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558Re: Pisaño from Chihuahua

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  • mexr1b@att.net
    Aug 21, 2013
      You might also enjoy reading the following -

      May 14, 2012
      Y chromosome diversity in Native Mexicans (Sandoval et al. 2012)
      From the paper:

      The first dimension of the CoA (60.53%) separates Q-M3 from the rest, and the second dimension (39.47%) C-M130 from the rest. In agreement ith the known distribution of haplogroup C, we observed that the two northernmost populations of this panel (Chippewa and Sioux) cluster next to C-M130 and the rest of populations show varying proportions of Q-M242 and Q-M3. It is noteworthy that Native Mexicans are the only regional group with populations represented next to both the Q-M242 cluster and the Q-M3 cluster. In contrast, all Central and South American samples were grouped significantly closer to the Q-M3 haplogroup (Fig. 3).

      Am J Phys Anthropol DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.22062

      Y-chromosome diversity in Native Mexicans reveals continental transition of genetic structure in the Americas

      Karla Sandoval et al.

      The genetic characterization of Native Mexicans is important to understand multiethnic based features influencing the medical genetics of present Mexican populations, as well as to the reconstruct the peopling of the Americas. We describe the Y-chromosome genetic diversity of 197 Native Mexicans from 11 populations and 1,044 individuals from 44 Native American populations after combining with publicly available data. We found extensive heterogeneity among Native Mexican populations and ample segregation of Q-M242* (46%) and Q-M3 (54%) haplogroups within Mexico. The northernmost sampled populations falling outside Mesoamerica (Pima and Tarahumara) showed a clear differentiation with respect to the other populations, which is in agreement with previous results from mtDNA lineages. However, our results point toward a complex genetic makeup of Native Mexicans whose maternal and paternal lineages reveal different narratives of their population history, with sex-biased continental contributions and different admixture proportions. At a continental scale, we found that Arctic populations and the northernmost groups from North America cluster together, but we did not find a clear differentiation within Mesoamerica and the rest of the continent, which coupled with the fact that the majority of individuals from Central and South American samples are restricted to the Q-M3 branch, supports the notion that most Native Americans from Mesoamerica southwards are descendants from a single wave of migration. This observation is compatible with the idea that present day Mexico might have constituted an area of transition in the diversification of paternal lineages during the colonization of the Americas.

      http://dienekes.blogspot.com/2012/05/y-chromosome-diversity-in-native.html

      --- In MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com, "Gregory Pisano" <goyosan1@...> wrote:
      >
      > Gary, Thank you. I used this quite a bit when I was in SLC last fall but it
      > is a good reminder to go back and review it again. I have been making some
      > progress understanding my Q haplogroup. I found a link on Wikipedia
      > (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Y-DNA_haplogroups_in_indigenous_peoples_of_the
      > _Americas) that can be sorted. Based on my Q-M242 haplotype and my
      > genealogical paper trail, I reckon that I might be one of the Uto-Aztecan
      > language groups.
      >
      >
      >
      > Gregory Pisaño
      >
      > (805) 748-5502
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > From: MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of garyf@...
      > Sent: August 19, 2013 9:06 PM
      > To: MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [MexicoDNAProject] Re: Pisaño from Chihuahua
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi Gregory,
      >
      > you probably have seen this link but for those who are researching Chihuahua
      > here is the latter day saints link to this state:
      >
      > https://familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A%2F%2Ffamilysearch.o
      > rg%2Frecords%2Fcollection%2F1922462%2Fwaypoints
      >
      >
      >
      > Saludos,
      >
      > Gary
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In MexicoDNAProject@yahoogroups.com, "Gregory Pisano" wrote:
      > >
      > > I have a paper trail back to the early 1800s for my surname and its
      > variant
      > > spellings (Pisana, Pizano, Pizana, with or without tilde) in Chihuahua.
      > The
      > > oldest reference is in Rio Florido, near Ciudad Chihuahua, most recently
      > in
      > > Ciudad Juarez, before coming into Arizona around 1880. However, my
      > > haplogroup is Q-M242; not an R like most others in this forum. Anyone care
      > > to comment on this or perhaps someone has run across this surname in their
      > > research?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Gregory Pisaño
      > >
      > > (805) 748-5502
      > >
      >
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