
      > Bug though? Stern would be left hanging, but the boat has three
      > skids/gripes running from stem to stern which will provide some
      > support. As far as balance, it looks like the balance point on the
      > boat is almost directly over the wheels. Trailer also seems to be
      > front heavy. It has 60lbs on the hitch when empty.
      >
      > Also any long term ideas for modifying trailer for a 14', 600lb
      > Pocket Cruiser greatly appreciated.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > No virus found in this incoming message.
      > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
      > Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.9.7/60 - Release Date:
      7/28/2005
      >
      >
      > --
      > No virus found in this outgoing message.
      > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
      > Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.9.7/60 - Release Date:
      7/28/2005
    • robrohdeszudy
      It s tricky. You can weld on more metal to the rear, but you might also have to move the suspension aft to get the right tongue weight. This most likely
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 2, 2005
        It's tricky. You can weld on more metal to the rear, but you might
        also have to move the suspension aft to get the right tongue weight.
        This most likely requires welding on new spring brackets, assuming
        there's a good, strong place to put them further aft.

        On my light schooner trailer , I have the aftmost 2' of boat
        supported only by the 4 longitudinal 2x4 bunks. They're tied togetehr
        at the aft end by a transverse 2x4. I think you always want this to
        serve as a skid plate, if for no other reason.

        For a light boat I might make tilting bunks. Like a square frame of
        angle iron with rollers or wood bunks mounted, pivoting around 1/2"
        rod fittings at the aft end of the existing trailer. Then you could
        unpin the front and tilt the entire bunk down to winch the boat on
        without getting the trailer bearings wet. (Unfortunately for me, this
        gets pretty unwieldy for a 24' boat.)

        The main problem is STILL whether you can get your wheels in the
        right place. There's only so much weight you can shift forward.

        --Rob


        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "junebugnj2003" <graystork@c...>
        wrote:
        > Hi folks. Haven't checked in here for a while. I wrote about a
        > year ago and was considering building the Viola 22. Since have
        > figured out that it's too much of a project for me and will
        probably
        > switch to a 14' Stevenson Pocket Cruiser. (I do plan on using JM's
        > slot-top design on the cabin however.) In any event I purchased a
        > used 12' trailer on e-bay and am trying to set it up for my 14'
        June
        > Bug, and eventually for the the Pocket Cruiser when built. I
        > remember seeing a discussion about using athwartship bunks for flat
        > bottomed sharpies so I plan on placing bunks directly under the
        stem
        > and the two frames of the boat. Here's the problem. I figured I'd
        > have 2' of overhang from the stern with a 14' boat. After getting
        > trailer home, I realized it has a winch post and the distance from
        > post to end of trailer is 9'. So now I have 5' of overhang. (Oh
        > well, experience is the best teacher.) This will be too much for a
        > 600lb Pocket Cruiser. Can I get away with this for the 150lb June
        > Bug though? Stern would be left hanging, but the boat has three
        > skids/gripes running from stem to stern which will provide some
        > support. As far as balance, it looks like the balance point on the
        > boat is almost directly over the wheels. Trailer also seems to be
        > front heavy. It has 60lbs on the hitch when empty.
        >
        > Also any long term ideas for modifying trailer for a 14', 600lb
        > Pocket Cruiser greatly appreciated.
      • robrohdeszudy
        I assume Chuck made sure the tongue weight was correct, since too little tongue weight will hammer your trailer to pieces. I did that once by accident while
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 2, 2005
          I assume Chuck made sure the tongue weight was correct, since too
          little tongue weight will hammer your trailer to pieces. I did that
          once by accident while moving back from Boston. I just about launched
          the trailer off the highway when a tongue weld broke in upstate NY. I
          had to creep at 10 mph to find a welder. Got lucky and found one
          JUST before they closed for the weekend! They got a nice "beer money"
          tip. Finished moving back to WI and learned to weld right away!
          --Rob

          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Chuck Leinweber" <chuck@d...> wrote:
          > I once built a 29 foot Bolger Tennessee and at least 12 feet of
          that boat
          > hung out past the end of the trailer. The frame ended just past the
          axel. I
          > hauled that boat all over the place and never had any problems. It
          even had
          > a 9.9 Honda outboard on the transom.
          >
          > Remember to place the bunks directly under bulkheads. I think two
          is plenty
          > for a June Bug. I like to cover the bunks with astro-turf cut from
          welcome
          > mats found at Wal-Mart. Its quite slippery and gives good
          cushioning.
          >
          > Chuck
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Michalak@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Michalak@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf
          > Of junebugnj2003
          > Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 10:06 PM
          > To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [Michalak] Trailer set up for 14' June Bug
          >
          > Hi folks. Haven't checked in here for a while. I wrote about a
          > year ago and was considering building the Viola 22. Since have
          > figured out that it's too much of a project for me and will
          probably
          > switch to a 14' Stevenson Pocket Cruiser. (I do plan on using JM's
          > slot-top design on the cabin however.) In any event I purchased a
          > used 12' trailer on e-bay and am trying to set it up for my 14'
          June
          > Bug, and eventually for the the Pocket Cruiser when built. I
          > remember seeing a discussion about using athwartship bunks for flat
          > bottomed sharpies so I plan on placing bunks directly under the
          stem
          > and the two frames of the boat. Here's the problem. I figured I'd
          > have 2' of overhang from the stern with a 14' boat. After getting
          > trailer home, I realized it has a winch post and the distance from
          > post to end of trailer is 9'. So now I have 5' of overhang. (Oh
          > well, experience is the best teacher.) This will be too much for a
          > 600lb Pocket Cruiser. Can I get away with this for the 150lb June
          > Bug though? Stern would be left hanging, but the boat has three
          > skids/gripes running from stem to stern which will provide some
          > support. As far as balance, it looks like the balance point on the
          > boat is almost directly over the wheels. Trailer also seems to be
          > front heavy. It has 60lbs on the hitch when empty.
          >
          > Also any long term ideas for modifying trailer for a 14', 600lb
          > Pocket Cruiser greatly appreciated.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > No virus found in this incoming message.
          > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
          > Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.9.7/60 - Release Date:
          7/28/2005
          >
          >
          > --
          > No virus found in this outgoing message.
          > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
          > Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.9.7/60 - Release Date:
          7/28/2005
        • junebugnj2003
          Thanks for the great ideas guys. I m headed to Wal-Mart now for my Astro-Turf mats. I ll load up the June Bug and then get a reading on the tongue weight to
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 2, 2005
            Thanks for the great ideas guys. I'm headed to Wal-Mart now for my
            Astro-Turf mats. I'll load up the June Bug and then get a reading on
            the tongue weight to make sure I'm ok. I think I'll go with the
            tilting bunk set up on the back once I shift to the heavier Pocket
            Cruiser.

