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Re: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry

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  • robert hernandez
    ??????? ________________________________ From: Carl Silva To: MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 18, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      ???????


      From: Carl Silva <carlsilva86@...>
      To: "MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com" <MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, September 16, 2012 7:35 PM
      Subject: Re: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry

       
      Hi,  This was just as short as I could make it ,sorry.  The one thing that I belive I left out was that the Mexican Goverment had to pay the oil companies to get out.  The Mex. Gov. did not have the money so they had to ask the people for donations which they gave.  When people like P. Villa and others say that the americans are steeling from the mexicans the people of Mexico believe it and they still do to this day.  It was just making the best deal the companies could make.  At the time Mexico did not have the money to get and process the oil.
      The bad thing that the people of the USA have to put up with is when they go to Mexico , with their sunglases and shorts on the Mexican people say their are the people that steel from us.
      Is that not just the best thing ever.

      From: Ray Acosta <ramon4@...>
      To: MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, September 16, 2012 1:29 PM
      Subject: RE: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry
       
      I see the book "Oil and Revolution" by Jon Brown is available on-line for free at:
      http://publishing.cdlib.org/ucpressebooks/view?docId=ft3q2nb28s;chunk.id=0;doc.view=print

      Cheers
      --- On Sun, 9/16/12, Ray Acosta <ramon4@...> wrote:

      From: Ray Acosta <ramon4@...>
      Subject: RE: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry
      To: MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, September 16, 2012, 1:18 PM

       
      You might be interested in a book called "Oil and Revolution in Mexico" by Jonathan Brown, published by The University of California Press, 1993 ISBN 0520079345.

      It is available on Amazon and Able books, but its kind of expensive.  Perhaps in a college library near you or the library of a major city.

      Cheers

      --- On Sun, 9/16/12, F N Miranda <F_N_Miranda@...> wrote:

      From: F N Miranda <F_N_Miranda@...>
      Subject: RE: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry
      To: "MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com" <mexicanrevolution@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Sunday, September 16, 2012, 1:04 PM

       
      It was just getting interesting... is there an expanded form of this article somewhere? -Frank Miranda
      To: MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com From: carlsilva86@... Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 23:10:21 +0000 Subject: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry 
      Mexican Oil Industry
      Prasanth Boyareddigari
      George Newton
      Luis Testas Dr. Jorge Gonzalez
       
      The history of Mexican oil is very closely tied to the people of Mexico and their culture. Oil has been a part of Mexico's heritage from the time of the Aztecs and Mayas. They used to use it for coloring fabrics and as glue, whereas today's Mexico uses it as a fuel. To truly understand the development of the Mexican oil industry, and the relationship between the Mexican people and the oil industry, we have to delve into the history of oil. In 1868, the Gulf of Mexico Exploration Company began the first industrialized drilling for oil in the state of Veracruz. They mined the oil and built refineries where they produced kerosene. Most of the first commercial development of the oil industry came from the foreign countries, mainly the U.S. and Great Britain. The reason for this was a law passed in 1884, which gave underground development right to the people who owned the land. Thus, many of the rich people who owned the land, now also owned the oil beneath it. Because the U.S. and Great Britain had a lot of money to invest, they bought much of the land securing their stake in Mexican oil. The foreign ownership of Mexican oil drained Mexico of financial benefits that it would otherwise have had. Several of these foreign investors improved the organization of the Mexican oil industry while at the same time reaping in the vast financial benefits.  All of which was done within Mexican Law. In 1885, Henry Clay Pierce was one of the people who was reaping in the wealth of Mexican oil. He owned an affiliate of Standard Oil, which was monopolizing the importing of oil into Mexico to be refined into kerosene in his factories. He also owned railroads in Mexico, so to run the trains, he needed more oil. He involved Edward L. Doheny, another U.S. oilman. Doheny started the Mexican Petroleum Company. The company drilled actively for the next twenty-five years, and in 1916 commanded much of the Mexican oil production including the well at Cerro Azul, the largest well in the world at the time. The British had similar success stories with Mexican oil. To make matters even more extreme, two very important laws were passed in the early 1900's. The Petroleum Law (1901) allowed the granting of concessions on public lands, and the Mining Law of 1909 reaffirmed the rights of land-owners to develop their subterranean assets. In addition, the government removed import taxes on drilling equipment and exempted oil-company capital stock from taxes. All of this legislation helped keep the Mexican oil industry in the hands of foreigners, and allowed those foreigners who already had control to get a tighter grip. The oil industry continued to expand through 1921, as the industrialized countries kept demanding more and more oil due to wars and an increasing volume of motorized transportation. Also during this time, foreign ownership increased to the point that almost all of the productive oil land in Mexico was owned by foreigners. However, prior to 1921, there were hints that Mexicans wanted their oil back. In 1917, article 27 of the constitution basically said that any oil or energy related substances found underground, belonged to the state. Foreigners could lease the underground privileges but never actually own them. Also, around the same time, labor laws were passed which insured workers better pay and eight-hour days. Both of these pieces of legislation were detrimental to the foreign investors. By 1936 the Sindicato de Trabajadores Petroleros de la Republica Mexicana (STPRM) were organized. STPRM was the largest oil labor union ever formed in Mexico up to this time. They demanded more benefits, which the companies refused. This began to create a larger rift between Mexican and Foreign relations. The nationalistic attitudes took over as Mexico felt insulted by the foreigners. As the oil companies kept gaining power, the Mexican people were frustrated and turned to their president, Lazaro Cardenas. In 1938, Cardenas made history with one of the most important actions in Mexican history: he expropriated the property of seventeen foreign oil companies.


