Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Midwest Messabout / Aftermath

Expand Messages
  • vexatious2001
    ... Hey, Wojtek! I am afraid that I can t tell you much about Chicago-style Polish hot dogs, other than they were good. Mike Zenker, who has the Campanoe,
    Message 1 of 17 , Jul 4 6:08 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      > Max, tell me more about Chicago-style Polish hotdogs please? No
      > kidding, I'm really curious about them.
      >
      > -Wojtek




      Hey, Wojtek!

      I am afraid that I can't tell you
      much about Chicago-style Polish hot
      dogs, other than they were good.

      Mike Zenker, who has the Campanoe, brought
      them down from Chicago.

      I would assume that they are made more like
      a polish sausage than an ordinary hot dog,
      but I am just guessing at that.

      Of course, a polish suasage in the USA may not
      be at all like a Polish Sausage in Poland.

      Someone else brought the brautwurst, which to me
      actually looks a lot like a Polish sausage; these
      things are sometimes hard to find. They are
      apparently only sold in certain areas.

      We always have people who bring rather unique and
      wonderful food for the messabout; basically all I
      have to do is flip burgers, which I almost always
      burn (no worries about someone getting sick from
      under cooked beef when I am cooking.)


      Max
    • robrohdeszudy
      Wojtek, Being that my family are Poles from Chicago, I should be able to comment authoritively. But I can t cause I ve never had the stuff! What they call
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 5 10:33 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Wojtek,

        Being that my family are Poles from Chicago, I should be able to
        comment authoritively. But I can't 'cause I've never had the stuff!
        What they call "Polish Sausage" here is the same Kielbasa you're used
        to over there.

        I have a feeling that "Chicago-style Polish hotdogs" are simply beef
        hot dogs. In Chicago they call them "Vienna beef franks"
        (frankfurters). "Chicago style hot dog" usually refers the practice of
        dressing up a regular beef frank with more than the traditional
        ketchup, mustard and sweet pickle relish. "Chicago style" adds also
        pickle slices, tomato, hot peppers, and I forget what else.

        So it seems to me that two separate terms are being squished together.
        They looked like the Vienna beef franks to me, which as far as Ican
        tell are just large beef franks. Feel free to comment, Mike!

        Of course, Bratwurst is not Polish at all. What we have here is the
        same stuff they make in Germany. Here I can definitely comment
        authoritatively. The good stuff comes from right here in Wisconsin.
        Lots of Germans here. We take our beer and sausage seriously!

        --Rob



        > Max, tell me more about Chicago-style Polish hotdogs please? No
        > kidding, I'm really curious about them.
        >
        > -Wojtek
      • awellbalancedgun
        Ketchup on a hot dog, Rob? You had better stick to your Brats, ya hey! Since I am from (the) Chicago (suburbs), I might have just enough experience with
        Message 3 of 17 , Jul 5 3:31 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          Ketchup on a hot dog, Rob? You had better stick to your Brats, ya
          hey!

          Since I am from (the) Chicago (suburbs), I might have just enough
          experience with Chicago cuisine to be dangerous:

          I'll bet Mike brought what South Siders (people from the south side
          of Chicago - lots of decendents of Polish imigrants, there and on
          the Southwest Side) refer to as Polish Sausage (like the others, I
          don't know if you have Polish Sausage in Poland) to be cooked a la
          Maxwell Street (smothered in grilled [carmelized] onions) before the
          Maxwell Street Market closed down.

          For the record, a Chicago style dog starts with a steamed pure beef
          hot dog on a steamed poppyseed bun with the following toppings in
          this order:

          1. Yellow Mustard
          2. Green Pickle Relish
          3. Fresh Chopped Onions
          4. Two Tomato Wedges
          5. A Kosher Pickle Spear
          6. Two Sport Peppers
          7. A Dash of Celery Salt

          Note: NO KETCHUP

          Delicious.

          Oh, and if you only knew about Italian Beef (wet, of course)!