            Another interesting point I didn't mention. My trailer has no leaf
            springs. Instead each wheel is attached cantilever style to a steel
            rod that that then makes a 90 degree turn athwartship where it is
            attached to a crossmember of the trailer. Have you ever seen an
            arrangement like this before?

            Dave
          • andrecas@aol.com
            I don t know too much about trailers, but from my old engineering days that sounds to me like you ve got torsion bar springs like Chryslers did in the 60s and
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 2, 2005
              I don't know too much about trailers, but from my old engineering days that sounds to me like you've got torsion bar springs like Chryslers did in the 60s and VW Beetles had at one time. Nothing wrong with well-designed torsion bars. One MAJOR advantage of leaf springs, however, is that the multiple leaves rub against each other, thereby introducing a good deal of friction which acts as damping. This lets you get away without shock absorbers without bouncing all over the place. Torsion bars should have much less friction and so may be bouncier. Does the trailer have shocks?

              Andre


              -----Original Message-----
              From: junebugnj2003 <graystork@...>
              To: Michalak@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tue, 02 Aug 2005 18:08:48 -0000
              Subject: [Michalak] Re: Trailer set up for 14' June Bug


              Thanks for the great ideas guys. I'm headed to Wal-Mart now for my
              Astro-Turf mats. I'll load up the June Bug and then get a reading on
              the tongue weight to make sure I'm ok. I think I'll go with the
              tilting bunk set up on the back once I shift to the heavier Pocket
              Cruiser.

              Another interesting point I didn't mention. My trailer has no leaf
              springs. Instead each wheel is attached cantilever style to a steel
              rod that that then makes a 90 degree turn athwartship where it is
              attached to a crossmember of the trailer. Have you ever seen an
              arrangement like this before?

              Dave





              Yahoo! Groups Links






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • junebugnj2003
              Andre, I think you re right. I found some info on the net about torsion bars and it sounds like what I have. I can t see any shocks on it. The torsion bar
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 2, 2005
                Andre,

                I think you're right. I found some info on the net about torsion bars
                and it sounds like what I have. I can't see any shocks on it. The
                torsion bar goes from the wheel, turns 90 degrees and then goes into a
                sealed rectangular box assembly which spans the width of the trailer.
                The torsion bar for the other wheel goes in the opposite side of this
                box.

                When you stand on it, it feels softer than a leaf spring suspension.
                It feels similar to a car suspension.

                Dave
              • Ron Butterfield
                ... You mean like these? http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=6970&productId=25127&R=25127 or http://tinyurl.com/8jw7w
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 2, 2005
                  At 02:08 PM 8/2/05, you wrote:

                  >Another interesting point I didn't mention. My trailer has no leaf
                  >springs. Instead each wheel is attached cantilever style to a steel
                  >rod that that then makes a 90 degree turn athwartship where it is
                  >attached to a crossmember of the trailer. Have you ever seen an
                  >arrangement like this before?

                  You mean like these?
                  http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=6970&productId=25127&R=25127
                  or
                  http://tinyurl.com/8jw7w

                  They actually have a rubber bonded to the lever and the housing for the
                  torsion spring. Using rubber for a spring is supposed to give a damping
                  effect so it isn't as bouncy as steel springs. Slightly more expensive than
                  the "normal" spring arrangement.

                  Regards,
                  RonB
                • robrohdeszudy
                  Yup. Rubber torsion springs. Far better than leaf spring on a boat trailer, since they don t trap water like the leaves. A bit more expensive, but ususally
                  Message 8 of 11 , Aug 3, 2005
                    Yup. Rubber torsion springs. Far better than leaf spring on a boat
                    trailer, since they don't trap water like the leaves. A bit more
                    expensive, but ususally worth it in the long run - no springs to
                    replace!
                    --Rob

                    > Another interesting point I didn't mention. My trailer has no leaf
                    > springs. Instead each wheel is attached cantilever style to a steel
                    > rod that that then makes a 90 degree turn athwartship where it is
                    > attached to a crossmember of the trailer. Have you ever seen an
                    > arrangement like this before?
                    >
                    > Dave
                  • junebugnj2003
                    Ron, Yes, mine look very similar. When you look at the side of the box where the torsion bar is attached to frame, you can see that the bar is surrounded with
                    Message 9 of 11 , Aug 4, 2005
                      Ron,
                      Yes, mine look very similar. When you look at the side of the box
                      where the torsion bar is attached to frame, you can see that the bar
                      is surrounded with rubber. A friend of mine told me that a common
                      application for this type of suspension is horse trailers. I guess my
                      130# June Bug will be in good hands!

                      Dave
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