    • robert hernandez
      ???????? ________________________________ From: Carl Silva To: MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 18, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        ????????


        From: Carl Silva <carlsilva86@...>
        To: "MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com" <MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, September 16, 2012 7:35 PM
        Subject: Re: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry

         
        Hi,  This was just as short as I could make it ,sorry.  The one thing that I belive I left out was that the Mexican Goverment had to pay the oil companies to get out.  The Mex. Gov. did not have the money so they had to ask the people for donations which they gave.  When people like P. Villa and others say that the americans are steeling from the mexicans the people of Mexico believe it and they still do to this day.  It was just making the best deal the companies could make.  At the time Mexico did not have the money to get and process the oil.
        The bad thing that the people of the USA have to put up with is when they go to Mexico , with their sunglases and shorts on the Mexican people say their are the people that steel from us.
        Is that not just the best thing ever.

        From: Ray Acosta <ramon4@...>
        To: MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, September 16, 2012 1:29 PM
        Subject: RE: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry
         
        I see the book "Oil and Revolution" by Jon Brown is available on-line for free at:
        http://publishing.cdlib.org/ucpressebooks/view?docId=ft3q2nb28s;chunk.id=0;doc.view=print

        Cheers
        --- On Sun, 9/16/12, Ray Acosta <ramon4@...> wrote:

        From: Ray Acosta <ramon4@...>
        Subject: RE: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry
        To: MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, September 16, 2012, 1:18 PM

         
        You might be interested in a book called "Oil and Revolution in Mexico" by Jonathan Brown, published by The University of California Press, 1993 ISBN 0520079345.

        It is available on Amazon and Able books, but its kind of expensive.  Perhaps in a college library near you or the library of a major city.

        Cheers

        --- On Sun, 9/16/12, F N Miranda <F_N_Miranda@...> wrote:

        From: F N Miranda <F_N_Miranda@...>
        Subject: RE: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry
        To: "MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com" <mexicanrevolution@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Sunday, September 16, 2012, 1:04 PM

         
        It was just getting interesting... is there an expanded form of this article somewhere? -Frank Miranda
        To: MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com From: carlsilva86@... Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 23:10:21 +0000 Subject: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry 
        Mexican Oil Industry
        Prasanth Boyareddigari
        George Newton
        Luis Testas Dr. Jorge Gonzalez
         