          Best,

          Tom Hamernik
          (direct decendent of a South Side Bohemian)

          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "robrohdeszudy"
          <robrohdeszudy@y...> wrote:
          > Wojtek,
          >
          > Being that my family are Poles from Chicago, I should be able to
          > comment authoritively. But I can't 'cause I've never had the
          stuff!
          > What they call "Polish Sausage" here is the same Kielbasa you're
          used
          > to over there.
          >
          > I have a feeling that "Chicago-style Polish hotdogs" are simply
          beef
          > hot dogs. In Chicago they call them "Vienna beef franks"
          > (frankfurters). "Chicago style hot dog" usually refers the
          practice of
          > dressing up a regular beef frank with more than the traditional
          > ketchup, mustard and sweet pickle relish. "Chicago style" adds
          also
          > pickle slices, tomato, hot peppers, and I forget what else.
          >
          > So it seems to me that two separate terms are being squished
          together.
          > They looked like the Vienna beef franks to me, which as far as
          Ican
          > tell are just large beef franks. Feel free to comment, Mike!
          >
          > Of course, Bratwurst is not Polish at all. What we have here is
          the
          > same stuff they make in Germany. Here I can definitely comment
          > authoritatively. The good stuff comes from right here in
          Wisconsin.
          > Lots of Germans here. We take our beer and sausage seriously!
          >
          > --Rob
          >
          >
          >
          > > Max, tell me more about Chicago-style Polish hotdogs please? No
          > > kidding, I'm really curious about them.
          > >
          > > -Wojtek
        • robrohdeszudy
          ... Dah! You are exactly right! Been a while (counting on my fingers...) since I ve been to the city, I guess. Shameful that I couldn t remember that, given
          Message 4 of 17 , Jul 6 12:03 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            > For the record, a Chicago style dog starts with a steamed pure beef
            > hot dog on a steamed poppyseed bun with the following toppings in
            > this order:
            >
            > 1. Yellow Mustard
            > 2. Green Pickle Relish
            > 3. Fresh Chopped Onions
            > 4. Two Tomato Wedges
            > 5. A Kosher Pickle Spear
            > 6. Two Sport Peppers
            > 7. A Dash of Celery Salt
            >
            > Note: NO KETCHUP

            Dah! You are exactly right! Been a while (counting on my fingers...)
            since I've been to the city, I guess. Shameful that I couldn't
            remember that, given that mom grew up at 63rd & Kedzie. (That'd be an
            Irish neighborhood at the time.) My dad's side are the Poles, but I
            can't remember what neighborhood they lived in.

            > I'll bet Mike brought what South Siders (people from the south side
            > of Chicago - lots of decendents of Polish imigrants, there and on
            > the Southwest Side) refer to as Polish Sausage (like the others, I
            > don't know if you have Polish Sausage in Poland) to be cooked a la
            > Maxwell Street (smothered in grilled [carmelized] onions) before
            > the Maxwell Street Market closed down.

            Couldn't tell you, actually. My family always called it kielbasa and
            it was the real stuff. Of course great grandpa would talkin in his
            sleep in Polish. I'm not sure what the other South Siders were
            referring to. Sorry Wojtek.

            Feel free to chime in, Mike!

            --Rob
          • Steven Lewis
            They weren t kielbasa... More like a footlong hotdog, beef, pork, chicken or a combination thereof. Steve ... beef ... fingers...) ... an ... side ... I ... la
            Message 5 of 17 , Jul 6 2:15 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              They weren't kielbasa... More like a footlong hotdog, beef, pork,
              chicken or a combination thereof.

              Steve

              --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "robrohdeszudy" <robrohdeszudy@y...>
              wrote:
              > > For the record, a Chicago style dog starts with a steamed pure
              beef
              > > hot dog on a steamed poppyseed bun with the following toppings in
              > > this order:
              > >
              > > 1. Yellow Mustard
              > > 2. Green Pickle Relish
              > > 3. Fresh Chopped Onions
              > > 4. Two Tomato Wedges
              > > 5. A Kosher Pickle Spear
              > > 6. Two Sport Peppers
              > > 7. A Dash of Celery Salt
              > >
              > > Note: NO KETCHUP
              >
              > Dah! You are exactly right! Been a while (counting on my
              fingers...)
              > since I've been to the city, I guess. Shameful that I couldn't
              > remember that, given that mom grew up at 63rd & Kedzie. (That'd be
              an
              > Irish neighborhood at the time.) My dad's side are the Poles, but I
              > can't remember what neighborhood they lived in.
              >
              > > I'll bet Mike brought what South Siders (people from the south
              side
              > > of Chicago - lots of decendents of Polish imigrants, there and on
              > > the Southwest Side) refer to as Polish Sausage (like the others,
              I
              > > don't know if you have Polish Sausage in Poland) to be cooked a
              la
              > > Maxwell Street (smothered in grilled [carmelized] onions) before
              > > the Maxwell Street Market closed down.
              >
              > Couldn't tell you, actually. My family always called it kielbasa
              and
              > it was the real stuff. Of course great grandpa would talkin in his
              > sleep in Polish. I'm not sure what the other South Siders were
              > referring to. Sorry Wojtek.
              >
              > Feel free to chime in, Mike!
              >
              > --Rob
            • robrohdeszudy
              Aha! That s what I figured. You da man Steve. There you have it, Wojtek. Just overgrown hot dogs. --Rob
              Message 6 of 17 , Jul 7 1:46 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                Aha! That's what I figured. You da man Steve.

