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Inspectors Want Access to Iranian Sites -- NY Times

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    Inspectors Want Access to Iranian Sites -- NY Times Thu Dec 2, 2004 01:19 AM ET http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=6973539 NEW YORK
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      Inspectors Want Access to Iranian Sites -- NY Times
      Thu Dec 2, 2004 01:19 AM ET
      http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=6973539
      NEW YORK (Reuters) - Inspectors from the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency want
      to access two secret military sites in Iran where Tehran could be
      developing atomic weapons, the New York Times reported on Thursday.

      Iran, which insists its nuclear program is solely for electricity
      generation, on Monday escaped possible U.N. sanctions after agreeing to
      suspend all activities which could be used to make bomb-grade material.

      The inspectors, from the International Atomic Energy Agency, believe that
      satellite photographs show that high explosives are being tested and that
      procurement records show that equipment has been bought that can be used
      for enriching uranium, diplomats told the newspaper.

      The intelligence came from several sources, including nations that are
      members of the IAEA, diplomats and weapons experts said, the Times
      reported.

      The military sites the inspectors are requesting access to -- the Parchin
      military complex southeast of Tehran and Lavisan II in northeastern
      Tehran -- are usually considered to be off limits to the IAEA, which
      traditionally limits its monitoring to civilian nuclear programs.

      Weapons experts say the equipment that has been purchased could be used for
      nonnuclear activities, according to the Times.

      IAEA chief Mohamed ElBaradei told the New York Times in an interview that
      he has asked Iran many times for access to the two sites, but permission
      has so far not been granted.

      He added that it could take at least two years to resolve all the issues
      surrounding Iran's nuclear program, even if the country fully cooperates,
      according to the paper.

      Iran could be stalling for time to clean up the sites and remove evidence
      of nuclear research, one European official said, the Times reported.

      © Reuters 2004. All Rights Reserved.
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