        The history of Mexican oil is very closely tied to the people of Mexico and their culture. Oil has been a part of Mexico's heritage from the time of the Aztecs and Mayas. They used to use it for coloring fabrics and as glue, whereas today's Mexico uses it as a fuel. To truly understand the development of the Mexican oil industry, and the relationship between the Mexican people and the oil industry, we have to delve into the history of oil. In 1868, the Gulf of Mexico Exploration Company began the first industrialized drilling for oil in the state of Veracruz. They mined the oil and built refineries where they produced kerosene. Most of the first commercial development of the oil industry came from the foreign countries, mainly the U.S. and Great Britain. The reason for this was a law passed in 1884, which gave underground development right to the people who owned the land. Thus, many of the rich people who owned the land, now also owned the oil beneath it. Because the U.S. and Great Britain had a lot of money to invest, they bought much of the land securing their stake in Mexican oil. The foreign ownership of Mexican oil drained Mexico of financial benefits that it would otherwise have had. Several of these foreign investors improved the organization of the Mexican oil industry while at the same time reaping in the vast financial benefits.  All of which was done within Mexican Law. In 1885, Henry Clay Pierce was one of the people who was reaping in the wealth of Mexican oil. He owned an affiliate of Standard Oil, which was monopolizing the importing of oil into Mexico to be refined into kerosene in his factories. He also owned railroads in Mexico, so to run the trains, he needed more oil. He involved Edward L. Doheny, another U.S. oilman. Doheny started the Mexican Petroleum Company. The company drilled actively for the next twenty-five years, and in 1916 commanded much of the Mexican oil production including the well at Cerro Azul, the largest well in the world at the time. The British had similar success stories with Mexican oil. To make matters even more extreme, two very important laws were passed in the early 1900's. The Petroleum Law (1901) allowed the granting of concessions on public lands, and the Mining Law of 1909 reaffirmed the rights of land-owners to develop their subterranean assets. In addition, the government removed import taxes on drilling equipment and exempted oil-company capital stock from taxes. All of this legislation helped keep the Mexican oil industry in the hands of foreigners, and allowed those foreigners who already had control to get a tighter grip. The oil industry continued to expand through 1921, as the industrialized countries kept demanding more and more oil due to wars and an increasing volume of motorized transportation. Also during this time, foreign ownership increased to the point that almost all of the productive oil land in Mexico was owned by foreigners. However, prior to 1921, there were hints that Mexicans wanted their oil back. In 1917, article 27 of the constitution basically said that any oil or energy related substances found underground, belonged to the state. Foreigners could lease the underground privileges but never actually own them. Also, around the same time, labor laws were passed which insured workers better pay and eight-hour days. Both of these pieces of legislation were detrimental to the foreign investors. By 1936 the Sindicato de Trabajadores Petroleros de la Republica Mexicana (STPRM) were organized. STPRM was the largest oil labor union ever formed in Mexico up to this time. They demanded more benefits, which the companies refused. This began to create a larger rift between Mexican and Foreign relations. The nationalistic attitudes took over as Mexico felt insulted by the foreigners. As the oil companies kept gaining power, the Mexican people were frustrated and turned to their president, Lazaro Cardenas. In 1938, Cardenas made history with one of the most important actions in Mexican history: he expropriated the property of seventeen foreign oil companies.


      • John Vance
        It is so sad that they are fed such propaganda.   I pray that they will rise above the corruption and resentment. ... From: Carl Silva
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 20, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          It is so sad that they are fed such propaganda.
           
          I pray that they will rise above the corruption and resentment.

          --- On Sun, 9/16/12, Carl Silva <carlsilva86@...> wrote:

          From: Carl Silva <carlsilva86@...>
          Subject: Re: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry
          To: "MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com" <MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com>
          Date: Sunday, September 16, 2012, 9:35 PM

           
          Hi,  This was just as short as I could make it ,sorry.  The one thing that I belive I left out was that the Mexican Goverment had to pay the oil companies to get out.  The Mex. Gov. did not have the money so they had to ask the people for donations which they gave.  When people like P. Villa and others say that the americans are steeling from the mexicans the people of Mexico believe it and they still do to this day.  It was just making the best deal the companies could make.  At the time Mexico did not have the money to get and process the oil.
          The bad thing that the people of the USA have to put up with is when they go to Mexico , with their sunglases and shorts on the Mexican people say their are the people that steel from us.
          Is that not just the best thing ever.

          From: Ray Acosta <ramon4@...>
          To: MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, September 16, 2012 1:29 PM
          Subject: RE: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry
           
          I see the book "Oil and Revolution" by Jon Brown is available on-line for free at:
          http://publishing.cdlib.org/ucpressebooks/view?docId=ft3q2nb28s;chunk.id=0;doc.view=print

          Cheers
          --- On Sun, 9/16/12, Ray Acosta <ramon4@...> wrote:

          From: Ray Acosta <ramon4@...>
          Subject: RE: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry
          To: MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, September 16, 2012, 1:18 PM

           
          You might be interested in a book called "Oil and Revolution in Mexico" by Jonathan Brown, published by The University of California Press, 1993 ISBN 0520079345.

          It is available on Amazon and Able books, but its kind of expensive.  Perhaps in a college library near you or the library of a major city.

