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575Re: Haplogroup Q Haplotypes from our Project and their likely Origin

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  • garyf@pacbell.net
    Aug 24, 2013
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      This paper came out a couple of days ago:
      The First Peopling of South America: New Evidence from Y-Chromosome Haplogroup Q

      "Our data not only confirm a southern Siberian origin of ancestral populations that gave rise to Paleo-Indians and the differentiation of both Native American Q founding lineages in Beringia, but support their concomitant arrival in Mesoamerica, where Mexico acted as recipient for the first wave of migration, followed by a rapid southward migration, along the Pacific coast, into the Andean region. Although Q1a3a1a-M3 and Q1a3a1-L54(xM3) display overlapping general distributions, they show different patterns of evolution in the Mexican plateau and the Andean area, which can be explained by local differentiations due to demographic events triggered by the introduction of agriculture and associated with the flourishing of the Great Empires."

      Figure 1 Phylogenetic tree of Y-chromosome haplogroup Q.

      "Only two American Y chromosomes did not cluster into the L54 sub-branch. They were both M378-positive, thus belonging to Q1b, a finding never previously reported for Native Americans. Considering that the phylogeography of this infrequent haplogroup is restricted to South West Asia [52]–[55], the most likely interpretation of this outcome is that they represent an arrival from Asia in contemporary history. For this reason the two Y chromosomes were not included in subsequent analyses."

      "The network of Q1a3a1a-M3* Y chromosomes includes North, Central and South American Y-chromosomes in a star-like shape, in agreement with an early entrance into America and wide expansion of this lineage in the entire continent. The central haplotype, which includes two Far Eastern Asian samples (one Koryak and one Even [59]), is most represented by Mexican and Andean subjects while Canadian samples are mainly observed as one and two steps derivative haplotypes. Regional expansions are present in all areas but are particular evident in the Andean and Canadian regions."

      "The network of the Q-L54* Y chromosomes is characterized by multiple reticulations, which suggest that they are part of different sub-clades still to be discovered. In spite the low frequency of these Y chromosomes, their preferential Mesoamerican distribution emerges. None of the L54* Y chromosomes is observed in Far Eastern Asian populations living along the entry route to the Americas; its sub-clade L330 underwent expansion in Mongolia and Southern-Altai, whereas the upstream intermediate L53* characterizes Northern-Altai (Figure 3), with a single observation in Mongolia."

      "Two main founding lineages, Q1a3a1a-M3 and Q1a3a1-L54(xM3), have been observed in this study. Their variation in the Americas is not as restricted as was hitherto thought, giving genetic support to the Pleistocene/Holocene cultural variability in South America recently proposed by Neves and collaborators [60]. They display overlapping general distributions, but their diffusion patterns along the continent suggest they underwent different demographic processes. The most frequent, Q1a3a1a-M3*, shows a network which encompasses North, Central and South American chromosomes in a star-like shape indicative of a first general north-to-south diffusion followed by local expansions in Canada, Mexico and the Andean regions in agreement with a general north-to-south decreasing variance (V) and haplotype diversity (h) (Table S3). On the other hand, the network of Q1a3a1a1-L54* is mainly represented by single observations of well differentiated haplotypes and is characterized by many reticulations, indicative of the coexistence of deeper-rooted sub-lineages, with signs of expansions only in Mexico. The presence of these "expanded" haplotypes can explain the lower h encountered in Mexico (0.9344) in comparison with that observed in the Andean region (0.9883) in spite of the higher V (0.518 vs 0.451)."

      Saludos,

      Gary

      Mexico DNA Project Admin.