                There you have it, Wojtek. Just overgrown hot dogs.

                --Rob

                --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Steven Lewis" <numbaoneman@a...>
                wrote:
                > They weren't kielbasa... More like a footlong hotdog, beef, pork,
                > chicken or a combination thereof.
                >
                > Steve
                >
              • wwbaginski
                Well, can I take a look at least? Some links please? -Wojtek
                Message 7 of 17 , Jul 7 2:39 PM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Well, can I take a look at least? Some links please?

                  -Wojtek

                  --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "robrohdeszudy" <robrohdeszudy@y...>
                  wrote:
                  > Aha! That's what I figured. You da man Steve.
                  >
                  > There you have it, Wojtek. Just overgrown hot dogs.
                  >
                  > --Rob
                  >
                  > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Steven Lewis" <numbaoneman@a...>
                  > wrote:
                  > > They weren't kielbasa... More like a footlong hotdog, beef, pork,
                  > > chicken or a combination thereof.
                  > >
                  > > Steve
                  > >
                • awellbalancedgun
                  Wojtek- Take a look at these: http://www.lowpro708.com/40/maxwell/ http://www.crawfordsausage.com/maxwellstreetpolish.shtml
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jul 7 6:48 PM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Wojtek-

                    Take a look at these:

                    http://www.lowpro708.com/40/maxwell/

                    http://www.crawfordsausage.com/maxwellstreetpolish.shtml

                    https://secure.icsp.net/irvings/polish.asp

                    http://www.viennabeef.com/recipe2.htm

                    http://cowdery.home.netcom.com/maxwell/demo.html

                    TJH


                    --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "wwbaginski" <wwbaginski@t...>
                    wrote:
                    > Well, can I take a look at least? Some links please?
                    >
                    > -Wojtek
                    >
                    > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "robrohdeszudy"
                    <robrohdeszudy@y...>
                    > wrote:
                    > > Aha! That's what I figured. You da man Steve.
                    > >
                    > > There you have it, Wojtek. Just overgrown hot dogs.
                    > >
                    > > --Rob
                    > >
                    > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Steven Lewis"
                    <numbaoneman@a...>
                    > > wrote:
                    > > > They weren't kielbasa... More like a footlong hotdog, beef,
                    pork,
                    > > > chicken or a combination thereof.
                    > > >
                    > > > Steve
                    > > >
                  • Bruce Hector
                    I ll bet 10 smoked kielbasa sausages don t cost $25 US dollars in Poland, do they Wojeck? Not the little one to fit in a bun and be eaten on the street with
                    Message 9 of 17 , Jul 7 7:36 PM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I'll bet 10 smoked kielbasa sausages don't cost $25 US dollars in
                      Poland, do they Wojeck? Not the little one to fit in a bun and be
                      eaten on the street with mustard and saurkraut.

                      I'll further risk Chicago's reputation by betting the Polish food in
                      Poland is more authentic, chewy, and tastier.

                      Just my opinion.

                      Bruce Hector
                      Remembering the street food in Germany as a teen.
                      Ummmmmmmmm......
                      Shaslik! Wurst! Bier!
                    • vexatious2001
                      ... pork, ... Well, now, I checked the records and Mike never referred to them as Polish sausage; he called them Polish hot dogs. I m not sure who started
                      Message 10 of 17 , Jul 7 8:15 PM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "robrohdeszudy"
                        <robrohdeszudy@y...> wrote:
                        > Aha! That's what I figured. You da man Steve.
                        >
                        > There you have it, Wojtek. Just overgrown hot dogs.
                        >
                        > --Rob
                        >
                        > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Steven Lewis" <numbaoneman@a...>
                        > wrote:
                        > > They weren't kielbasa... More like a footlong hotdog, beef,
                        pork,
                        > > chicken or a combination thereof.
                        > >
                        > > Steve
                        > >





                        Well, now, I checked the records and Mike never
                        referred to them as Polish "sausage;" he called them
                        Polish "hot dogs."