          Cheers

          --- On Sun, 9/16/12, F N Miranda <F_N_Miranda@...> wrote:

          From: F N Miranda <F_N_Miranda@...>
          Subject: RE: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry
          To: "MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com" <mexicanrevolution@yahoogroups.com>
          Date: Sunday, September 16, 2012, 1:04 PM

           
          It was just getting interesting... is there an expanded form of this article somewhere? -Frank Miranda
          To: MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com From: carlsilva86@... Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 23:10:21 +0000 Subject: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry  
          Mexican Oil Industry
          Prasanth Boyareddigari
          George Newton
          Luis Testas Dr. Jorge Gonzalez
           
          The history of Mexican oil is very closely tied to the people of Mexico and their culture. Oil has been a part of Mexico's heritage from the time of the Aztecs and Mayas. They used to use it for coloring fabrics and as glue, whereas today's Mexico uses it as a fuel. To truly understand the development of the Mexican oil industry, and the relationship between the Mexican people and the oil industry, we have to delve into the history of oil. In 1868, the Gulf of Mexico Exploration Company began the first industrialized drilling for oil in the state of Veracruz. They mined the oil and built refineries where they produced kerosene. Most of the first commercial development of the oil industry came from the foreign countries, mainly the U.S. and Great Britain. The reason for this was a law passed in 1884, which gave underground development right to the people who owned the land. Thus, many of the rich people who owned the land, now also owned the oil beneath it. Because the U.S. and Great Britain had a lot of money to invest, they bought much of the land securing their stake in Mexican oil. The foreign ownership of Mexican oil drained Mexico of financial benefits that it would otherwise have had. Several of these foreign investors improved the organization of the Mexican oil industry while at the same time reaping in the vast financial benefits.  All of which was done within Mexican Law. In 1885, Henry Clay Pierce was one of the people who was reaping in the wealth of Mexican oil. He owned an affiliate of Standard Oil, which was monopolizing the importing of oil into Mexico to be refined into kerosene in his factories. He also owned railroads in Mexico, so to run the trains, he needed more oil. He involved Edward L. Doheny, another U.S. oilman. Doheny started the Mexican Petroleum Company. The company drilled actively for the next twenty-five years, and in 1916 commanded much of the Mexican oil production including the well at Cerro Azul, the largest well in the world at the time. The British had similar success stories with Mexican oil. To make matters even more extreme, two very important laws were passed in the early 1900's. The Petroleum Law (1901) allowed the granting of concessions on public lands, and the Mining Law of 1909 reaffirmed the rights of land-owners to develop their subterranean assets. In addition, the government removed import taxes on drilling equipment and exempted oil-company capital stock from taxes. All of this legislation helped keep the Mexican oil industry in the hands of foreigners, and allowed those foreigners who already had control to get a tighter grip. The oil industry continued to expand through 1921, as the industrialized countries kept demanding more and more oil due to wars and an increasing volume of motorized transportation. Also during this time, foreign ownership increased to the point that almost all of the productive oil land in Mexico was owned by foreigners. However, prior to 1921, there were hints that Mexicans wanted their oil back. In 1917, article 27 of the constitution basically said that any oil or energy related substances found underground, belonged to the state. Foreigners could lease the underground privileges but never actually own them. Also, around the same time, labor laws were passed which insured workers better pay and eight-hour days. Both of these pieces of legislation were detrimental to the foreign investors. By 1936 the Sindicato de Trabajadores Petroleros de la Republica Mexicana (STPRM) were organized. STPRM was the largest oil labor union ever formed in Mexico up to this time. They demanded more benefits, which the companies refused. This began to create a larger rift between Mexican and Foreign relations. The nationalistic attitudes took over as Mexico felt insulted by the foreigners. As the oil companies kept gaining power, the Mexican people were frustrated and turned to their president, Lazaro Cardenas. In 1938, Cardenas made history with one of the most important actions in Mexican history: he expropriated the property of seventeen foreign oil companies.
        • monroesilver
          I finally bought and watched the DVD movie “For Greater Glory” , about the Cristero War on the 1920’s in Mexico . What an outstanding movie in so many
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 1, 2012
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            I finally bought and watched the DVD movie “For Greater Glory” , about the Cristero War on the 1920’s in Mexico . What an outstanding movie in so many ways . The acting & actors were the best . Such rich , interesting , fascinating characters , all thrown together to stand against an evil that they were willing to give their lives to defeat .
             
            It may be , like almost every historical movie , that complete accuracy had to yield to show the basic story in a little over one hour of screen time . Also , there were probably several characters that were merged into one character , for clarity & simplicity  . So , with those few possible criticisms aside , it was just a great drama in many ways . (My only personal negative , was my DVD did not offer subtitles in English & with my hearing so bad , I know I missed some important dialog , that would have made some parts of the movie plot more clear .)
             
            The scenery & settings & clothing & period accuracy , were spot on . As a simple example , in one scene , a man and woman were talking about the government oppression while seated at an outdoor café . As the camera “circled in to view them up close” , you saw an advertising sign posted on one of the café columns next to the couple , with a beer brand advertisement . It had to be a perfect copy of a 1920’s style advertising poster . Perfect detail throughout the movie !
             
