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42 results from messages in MexicoDNAProject

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  • G2 has been found in the same places so it also fits the archaeological record of the recolonization of Europe. There is no proof R1b was part of a recolonization of Europe prior to 5,000 years ago because there is no DNA from in western Europe from that period. Knowledge of metallurgy helps create better tools and weapons which helps for better defense which leads to longer life...
    mexr1b@att.net Nov 22, 2013
  • You have not provided proof that the people involved in the archaeological finds, climate change, cultures, and geography were part of the R1b haplogroup in any of the instances older than 5,000 bp. You only proved that there were people there. Until it can be proven that those people were R1b it has no bearing on the subject. I agree that there were very few people on the planet...
    mexr1b@att.net Nov 20, 2013
  • You might also enjoy reading the following - May 14, 2012 Y chromosome diversity in Native Mexicans (Sandoval et al. 2012) From the paper: The first dimension of the CoA (60.53%) separates Q-M3 from the rest, and the second dimension (39.47%) C-M130 from the rest. In agreement ith the known distribution of haplogroup C, we observed that the two northernmost populations of this...
    mexr1b@att.net Aug 21, 2013
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  • It was never implied that the person only had ancestors with Y-DNA belonging to haplogroup Q. You read something that wasn't there and wasn't part of the discussion. --- In MexicoDNAProject@^$1, sangerjaime@^$2.. wrote: > > I stand to be corrected, but just because ones Y is European or Native American, or ones X is European or Native American, it does not mean that is your...
    mexr1b@att.net Aug 21, 2013
  • Garza and de la Garza might not be that common but you can't compare it to the most common such as Rodriguez, Gonzalez, Martinez, Garcia and so on. The same ten most common surnames in Spain are also the same most common Spanish surnames in Latin America and the U.S. https://familysearch.org/search/record/results#count=75&query=%2Bsurname%3A%22de%20la%20Garza%22~%20%2Bany_place...
    mexr1b@att.net Aug 21, 2013
  • I should have added this to the previous message. http://www.heraldaria.com/apellidos.php#13 --- In MexicoDNAProject@^$1, Jose rodriguez wrote: > > People usally added De La to name to sound like a higher social class. > > > > > ________________________________ > From: Heriberto Escamilla > To: "MexicoDNAProject@^$2" > Sent: Monday, August 19, 2013 4:53 PM > Subject: Re...
    mexr1b@att.net Aug 21, 2013
  • Just to add here is another family that took his wife and had at least one daughter in Mexico with Spanish mtDNA and created a large number of descendants with Spanish mtDNA. En la solicitud de ordenes mayores de su bisnieto Gonzalo Ramirez de Hermosillo sabemos que Juan González de Hermosillo el genearca de los González de Hermosillo de los Alto era natural de Guadalcanal...
    mexr1b@att.net Aug 21, 2013
  • In Spain when surnames were first used they used the prepositions "de" "del" and "de la" even before they implemented it's use as a sign of the higher class. In the 17th or 18th century the French used this as a sign of being part of a higher class and then Spain and Latin America adopted this practice. --- In MexicoDNAProject@^$1, Jose rodriguez wrote: > > People usally added De...
    mexr1b@att.net Aug 21, 2013
  • A preposition does not make a surname. There are many surnames that over time removed the prepostion "de" and "de la" I take it you also completely ignored that de la Cruz being found in Spain proven with the search of surnames in Spain using www.familysearch.org The statement "De La Cruz, no where in Spain will you locate that Surname." is false. --- In MexicoDNAProject@^$1...
    mexr1b@att.net Aug 21, 2013
  • The term Maya with Family Finder is just a generic term. Indians from all over Mexico will have their aDNA show as Maya. This does not mean they are literally directly descended from them. It is more an example about how far DNA testing has to go before they can correctly identify aDNA being part of a subgroup such as Mayans being a subgroups of Mexican and Central American Indians...
    mexr1b@att.net Aug 19, 2013