                        I'm not sure who started refereing to them as
                        "sausage."


                        Max
                      • wwbaginski
                        ... ... Thanks a lot for Polish style food info. As for me, I have Chicago style Weber barbeque made in Illinois . Looks we do the same on
                        Message 11 of 17 , Jul 8 2:08 AM
                        • 0 Attachment
                          --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "vexatious2001" <cadbury112@e...>
                          wrote:
                          > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "robrohdeszudy"
                          > <robrohdeszudy@y...> wrote:
                          > > Aha! That's what I figured. You da man Steve.
                          > >
                          > > There you have it, Wojtek. Just overgrown hot dogs.
                          > >
                          > > --Rob
                          > >
                          > > --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "Steven Lewis"
                          <numbaoneman@a...>
                          > > wrote:
                          > > > They weren't kielbasa... More like a footlong hotdog, beef,
                          > pork,
                          > > > chicken or a combination thereof.
                          > > >
                          > > > Steve
                          > > >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Well, now, I checked the records and Mike never
                          > referred to them as Polish "sausage;" he called them
                          > Polish "hot dogs."
                          >
                          > I'm not sure who started refereing to them as
                          > "sausage."
                          >
                          >
                          > Max

                          Thanks a lot for Polish style food info. As for me, I have Chicago
                          style Weber barbeque "made in Illinois". Looks we do the same on
                          Sundays... Now coming back to boats, if I once laminated campjon with
                          epoxy, will additional very local layer of polyester work good on it?

                          -Wojtek
                        • Bruce Hector
                          ... wrote: I m not sure who started refereing to them as sausage. Max, a hot dog is a sausage. Named as we all had difficulty pronouncing frankfurterwurst .
                          Message 12 of 17 , Jul 8 5:14 AM
                          • 0 Attachment
                            --- In Michalak@yahoogroups.com, "vexatious2001" <cadbury112@e...>
                            wrote: "I'm not sure who started refereing to them as sausage."

                            Max, a hot dog is a sausage.

                            Named as we all had difficulty pronouncing "frankfurterwurst".

                            Bruce
                          • Chuck Leinweber
                            ... Now coming back to boats, if I once laminated campjon with epoxy, will additional very local layer of polyester work good on it? -Wojtek
                            Message 13 of 17 , Jul 8 5:47 AM
                            • 0 Attachment
                              ... Now coming back to boats, if I once laminated campjon with
                              epoxy, will additional very local layer of polyester work good on it?

                              -Wojtek
                              ________________________

                              Wojtek:

                              The rule of thumb is: You can put epoxy over polyester, but not polyester
                              over epoxy. You don't want to use polyester anyway - it is very stinky and
                              tricky to work with. Besides the fact that it does not adhere very well.

                              Chuck




                              --
                              No virus found in this outgoing message.
                              Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
                              Version: 7.0.323 / Virus Database: 267.8.10/43 - Release Date: 7/6/2005
                            • Steven Lewis
                              The rule of thumb is: You can put epoxy over polyester, but not polyester ... stinky and ... well. ... What he said....ditto...I agree. You can barely get poly
                              Message 14 of 17 , Jul 8 6:05 AM
                              • 0 Attachment
                                The rule of thumb is: You can put epoxy over polyester, but not
                                polyester
                                > over epoxy. You don't want to use polyester anyway - it is very
                                stinky and
                                > tricky to work with. Besides the fact that it does not adhere very
                                well.
                                >
                                > Chuck



                                What he said....ditto...I agree. You can barely get poly to stick to
                                poly, let alone epoxy. If you used epoxy to start, stick with epoxy; if
                                you used poly to start, SWITCH to epoxy.


                                Steve
                              • Stefan Probst
                                ... Try Frankfurter Würstchen , if that is easier for you ;) Stefan
                                Message 15 of 17 , Jul 8 8:59 AM
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  --- "Bruce Hector" <bruce_hector@h...> wrote:
                                  > Named as we all had difficulty pronouncing "frankfurterwurst".

                                  Try "Frankfurter Würstchen", if that is easier for you ;)

                                  Stefan
                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.