      --- In MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com, "garyf@..." wrote:
      >
      > This is a Q-L53 which is early on the Native American branch (L53+,
      > M242+, L191-, M3-) http://www.isogg.org/tree/ISOGG_HapgrpQ.html
      > Gallegos, Ben
      > Native American -
      > Q-L53
      > > _max=0&mismatch_type=sliding&mismatches_sliding_starting_marker=8&lastna\
      > me_limiter=none&haplo=®ion=>
      > 13231410101612121113143117080911112414192914141616This is Q-M3 which is
      > an expansion Native American marker which has back migrated into Siberia
      > in small numbers:Corbera Surname - DYS MarkersParticipantO
      > r
      > i
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      > Y
      > s
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      > a
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      > h
      > 3
      > 9
      > 33
      > 9
      > 0
      > 1
      > 93
      > 9
      > 13
      > 8
      > 5
      > a3
      > 8
      > 5
      > b4
      > 2
      > 63
      > 8
      > 84
      > 3
      > 93
      > 8
      > 9
      > -
      > 13
      > 9
      > 23
      > 8
      > 9
      > -
      > 24
      > 5
      > 84
      > 5
      > 9
      > a4
      > 5
      > 9
      > b4
      > 5
      > 54
      > 5
      > 44
      > 4
      > 74
      > 3
      > 74
      > 4
      > 84
      > 4
      > 94
      > 6
      > 4
      > a4
      > 6
      > 4
      > b4
      > 6
      > 4
      > c4
      > 6
      > 4
      > dCorbera, Florentino L.
      > Native American -
      > Q-M3
      > > atch_type=absolute&mismatches_max=6&mismatches_sliding_starting_marker=8\
      > &lastname_limiter=none&haplo=®ion=>
      > 14231310151812121212132818090911092514202814141517
      > This is a subclade of Q that expanded out of the Middle East and is
      > parallel to the branch that reached the
      > Americas:http://www.isogg.org/tree/ISOGG_HapgrpQ.html
      > Dominguez, Ruben
      > Central
      > Asia/Middle East - Q-L938
      > > atches_max=0&mismatch_type=sliding&mismatches_sliding_starting_marker=32\
      > &lastname_limiter=none&recaptcha_challenge_field=03AHJ_VuvCiWSP4mako66hL\
      > R_LbD0AACw2eOop2-GAiMEBqBMdbddGqaTEZQeefZ73JVuNBrN6vtYHTiFf0lszyYLB_1E45\
      > XCVAgfHE5SFgsrfWGZkIy4bNGxHY06lkep6v33SE2paY5qtpfc8IAMwk1Tdj_nwis3yPA&re\
      > captcha_response_field=names%2C+hreshe&haplo=®ion=>
      > 14251310141712121214133017090911112715183114151616
      >
      >
      >
      > This is a Q1b which is likely Jewish in origin as this origin seems to
      > have survived in Iberia with the Jews (this sample is from north western
      > Mexico) and matches Sephardics in Iberia:Altamirano Surname - DYS
      > MarkersParticipantO
      > r
      > i
      > g
      > i
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      > Y
      > s
      > e
      > a
      > r
      > c
      > h
      > 3
      > 9
      > 33
      > 9
      > 0
      > 1
      > 93
      > 9
      > 13
      > 8
      > 5
      > a3
      > 8
      > 5
      > b4
      > 2
      > 63
      > 8
      > 84
      > 3
      > 93
      > 8
      > 9
      > -
      > 13
      > 9
      > 23
      > 8
      > 9
      > -
      > 24
      > 5
      > 84
      > 5
      > 9
      > a4
      > 5
      > 9
      > b4
      > 5
      > 54
      > 5
      > 44
      > 4
      > 74
      > 3
      > 74
      > 4
      > 84
      > 4
      > 94
      > 6
      > 4
      > a4
      > 6
      > 4
      > b4
      > 6
      > 4
      > c4
      > 6
      > 4
      > dAltamirano (Anonymous)Central Asia/Middle East - Q1b-M378
      >
      >
      > > _max=0&mismatch_type=sliding&mismatches_sliding_starting_marker=8&lastna\
      > me_limiter=none&haplo=®ion=>
      > 12221310131612121213152918091011112514183013131515
      > Generally speaking Q's with no matches or US are Native American. If you
      > match closely Europeans or Middle Easterners or other non Native
      > American groups I would suggest testing further.
      >
      > Saludos,GaryMexico DNA Project Admin.
      >
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