            Just a personal observation : Is there any historical character , more romantic & dashing & colorful , with the swagger , sassy demeanor , confidence , wearing the equipment of a fighter/warrior , than the Mexican bandit/revolutionary ? I watched and watched  the scene where the ex Zapatista , now Cristero fighter , was attacked at his remote ranch by about 10 Federal troops & killed them all in a most exciting gun fight .
             
            Just a great movie , with a wonderful story of a time where rich , poor , men , women , young , old , priests & laymen , all were willing to fight and give their lives against a powerful foe , to right a terrible wrong ! Viva Cristeros !
             
            PS---There were great actors in this movie from Mexico . If anyone wants to see another movie with absolutely fantastic Mexican actors , please watch Mel Gibson’s “Get the Gringo” . Filmed exclusively in Mexico , with the majority of the actors from Mexico . Main setting is a “most unique Mexican prison” and believe me this is not a typical “prison movie” . Great story & plot , but it’s the actors that make this so fun to watch , esp a 10 year old boy & his Mom , but so many others are fantastic .
          • Paul Renteria
            I agree For Greater Glory was a Great detailed Movie~I just could not be Suspended in my Belief that Cubano Actor Andy Garcia was a Mexican Horseman,,,,,,
            Message 5 of 11 , Oct 1, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              I agree "For Greater Glory" was a Great detailed Movie~I just could not be Suspended in my Belief that Cubano Actor Andy Garcia was a Mexican Horseman,,,,,,
               
              "Old Gringo" was the Best Detailed Movie for me~Dutch/Puerto Rican Actor Jimmy Smits did a Great Job portraying a Mexican Revolutionary General,,,,,,
              Someday for Authenticity, it would be Great to see a Real Mexicano portraying a Real Historical Mexicano a la Antonio Aguilar (*RIP*) o Pedro Armendariz (*RIP*) in a Big Budget~Studio Movie with Universal Appeal & not just for the USA market,,,,,,
               
              Paul Renteria~*Actor*Riding for a Cause*
               


              --- On Mon, 10/1/12, monroesilver <monroesilver@...> wrote:

              From: monroesilver <monroesilver@...>
              Subject: Re: [MexicanRevolution] Mexican Oil Industry
              To: MexicanRevolution@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, October 1, 2012, 6:53 AM

               
              I finally bought and watched the DVD movie “For Greater Glory” , about the Cristero War on the 1920’s in Mexico . What an outstanding movie in so many ways . The acting & actors were the best . Such rich , interesting , fascinating characters , all thrown together to stand against an evil that they were willing to give their lives to defeat .
               
              It may be , like almost every historical movie , that complete accuracy had to yield to show the basic story in a little over one hour of screen time . Also , there were probably several characters that were merged into one character , for clarity & simplicity  . So , with those few possible criticisms aside , it was just a great drama in many ways . (My only personal negative , was my DVD did not offer subtitles in English & with my hearing so bad , I know I missed some important dialog , that would have made some parts of the movie plot more clear .)
               
              The scenery & settings & clothing & period accuracy , were spot on . As a simple example , in one scene , a man and woman were talking about the government oppression while seated at an outdoor café . As the camera “circled in to view them up close” , you saw an advertising sign posted on one of the café columns next to the couple , with a beer brand advertisement . It had to be a perfect copy of a 1920’s style advertising poster . Perfect detail throughout the movie !
               
              Just a personal observation : Is there any historical character , more romantic & dashing & colorful , with the swagger , sassy demeanor , confidence , wearing the equipment of a fighter/warrior , than the Mexican bandit/revolutionary ? I watched and watched  the scene where the ex Zapatista , now Cristero fighter , was attacked at his remote ranch by about 10 Federal troops & killed them all in a most exciting gun fight .
               
              Just a great movie , with a wonderful story of a time where rich , poor , men , women , young , old , priests & laymen , all were willing to fight and give their lives against a powerful foe , to right a terrible wrong ! Viva Cristeros !
               
              PS---There were great actors in this movie from Mexico . If anyone wants to see another movie with absolutely fantastic Mexican actors , please watch Mel Gibson’s “Get the Gringo” . Filmed exclusively in Mexico , with the majority of the actors from Mexico . Main setting is a “most unique Mexican prison” and believe me this is not a typical “prison movie” . Great story & plot , but it’s the actors that make this so fun to watch , esp a 10 year old boy & his Mom , but so many others are fantastic .
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