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Re: [MexicoDNAProject] Re: Pisaño from Chi huahua

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  • Heriberto Escamilla
    Pretty close to your dad, I am C1C2, also born in Nuevo Leon Beto ________________________________ From: Joel Peres To:
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 20, 2013
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      Pretty close to your dad, I am C1C2, also born in Nuevo Leon

      Beto


      From: Joel Peres <joelfrancisperes@...>
      To: "MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com" <MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, August 20, 2013 2:41 PM
      Subject: Re: [MexicoDNAProject] Re: Pisaño from Chihuahua

       
      I have an Italian match who's maternal haplogroup is C1b2 and he has a sliver of Native American ancestry.  This was a surprise to him, his grandmother arrived by boat to NYC in the early 1900s.  His ancestress must have been Native American.  My Dad born in Nuevo Leon, happens to be C1b2.  


      On Mon, Aug 19, 2013 at 6:06 PM, Heriberto Escamilla <betoescamilla@...> wrote:
       
      Yea, I can see that happening.  


      Beto


      From: Jose rodriguez <cirenio2003@...>
      To: "MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com" <MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, August 19, 2013 5:50 PM
      Subject: Re: [MexicoDNAProject] Re: Pisaño from Chihuahua

       
      El hijo de Malintzen (Malinche)  and Cortez, Martin,  rebelled against the Spanish authorities and he was sent to Spain and never came back to the land where he was born. The Spaniards also kidnapped natives and took them to Europe.




      From: Heriberto Escamilla <betoescamilla@...>
      To: "MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com" <MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, August 19, 2013 4:53 PM
      Subject: Re: [MexicoDNAProject] Re: Pisaño from Chihuahua

       
      That's the fun of researching and studying history, all of the possibilities. I had heard or read somewhere that the last name Garza, while common in Mexico is not all that common in Spain, where it originated. I don't know if that is true. While we tend to think of people immigrating from Spain to Mexico, it is also possible and likely that in 500 years, some Mestizos went back home. I wonder how may people born in Spain have indigenous DNA that went the other way?

      Beto


      From: Edward Romero <itsmeed20@...>
      To: "MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com" <MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, August 19, 2013 4:30 PM
      Subject: Re: [MexicoDNAProject] Re: Pisaño from Chihuahua

       
      If you want to comment, that's fine, but De La Cruz and Cruz are not the same surname.

      From: "mexr1b@..." <armandor1b@...>
      To: MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, August 19, 2013 3:03 PM
      Subject: [MexicoDNAProject] Re: Pisaño from Chihuahua
       
      Cruz and de la Cruz are definitely surnames found in Spain. Penelope Cruz is an example.

      Cruz is even found in Vizcaya. You can search for yourself at http://internet.aheb-beha.org/paginas/indexacion/n_indexacion.php#

      or at the Familysearch site
      https://familysearch.org/search/record/results#count=75&query=%2Bsurname%3A%22de%20la%20Cruz%22~%20%2Brecord_country%3ASpain

      When surnames first appeared in Spain they gave people a surname they felt like giving them. Many times the surname was from the town or region they were from, other times they were religious surnames, other times they were just plants, trees, and so on. Obviously Cruz is a shortened version of de la Cruz and it is a Christian based surname.

      --- In mailto:MexicoDNAProject%40yahoogroups.com, Edward Romero <itsmeed20@...> wrote:
      >
      > It's correct that the Catholic priest gave Surnames to the American Indians, they also took away their Indian names and replaced them mostly with Maria or Jose. They even made up Surnames such as: De La Cruz, no where in Spain will you locate that Surname.
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: JOEL SR <hrjoel3@...>
      > To: "mailto:MexicoDNAProject%40yahoogroups.com" <mailto:MexicoDNAProject%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Sunday, August 18, 2013 6:43 PM
      > Subject: Re: [MexicoDNAProject] Pisaño from Chihuahua
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      > Hola Pisano:
      >  
      > Q is Native American. Q and R are from the P.  It appears that Spanish surnames were given to Mexican Indians as done to North Native Americans acquired European names. We call them Christian names.
      > My tribal name is Tsoquali Giga  Adawehi.   
      >
      > Joel K. Harris, Sr., Ph.D.
      >
      >
      > >________________________________
      > >From: osalinas3 <osalinas3@...>
      > >To: mailto:MexicoDNAProject%40yahoogroups.com
      > >Sent: Sunday, August 18, 2013 3:48 AM
      > >Subject: Re: [MexicoDNAProject] Pisaño from Chihuahua
      > >
      > > 
      > >Excuse me for being a buttinsk but that most Spaniards came without women is a misconception.  Maybe the first Conquistadors  didn't but many, many Spainards and other Europeans came not only with women but whole families and even servants. If you read the lists of the passengers on ships which arrived to the New World as early as the 1500's you will see for yourself. Also in records of new arrivals requesting land they state so and so who arrived with his wife or his family requests this much land.  I've done years of research and have seen many records especially from the LDS church. 
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Expressâ„¢, an AT&T LTE smartphone
      > -------- Original message -------- From: Edmund Fimbres <slimered@...> Date: 08/18/2013 12:32 AM (GMT-06:00) To: mailto:MexicoDNAProject%40yahoogroups.com Subject: Re: [MexicoDNAProject] Pisaño from Chihuahua  
      > >Since the Spanish did not for the most part bring women with them, they interbred with the native americans which has resulted in predominantly European Y haplogroups among the mestizos such as R. However your Q-M242 is pretty clearly native in origin.
      > >
      > >On Sat, Aug 17, 2013 at 10:19 PM, Gregory Pisano <goyosan1@...> wrote:
      > >
      > >> 
      > >>I have a paper trail back to the early 1800s for my surname and its variant spellings (Pisana, Pizano, Pizana, with or without tilde) in Chihuahua.  The oldest reference is in Rio Florido, near Ciudad Chihuahua, most recently in Ciudad Juarez, before coming into Arizona around 1880.  However, my haplogroup is Q-M242; not an R like most others in this forum. Anyone care to comment on this or perhaps someone has run across this surname in their research?
      > >> 
      > >>Gregory Pisaño
      > >>(805) 748-5502
      > >> 
      > >> 
      > --
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